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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

*v 






ANNUAL ^4 



TOWN REPORT 







CHELMSFORD 
1980 



IN MEMORIAM 



LESLIE ADAMS 

Finance Committee 
Varney Playground Commission 

FRANK DELMORE 

Board of Registrars 

FREDERICK GREENWOOD 

Superintendent of Streets 

RAYMOND GREENWOOD 

Selectman 
Board of Health 

GEORGE MARINEL 

Special Police Officer 

PETER J. McHUGH, JR. 

Planning Board 
Building Inspector 

WILLIAM J. REYNOLDS 

School Committee 

ROYAL SHAWCROSS 

Selectman 

EDMUND WELCH 

Board of Health 
Democratic Town Committee 

GEORGE WELCH 

Water Commissioner 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1980 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 
Location 



County 

Land Area: 

Population, 1980 

Assessed Valuation 1980 

Tax Rate: 

United States Senators in Congress: 

5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court: . 

16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 

Building Inspector 

Board of Health 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 

Children's House 

McKay Library 

School Superintendent 

Selectmen's Office 

Town Clerk 

Tax Collector & Treasurer 

Veterans Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, 

Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. It 

is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, 

and 225 miles from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

31,145 

$282,809,745 (Real Estate) 

$ 11,245.685 (Personal Property) 

$58.50 

James M. Shannon, Lawrence 
Carol C. Amick, Bedford 

Bruce N. Freeman, Chelmsford 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday 1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 10:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00-8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Saturday in April 12 Precincts 

Last Monday in April McCarthy Jr. High 

Mondays 7:30 p.m. Town Hall 

Every other Tuesday 8:00 p.m. High School 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Wed. every month Town Hall 

7:30 p.m. -4th Thursday every month Town Hall 

8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tues. every month Town Hall 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Mon. every month Town Hall 

7:30 p.m. -1st Tuesday every month 1 Smith Street 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 

(Term Expires 1981) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
(Term Expires 1981) 



Board of Selectmen 

Joseph P. Shanahan, Jr. Term Expired 1980 

John W. Carson Term Expires 1981 

Bonita Towle Term Expires 1982 

Bradford O. Emerson Term Expires 1982 

Paul C . Hart Term Expires 1983 

DennisJ. Ready Term Expires 1983 

Treasurer & Tax Collector 

James R. Doukszewicz Term Expires 1981 



Board of Assessors 



Janet Lombard 
Julian H. Zabierek 
Ruth K. Delaney 



Term Expires 1981 
Term Expires 1982 
Term Expires 1983 



Cemetery Commissioners 

Arthur J. Colmer Term Expires 1981 

Everett V. Olsen Term Expires 1982 

Gerald L. Hardy Term Expires 1 983 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 

Richard L. Monahan Term Expires 1981 

Claude A. Harvey Term Expires 1982 

Robert L. Hughes Term Expires 1983 

Pamela Turnbull Term Expires 1983 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1985 



Board of Health 



Peter Dulchinos 
Paul F. McCarthy 
Paul J. Canniff 



Term Expires 1981 
Term Expires 1982 
Term Expires 1 983 



Park Commissioners 

Arthur Bennett Term Expires 1981 

Robert L. Wetmore Term Expires 1982 

Eileen Duffy Term Expires 1983 



Paul F. Bartel 
Thomas Firth 
Eugene Gilet 
Rosalind M. Boyle 
Charles A. Parlee 
H.R. Johnson, Jr. 
Carolyn J. Fenn 
Ann McCarthy 



Planning Board 



Term Expired 1980 
Term Expires 1981 
Term Expires 1981 
Term Expires 1982 
Term Expires 1982 
Term Expires 1982 
Term Expires 1983 
Term Expires 1983 



School Committee 

Stanley W. Norkunas Term Expired 1980 

William K. Sharpley, Jr. Resigned 1980 

Carol C. Cleven Term Expires 1981 

John W. Peters Term Expires 1981 

Myra Silver Term Expires 1 982 

Kenneth C. Taylor Term Expires 1983 

Edward H. Hilliard Term Expires 1983 

Sewer Commissioners 
Charles L. Weaver Term Expired 1980 

DennisJ. Ready Term Expires 1981 

Burton A. Segall Term Expires 1 982 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1983 

Trustees of Public Libraries 



Dennis E. McHugh 
Elizabeth McCarthy 
Dr. Howard K. Moore 
James W. Cooper 
Roger P. Welch 
Brenda M. McDermott 
Janet B. Hendl 



William E. Spence 



Donald P. Gray 



Constable 



Tree Warden 



Term Expired 1980 
Term Expires 1981 
Term Expires 1981 
Term Expires 1982 
Term Expires 1 982 
Term Expires 1983 
Term Expires 1 983 



Term Expires 1983 



Term Expires 1981 



Varney Playground Commissioners 

(Elected at Town Meeting) 

HarryJ. Ayotte Term Expires 1981 

Robert C. McManimon Term Expires 1982 

Bernard Battle Term Expires 1983 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



The Board of Selectmen met on Monday, April 7, 1980 
following the Town Election and elected Paul C. Hart as 
Chairman, Bonita Towle as Vice Chairman and John W. 
Carson as Clerk. In addition to Selectman Bradford O. 
Emerson, who was elected in 1979, the Board welcomed 
its newest member Dennis J. Ready. 

Highlights of the year's activities are as follows: 

On January 2, 1980 Norman Thidemann was ap- 
pointed as the first Executive Secretary to the Board of 
Selectmen. The appointment was made per Massachu- 
setts General Laws, Chapter 41 , Section 23A. On January 
19, 1980 a Special Town Meeting was called to approve 
retroactive pay increases for Fire, Police, Highway and 
Cemetery Department Personnel. 

During February Harold Gray was appointed Highway 
Superintendent to replace the retiring Louis Rondeau. 
Also during the month bus service under the auspices of 
the Lowell Regional Transit Authority began. 

During March Ronald Wetmore was appointed Build- 
ing Inspector, replacing the late Peter J. McHugh, Jr., 
and in the Police Department Raymond McKeon was ap- 
pointed Chief, Pennryn Fitts was appointed Deputy 
Chief-Operations, and James C. Greska was appointed 
Deputy Chief-Administration. 

April brought "Yellow Ribbon Day" for the Iranian 
hostages and a hearing was held at the McCarthy Junior 
High School Cafeteria on the use of the Middlesex County 
Training School property. In protest to a lack of action 
by the County, the Board of Selectmen decided to with- 
hold the County Assessment. Also during April the Board 
of Selectmen received word that their application for 
$632,000 in Economic Development Administration 



funds for energy conservation work at McFarlin and 
Town Hall had received preliminary approval. The An- 
nual Town Meeting commenced the end of April and ad- 
journed in early May. May also brought the annual Gypsy 
Moth invasion, which continued into June. 

On July 1, 1980 the Town began to use a private con- 
tractor (BFI) for residential rubbish collection. Also dur- 
ing July the HUD Vinal Square Grant began in full 
operation. 

During August final approval was received on the 
$632,000 EDA grant and specifications for bids for that 
work were prepared. Also during August the demolition 
of the Westlands "B" Building was completed. 

The franchise for Cable TV was awarded to Lowell 
Cable TV Co., and a Cable TV Commission was ap- 
pointed to monitor the installation of the system during 
September. The Board of Selectmen also voted in Oc- 
tober not to pay the County Assessment due to the inac- 
tion of the County Commissioners relative to the sale of 
the County Training Sale. 

At the November State and National Elections Ronald 
Reagan was elected President of the United States and 
Proposition 2V£ voted in by nearly two-thirds of the 
Town's voters. Due to the immediate excise tax loss the 
Selectmen requested an immediate 3% cut back in the 
current operating budgets (Fiscal 1981) and a projected 
15% cut in the Fiscal 1982 budgets. During the month of 
December the contract for the renovations of the old 
High School into municipal office space was awarded to 
C.Q_. Construction Co. of Newton. 

The accomplishments of the Departments under the 
jurisdiction of the Board of Selectmen are contained in 



their respective sections in this Annual Town Report. 

The Board of Selectmen continued their active role in 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, the Middlesex 
County Selectmen's Association, the Middlesex County 
Advisory Board, the Northern Middlesex Area Commis- 
sion, and the Massachusetts Municipal Association. In- 
dividual selectmen also served as liaisons between the 
Board of Selectmen and various town and regional 
boards and commissions during the year. 

Due to the fact that National and State legislative deci- 
sions have a great impact on Town affairs, the Board 
maintained constant contact with Congressman 
Shannon's office as well as with Senator Carol Amick and 
State Representative Bruce Freeman. The Selectmen 
wish to express their gratitude to Congressman Shannon, 
Senator Amick and Representative Freeman for their 
help and cooperation during the past year. 

In closing, the Selectmen, on behalf of the citizens of 
Chelmsford, wish to express their sincere gratitude to the 
various Town boards and committees for their accom- 
plishments during the past year. It should be remem- 
bered that these boards and committees are composed of 
unpaid volunteers who take many long hours out of their 
free time to work on issues and projects that benefit the 
Town of Chelmsford. 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth D. Zamanakos, Ass't. Town Clerk 



Sporting 

Licenses 

1117 



Dog 

Licenses 
2222 



Kennel 
Licenses 



Marriage 

Licenses 

229 



Recorded 

Mortgages etc. 

403 



Births (Inc.) 
287 



Marriage 
Intentions 

223 



Deaths 
212 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

January 19, 1980 



1. Line Item 139 Officers and Administration 

2. Line Item 140 Regular and Special Account 

3. Line Item 142 Maintenance and Equipment; or act 
in relation thereto. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Board of Selectmen 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Auditorium on Saturday Morning, the nineteenth 
day of January, 1980, at 11:00 o'clock in the forenoon, 
then and there to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to the following named account: Highway 
Department Line Item 94 Labor— Men; or act in relation 
thereto. 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to further in- 
crease the appropriations and budget limit established 
under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 so that the Town's 
appropriations and budget limit for fiscal year 1 980 shall 
be a certain sum of money; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 3rd day of January, A.D. 
1980. 

Paul C. Hart, Chairman 

Joseph B. Shanahan.Jr. 

John W. Carson 

Bonita A. Towle 

Bradford O. Emerson 



Board of Selectmen 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to the following named account in the 
Cemetery Department: Line Item 32 General Labor; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to the following named account in the Fire 
Department: 

1. Line Item 66 Officers and Administration 

2. Line Item 67 Regular and Substitute Account; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to the following named accounts in the 
Police Department: 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



January 3, 1980 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Center School Auditorium; North Elementary 
School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker Junior High 
School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam 
School Cafetorium; Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCar- 
thy Junior High School; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House-Old Westford 
Road, fourteen days at least before the time appointed 
for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

January 19, 1980 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 1 1 :00 
AM by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr., who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 316 
voters present. Selectman Hart moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Select- 
man Hart moved that the reading of the entire warrant 
be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silence in the 
memory of Peter J. McHugh Jr., Building Inspector for 
the Town of Chelmsford, who passed away January 16th. 
The Moderator asked for this acknowledgement to be 
recorded by the Town Clerk into the minutes of this 
meeting. 

The Moderator explained to the Town Meeting body 
that the following articles were approved by the Finance 
Committee and that the Selectmen have bargained in 
good faith with the different unions. All of these amounts 
will be by transfer from free cash. The Moderator ex- 
plained that he would read the individual articles and at- 
tempt for a unanimous voice vote on articles one through 
five. If a unanimous voice vote is not obtained, then all 
the articles will be taken up and voted on individually. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to transfer from free cash the sum of 
$6,100.00 for the following named account: Highway 
Department Line Item 94 Labor — Men. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to transfer from free cash the sum of 
$1,400.00 to the following named account in the 
Cemetery Department: Line Item 32 General Labor. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to transfer from free cash the sum of 
$23,203.00 to the following named accounts in the Fire 
Department: Line Item 67 Regular and Substitute Ac- 
count. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to transfer from free cash the sum of 
$15,000.00 to the following named accounts in the Police 
Department in the following manner: 

1. Line Item 139 Officer and Administration, 
$7,500.00 

2. Line Item 140 Regular and Special Account, 
$7,500.00 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to further increase the appropriation limit and 
budget limit established under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 
1979 by the specific amount of $45,703.00. 

A question was asked concerning the percentages of 7 , 
10, 7, increases. Selectman Hart explained that these 
figures to be voted on at this meeting are only for this 
fiscal year. The Annual Town Meeting budgets will 
reflect the remaining contract figures, and to be voted on 
then. 



A voice vote was taken on articles one through five. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator declared the meeting adjourned Sine 
die. Motion carried, unanimously. The meeting adjourn- 
ed at 11:10 AM. 



DanielJ. Coughlin Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 
PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote 
at: 

Precinct 1 . Center School Auditorium 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Colonel Moses Parker Junior High School 

Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 11. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House - Old Westford Road 

TUESDAY, THE FOURTH DAY OF MARCH, 1980 
from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the 
candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

DISTRICT MEMBERS OF STATE COMMITTEE (One 
Man and One Woman for Each Political Party for the 
Fifth Middlesex Senatorial District) 

Thirty-five (35) Members of the DEMOCRATIC TOWN 
COMMITTEE 

Thirty-five (35) Members of the REPUBLICAN TOWN 
COMMITTEE 

The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 



Given under our hands this 1 1th day of February, A.D. 
1980. 

Paul C. Hart, Chairman 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr., Vice Chairman 

John W. Carson, Clerk 

Bonita A. Towle 

Bradford O. Emerson 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. February 14, 1980 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Center School Auditorium; North Elementary 
School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker Junior High 
School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam 
School Cafetorium; Small Gymnasium; C. Edith McCar- 
thy Junior High School; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House- Old Westford 
Road, seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 
March 4, 1980 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

John B. Anderson 
Howard H. Baker 
George H. Bush 
John B. Connally 
Ronald W. Reagan 
Robert J. Dole 
Benjamin Fernandez 
Harold Stassen 
Philip M. Crane 
No Preference 
Write-in 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN 

Joseph Daniel Malone 

Paul F.X. Powers 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet II 



t 12 


TOTAL 


103 


817 


16 


228 


103 


1047 


1 


45 


124 


1035 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 

Paula K. Lewellen 
Janet F. Bonica 
Write-in 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

TOWN COMMITTEE 

Janet F. Bonica 
Frances F. Campbell 
Nancy P. Clark 
Ivor K. Clements 
Marian D. Currier 
Philip L. Currier 
Francis S. dejager 
Melvin P. dejager 
John P. Fawcett 
Bruce N. Freeman 
John S. Fudge, Jr. 
Rita M. Gamache 
Ina B. Greenblatt 
Claude A. Harvey 
Edward H. Hilliard 
John F. Ketcham 
Charles S. Koulas 
Verton W. Lenfest 
David J. McLachlan 
Florence E. Morrison 
Raymond T. Osborn 
Halvar P. Peterson 
Edith M. Previte 
Byron D. Roseman 
Donald S. Savage 
Richard F. Scott 
Anne Lise Sexton 
Robert M. Sexton Jr. 
Myra Silver 
Josephine A. Tambo 
Nicholas Theochares 
Marguerite Waldron 
Eleanor R. Wood 
Robert F. Wood 
William V. York 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



589 
2234 



241 


36 


284 


196 


31 


230 


206 


30 


242 


192 


30 


224 


200 


35 


244 


223 


33 


256 


186 


31 


225 


185 


30 


223 


203 


29 


226 


279 


43 


306 


190 


32 


230 


205 


31 


230 


203 


27 


227 


207 


35 


254 


204 


32 


232 


191 


29 


225 


191 


30 


231 


185 


28 


218 


193 


30 


221 


189 


33 


230 


197 


33 


225 


206 


33 


225 


206 


29 


234 


238 


32 


234 


187 


30 


221 


195 


30 


225 


204 


31 


242 


202 


30 


237 


213 


31 


251 


193 


30 


227 


189 


29 


232 


211 


30 


226 


197 


31 


225 


193 


30 


226 


194 


31 


230 


5646 


1355 


6377 


12740 


2450 


14595 



273 
224 



3041 
6930 



4334 
10850 



229 


2223 


187 


1807 


201 


1885 


185 


1751 


202 


1941 


210 


2038 


186 


1766 


184 


1744 


194 


1778 


255 


2512 


187 


1833 


201 


1834 


205 


1858 


208 


2008 


196 


1822 


183 


1741 


206 


1810 


181 


1702 


188 


1766 


184 


1756 


191 


1836 


193 


1834 


187 


1773 


217 


1991 


182 


1720 


189 


1796 


198 


1835 


192 


1799 


207 


1952 


195 


1757 


184 


1750 


201 


1810 


188 


1776 


188 


1778 


186 


1783 


5695 


50945 


12565 


115710 



10 

DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 4, 1980 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

Jimmy Carter 
Edmund G. Brown Jr. 
Edward M. Kennedy 
No Preference 
Write-in Space 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN 

Michael T. Cunningham 

Joseph R. Fallo 

Henry J. Joyal Jr. 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 

Sally H. Lunt 

Virginia E. Mooney 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

TOWN COMMITTEE 

Dorothy G. Borrows 
Ruth K. Delaney 
Kenneth Demers 
Matthew J. Doyle Jr. 
Stratos G. Dukakis 
Carolyn J. Fabien 
Alyce Fallon 
Edward A. Fallon 
Margaret C. Fox 
James M. Geary Jr. 
James M. Harrington 
Louise M. Harrington 
Daniel J. Hart 
Walter L. Kivlan III 
Mary H. Long 
Thomas F. Markham Jr. 
Mary E. McCarthy 
Paul F. McCarthy 
Dolores E. McGuire 
Raymond P. McKeon 
Mary B. McNally 
Carl A. Olsson 
Judith A. Olsson 
Jack Peake 
Emily A. Peake 
Dennis J. Ready 
John P. Rourke 
Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Joseph B. Shanahanjr. 
Charles K. Spear 
Richard J. Sullivan 
Pamela Tumbull 
Edmund J. Welch 
M. Angelique White 
Mary E. White 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



Pet 3 

235 



Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 



Pet 12 TOTAL 



2854 
447 



85 


46 


135 


41 


114 


106 


69 


72 


84 


115 


78 


113 


1058 


160 


195 


282 


164 


255 


228 


192 


146 


177 


285 


228 


228 


2540 


6 











16 








1 














23 


126 


70 


167 


62 


108 


89 


73 


89 


91 


148 


73 


134 


1230 


377 


311 


584 


267 


493 


423 


334 


308 


352 


548 


379 


475 


4851 


191 


162 


319 


137 


267 


218 


180 


176 


179 


280 


204 


264 


2577 


220 


187 


333 


158 


277 


268 


192 


188 


195 


305 


269 


292 


2884 


194 


159 


321 


139 


260 


216 


189 


174 


189 


273 


193 


271 


2578 


196 


158 


321 


137 


267 


237 


180 


170 


184 


289 


206 


254 


2599 


201 


169 


337 


133 


275 


232 


184 


176 


195 


287 


212 


293 


2694 


185 


155 


301 


126 


247 


214 


174 


155 


185 


274 


188 


240 


2444 


188 


171 


315 


131 


248 


213 


196 


160 


170 


275 


196 


251 


2514 


191 


179 


308 


129 


249 


215 


196 


162 


170 


270 


197 


250 


2516 


193 


154 


311 


132 


257 


216 


180 


160 


182 


294 


194 


243 


2516 


239 


186 


345 


143 


286 


251 


191 


188 


206 


314 


231 


284 


2864 


206 


173 


331 


151 


277 


241 


191 


178 


188 


299 


224 


264 


2723 


206 


159 


324 


140 


261 


224 


180 


167 


188 


285 


219 


248 


2601 


231 


193 


347 


157 


272 


256 


205 


189 


203 


324 


235 


280 


2892 


200 


168 


326 


135 


256 


280 


182 


169 


178 


278 


229 


267 


2668 


204 


174 


320 


133 


259 


243 


187 


169 


182 


283 


245 


255 


2564 


210 


181 


353 


157 


274 


246 


190 


197 


190 


298 


217 


274 


2787 


188 


158 


307 


139 


250 


228 


178 


169 


179 


278 


218 


248 


2540 


203 


161 


323 


130 


264 


221 


180 


169 


182 


278 


196 


258 


2565 


188 


158 


314 


131 


247 


216 


172 


171 


176 


267 


195 


249 


2484 


213 


199 


338 


148 


265 


265 


203 


191 


194 


290 


226 


277 


2809 


196 


160 


307 


138 


257 


236 


180 


160 


182 


269 


213 


252 


2550 


190 


160 


313 


131 


254 


233 


185 


167 


172 


279 


219 


247 


2550 


189 


155 


312 


131 


258 


231 


181 


170 


179 


277 


221 


248 


2552 


189 


155 


302 


151 


248 


201 


181 


163 


184 


271 


198 


237 


2480 


186 


157 


305 


153 


252 


218 


182 


165 


187 


273 


203 


242 


2513 


202 


161 


319 


126 


268 


228 


177 


175 


181 


285 


210 


264 


2596 


194 


161 


313 


138 


252 


225 


179 


166 


184 


272 


224 


237 


2545 


232 


196 


365 


153 


303 


282 


209 


207 


215 


329 


271 


290 


3052 


228 


186 


343 


152 


295 


251 


200 


189 


214 


317 


229 


273 


2877 


184 


152 


324 


127 


240 


208 


177 


158 


165 


255 


186 


242 


2418 


193 


165 


313 


139 


265 


221 


179 


159 


181 


280 


199 


249 


2543 


184 


149 


308 


127 


246 


211 


177 


157 


184 


266 


188 


239 


2436 


195 


171 


299 


129 


244 


236 


188 


163 


173 


264 


203 


231 


2496 


180 


148' 


299 


128 


239 


209 


173 


161 


170 


264 


198 


234 


2403 


196 


168 


323 


139 


259 


269 


181 


170 


181 


273 


221 


257 


2637 


6210 


5037 


9201 


4497 


8117 


6656 


5211 


4772 


5853 


9265 


5788 


7621 


78228 


13195 


10885 


20440 


9345 


17255 


14805 


11690 


10780 


12320 


19180 


13265 


16625 


169785 



11 



WARRANT FOR 

THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 5, 1980 and April 28, 1980 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 

Precinct 1 . Center School Auditorium 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Parker Junior High Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. McCarthy Junior High School, 

Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 1 1 . Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House- Old Westford Road 

On Saturday, the fifth day of April, 1980, being the 
first Saturday in said month, at 8:00 A.M., for the follow- 
ing purposes: 

To bring in their vote for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years 

One Treasurer and Tax Collector for one year to fill 
vacancy 

One Member of the Board of Assessors for three years 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

One Member of Housing Authority for five years 

One Member of Housing Authority for two years to fill 
vacancy 

One Member of Housing Authority for two years to fill 
vacancy 

One Member of Board of Health for three years 

One Park Commissioner for three years 

Two Members Planning Board for three years 

Two Members School Committee for three years 

One Sewer Commissioner for three years 



Two Trustees of Public Library for three years 

One Constable for three years 

And to vote on the following question: 

QUESTION: 

"Shall the Town vote to accept the provisions 
of section thirteen of Chapter two hundred 
and fifty-eight of the General Laws which 
provides that the Town shall indemnify and 
save harmless municipal officers, elected or 
appointed, from personal financial loss and Yes □ 
expense including reasonable legal fees and 
costs, if any, in an amount not to exceed one No □ 
million dollars, arising out of any claim, de- 
mand, suit or judgment by reason of any act 
or omission except an intentional violation of 
civil rights of any person under any law, if the 
official at the time of such act or omission was 
acting within the scope of his official duties or 
employment?" 

The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.; and 
to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School Gymnasium 
on Monday, the twenty-eighth (28th) day of April, 1980, 
at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there to act 
upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To hear reports of Town Officers and 
Committees; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-Laws as follows: 

1. Under Section 14 subtitled "Vacations" by inserting 
the following as the first sentence: 

"Vacation leave shall be granted 
to part-time regular employees 
with a work schedule of twenty 
(20) or more hours a week on a 
pro-rated basis." 

2. Under Section 8 subtitled "Increases Within Grade 
Levels and Promotions" by adding the following as 
Subsection (a): 

"(a) Newly hired employees and 
employees who are promoted or 
placed in a new position shall be 
given a performance evaluation 
upon completion of six (6) months 
in the new position. These 
employees may be recommended 
for a merit increase at this time. 
Such increases must be recom- 
mended by the employee's depart- 
ment head and approved by the 
Personnel Board." 

3. Under Section 8 subtitled "Increases Within Grade 
Levels and Promotions" by re-lettering Subsection 
(a) to Subsection (b) and adding the following 
sentence: 



12 



"Such increases are to be based on 
the employee's job performance 
and development during the pre- 
vious year." 

4. Under Section 8 re-letter the Subsections as follows: 
(b) to be (c); (c) to be (d); and (cc) to be (e). 

5. Under Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Stan- 
dard Rates For Wages and Salaries Of The Person- 
nel Wage and Salary By-Law" by deleting there- 
from the following positions: 

Administrative and Clerical: Line 6, Selectmen's 
Administrative Assistant; Recreation: Line 2, Sum- 
mer Director; Youth Center: Line 1 , Youth Center 
Coordinator; 

And further amending Section 24 by adding the 
following positions: 

Library: Line 13, Maintenance Assistant; Recrea- 
tion: Line 1, Director/Youth Center Coordinator; 
Line 9, Lifeguard. 

6. Under Section 6 subtitled "Classification of Present 
Town Employees" amend Subsection (g)-"Wage 
and Salary Schedule" to read as follows: 

Wage and Salary Schedule 
July 1, 1978 - June 30, 1981 



Grade Level 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 

or act in relation thereto. 



Salary Range 

$ 6,800-9,384 
7,820-10,792 
8,840-12,199 
9,860-13,607 
10,880-15,014 
11,900-16,422 
12,920-17,830 
13,940-19,237 
14,960-20,645 
15,980-22,052 
17,000-23,460 
18,020-24,868 
19,040-26,275 
20,060-27,683 
21,080-29,090 
22,100-30,498 
23,120-31,906 
24,140-33,313 
25,160-34,721 
26,180-36,128 



Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 2A. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law as follows: 

1. Under Section 3 subtitled "Personnel Board", 
delete the fourth paragraph in its entirety and 
substitute the following in its place: 



"No member of the Personnel 
Board shall be an elected official 
of the Town of Chelmsford." 

2. Under Section 3 subtitled "Personnel Board", 
the following paragraph as paragraph 4: 

"All members of the Personnel 
Board shall be registered voters of 
the Town of Chelmsford. Town 
employees who are subject to this 
By-Law, voting in Personnel 
Board elections, shall be register- 
ed voters of the Town of Chelms- 
ford, and an official voting list 
shall be used at all elections to 
determine the eligibility of each 
employee to vote."; 



add 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 2B. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law, Section 7, sub- 
titled "Hiring of New Employees", by deleting Sub- 
paragraph 7(a) in its entirety and substituting the follow- 
ing in its place: 

"The wage or salary of a new 
employee may be set by an Ap- 
pointed or Elected Board at any 
step within the level established by 
the Personnel Board."; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2C. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law by further amen- 
ding Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Standard Rates 
for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary 
By-Law", to conform to rates of pay negotiated by the 
Town with certain labor organizations, pursuant to 
General Laws, Chapter 150E. 

7/79-6/80 7/79-6/80 
Current Proposed Proposed 
Administrative 8c Clerical Level Level Salary 

1 . Veteran's Agent 8 8 

2. Clerk, Senior 4 4 

3. Town Accountant 12 12 

4. Assistant Treasurer 5 5 

5. Town Counsel — — $ 500 p. a. 

6. Executive Secretary 15 15 

7 . Board of Registrars' Clerk 850 p. a. 

8. Board of Reg. , three members — 360 ea. 

9. Clerk Part-time 2 2 

10. Town Aide 5 To Be Proposed 

at Town Meeting 

1 1 . Assistant Town Clerk 5 5 

Conservation, 'Parks & Cemetery 

1 . Cemetery Superintendent 9 9 

2. Supt. of Insect. & Pest Cont — — 1,250 p. a. 

3. Landscaper • Park 2 2 

4. Laborer - Park 1 1 

5. Unskilled Laborer *#4, #2. #4, #2 



13 



6. Skilled Forest Workman - Cons 1 

7. Equipment Operator 4 

8. Park Superintendent 9 

Custodial 

1 . Custodian 2 

Library 

1 . Library Director 12 

2. Library Asst. Director 7 

3. Branch Librarian 5 

4. Librarian. Dept. Head 2 

5. Library Specialist - Bkkpr 3 

6. Library Specialist - Catalgr 3 

7. Library Specialist - Ref. Lib 3 

8. Library Specialist * Sec./Rec 3 

9. Librarian Assistants 1 

10. Librarian Clerk 1 

11. Aides '#2 

12. Supervisor - Maintenance 4 

13. Maintenance Assistant 2 

Highway Department 

1 . Highway Superintendent 12 

2. Highway Foreman 9 

Town Fire Department 

1. FireChief *2, #5 

2. Deputy Fire Chief "2, #6 

3. Mechanic (Fire & Police) 6 

Town Police Department 

1 . Police Chief 20 

2. Deputy Chief 18 

3. Captain 16 

Recreation 

1. Director/Youth Center Coord — 

2. Clerk. Part-time 2 



3. Swimming Director 

4. Swimming Instructor 

5. Playground Director 

6. Playground Supervisor 

7. Playground Instructor 

8. Sports Instructor 

9. Lifeguard 

Youth Center 



Minimum 

$76.40 wk. 
76.40 wk. 
76.40 wk. 
76.40 wk. 
76.40 wk. 
76.40 wk. 
76.40 wk. 



1 . Youth Center Supervisor 

2. Clerk- Youth 

Miscellaneous 

1 . Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3. Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 

5. Sealer of Weights & Measures 

6. Dog Officer 

7. Assistant Dog Officer 

8. Clock Winder 

9. Local Inspector 

Footnotes 

*#1 - Represented by Collective Bargaining 

*#2 - Not in "Job Rating Plan" 

*#3 - No percentage increase - range only 

*#4 - Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

*#5 - Salary will be 200% of the highest paid i 

established by State Law 

•#6 - Salary will be 84% of the Fire Chief 



or act in relation thereto. 



•#2. #5 
*#2, #6 



To Be Proposed 
at Town Meeting 



Maximum 

$109.20 wk. 
109.20 wk. 
109.20 wk. 
109.20 wk. 
109.20 wk. 
109.20 wk. 
109.20 wk. 



To Be Proposed 
At Town Meeting 



. firefighti 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of money as may be required to 
defray town charges for the fiscal period from July 1, 
1980 to June 30, 1981; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Town Treasurer 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1980; in 
accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Town Treasurer 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to request 
the Department of Revenue, Division of Accounts of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to make an audit of all 
accounts in all departments of the Town of Chelmsford; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Town Treasurer 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money with which to meet 
bills for previous years; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County 
Retirement System, the said amount being the Town's 
share of the pension, expense and military service funds; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discre- 
tion of the Finance Committee, as provided in General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Finance Committee 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the 
balance of $7,683.00 from an authorized original transfer 
of $63,000.00 from the Stabilization Fund as voted under 
Article 37 (Highway Department Equipment Purchase) 
at the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting held on May 16, 
1977; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Personnel Board 



Board of Selectmen 



14 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $7,000.00 from the Sale of Graves and Lots to 
Cemetery Improvement Development Fund; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Cemetery Commissioners 



ARTICLE 1 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to pay reasonable hospital, medical and 
surgical, chiropractic, nursing, pharmaceutical, pro- 
sthetic and related expenses, and reasonable charges for 
podiatry, pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 41 , Sec- 
tion 100B, for certain retired Police Officers and 
Firefighters as classified under Chapter 41, Section 100B 
of the Massachusetts General Laws accepted by vote of 
the 1979 Annual Town Meeting; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the 
purpose of providing mutual aid programs for the Police 
Department; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1 ,800.00 to be used to join or buy into the Elder Services 
of the Merrimack Valley, Inc., for the purpose of obtain- 
ing services for the care of the Town's Older Americans; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$99,958.00 for Chapter 90 Construction under Chapter 
356, Section 2b, Acts of 1977; 



sum of money for the purchase of a new 1,000 gallon 
Pumping Engine for the Fire Department, said purchase 
to be made under the supervision of the Board of Select- 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or appropriate from the Stabilization Fund 
or transfer from available funds a certain sum of money 
for the purchase of equipment for the Highway Depart- 
ment, such purchase to be made under the supervision of 
the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to dispose of equipment presently being used 
by the Highway Department as follows: 

(a) To purchase one (1) Pickup Truck for the 
Highway Department and to sell by good and suf- 
ficient bill of sale one (1) Pickup Truck presently 
being used by the Highway Department. 

(b) To purchase one (1) Two Yard Front End Loader 
for the Highway Department and to sell by good 
and sufficient bill of sale one (1) Front End 
Loader presently being used by the Highway 
Department. 

(c) To purchase one (1) Dump Truck for the 
Higl-way Department and to sell by good and suf- 
ficient bill of sale one (1) Dump Truck presently 
being used by the Highway Department. 

(d) To sell by good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) 
truck and sander body presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

(e) To purchase one (1 ) Sander Body for the Highway 
Department. 

(f) To purchase one (1) Air Compressor for the 
Highway Department (Stationary type for 
Garage); 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of installing a new 10,000 
gallon fiberglass gas tank, a new gas pump and up-grade 
the existing storage fill and venting system at the Police 
Station to comply with current E.P.A. regulations; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale equipment presently being used by the Highway 
Department; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of renovating certain por- 
tions of the Highway Garage to provide Highway Depart- 
ment Administrative offices; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



15 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to purchase one (1) Industrial Type Tag-a- 
long Equipment Trailer for the Park Department, said 
purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board 
of Selectmen; 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to implement the recommendations of the 
Pedestrian Safety Committee; 

or act in relation thereto. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of purchasing seven (7) new 
1981 four door sedans and one (1) new 1981 four door 
station wagon to be used by the Police Department, said 
purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board 
of Selectmen, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
transfer by good and sufficient bill of sale, title to six (6) 
1980, one (1) 1979 and one (1) 1976 cruisers now being 
used by the Police Department; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be expended for the timely alleviation of 
the Gypsy Moth infestation in affected areas of the Town; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of eradicating mosquitoes 
by means of aerial spraying or other appropriate means, 
under the supervision of the Board of Health; 

or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of resurfacing portions of 
certain streets throughout the Town with Type I 
Bituminous Concrete; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to alleviate certain drainage problems 
throughout the Town, under the supervision of the Board 
of Selectmen; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the renovation of the McFarlin School 
"A" building to be used as Town Offices; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the repair or rehabilitation of the Town 
parking lot at Vinal Square; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase and installation of a 
guard rail at a hazardous curve on Main Street at Wilson 
Lane; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be expended by the Committee to Up- 
date Town History under the supervision of the Board of 
Selectmen, for the publication of an updated History of 
the Town; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to contract with a firm for the purpose of 
equalization of real estate values in preparation for im- 
plementation of Chapter 797 of the Acts of 1979, the 
Classification Amendment; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Assessors 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to establish 
a Town Energy Committee for the following purposes: 1. 
to centralize responsibility for all town public use and ex- 
penditure of energy; 2. to establish programs directed 
toward the more efficient use of energy in Chelmsford by 



16 



government, industry, business and individual; 3. to 
represent the Town in establishing Town participation in 
other government and industrial energy conservation or 
conversion programs; 4. to establish townwide criteria 
and rules and regulations for energy usage and conserva- 
tion; 5. to recommend to the Town where needed 
changes in the Town By-Laws to enhance the energy effi- 
ciency of the Town; and 6. to assist the citizens of the 
Town in times of energy emergencies and establish con- 
tingency plans to decrease the impact of adverse energy 
situations; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to fund the Town Energy Committee; 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article VII - "Miscellaneous" by ad- 
ding the following section: 

"Section 8 - Licensing of Dogs 

Any person who fails to pay the required licens- 
ing fees as set forth in Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 140 on or before June 10 of any 
year shall, prior to the issuance of any license, 
pay a penalty fee of $1 .00 in addition to all other 
licensing fees due. This penalty shall not apply to 
any person who, during any licensing period, 
becomes the owner or keeper of a dog three mon- 
ths old or over or to the owner or keeper of a dog 
that becomes three months old during the licens- 
ing period, provided the licensing fee is paid 
within thirty (30) days of such event."; 

or act in relation thereto. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article 1 - "General Provisions" 
-Section 3 - "Town Meeting Rules of Order" - Subsection 
2 - "Quorum Requirements" by deleting paragraph 2.2 
and substituting the following in its place: 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Law as follows: 

1. Amend Article III - "General Regulations" - Sec- 
tion 3300 by adding the following subparagraph 
under Subsection 3320 - "Signs Permitted in 
Residential Districts"; 



"A quorum of at least 300 registered voters eligi- 
ble to vote must be present to legally open any 
and all Special Town Meetings for the transac- 
tion of Town business. Upon the opening of the 
Special Town Meeting by the prescribed 
quorum, there shall be no further requirement 
as to a quorum, and any number of registered 
voters eligible to vote may transact and consum- 
mate the business of the Town under the Special 
Town Meeting Warrant."; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article II - "Town Meeting" - Sec- 
tion 3 - "Town Meeting Rules of Order" - Subsection 3 
-"Order of Precedence of Motions" as follows: 

Delete within line (h), under column "Can be 
Reconsidered" the word "No" and substitute in 
its place the word "Yes."; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to direct the 
School Committee to establish the school transportation 
policy for the Town; 

or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 



"3325. One temporary unlighted sign not larger 
than twenty-five (25) square feet in an area in- 
dicating the name and address of the parties in- 
volved in construction on the premises. Requires 
no permit if not more than twelve (12) square 
feet in area and is removed within thirty (30) 
days of erection." 

2. Amend Article III - "General Regulations" 
-Subsection 3310 by deleting the entire first 
sentence of subparagraph 3311 and substituting the 
following in its place: 

"3311. Permits. No sign shall be erected, enlarg- 
ed or structurally altered without a sign permit 
issued by the Building Inspector, with the excep- 
tion of unlighted signs one square foot or smaller 
and temporary construction signs less than 
twelve (12) square feet in area. Temporary 
unlighted real estate signs require no sign permit 
if erecting agent has obtained a one-year permit 
from the Building Inspector for erecting such 
signs." 

3. Amend Article III - "General Regulations" under 
Subsection 3320 - "Signs Permitted in Residential 
Districts", subparagraph 3323 by adding the 
following: 

"These signs require no sign permit if erecting 
agent has obtained a one-year permit from the 
Building Inspector for erecting such signs." 

4. Amend Article III - "General Regulations" under 
Subsection 3330 - "Signs Permitted in Business 



17 



Districts", subparagraph 3336 by adding the 
following: 

"These signs require no sign permit if erecting 
agent has obtained a one-year permit from the 
Building Inspector for erecting such signs." 

5. Amend Article III - "General Regulations" 
-Subsection 3330 - "Signs Permitted in a Business 
District" - subparagraph 3335 by adding the follow- 
ing: 

"These signs require no sign permit if not more 
than twelve (12) square feet in area and are 
removed within thirty (30) days of erection." 

6. Amend Article III "General Regulations" 
-Subsection 3370 - "Sign Advisory Committee" - 
subparagraph 3371 by deleting the words "...one 
registered Architect or Landscape Architect..." 
from the second sentence of said Subsection and 
substituting in its place ". . .one person trained in ar- 
chitecture or landscape architecture..." 

7. Amend Article III - "General Regulations" 
-Subsection 3370 - "Sign Advisory Committee" - 
subparagraph 3372 by deleting the words "...within 
ten days from the date of referral..." from the se- 
cond sentence of said Subsection and substituting in 
its place "...within twenty-one days from the date of 
referral..." 

8. Amend Article V - "Definitions" by deleting 
paragraph "c" under the definition of sign and 
substituting in its place the following: 

"c. Temporary devices erected for a charitable 
or religious cause provided they are removed 
within seven (7) days of erection." 

9. Amend Article III - "General Regulations" by ad- 
ding the following subparagraph under Subsection 
3310 - "General Regulations": 

"3315. Identification. All signs approved by the 
Building Inspector will have an identifying 
number affixed to the face of the sign in the 
lower right hand corner, said numbers to be at 
least one inch in height."; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Law Article I, Section 1200 — "Adminis- 
tration", Subsection 1220 — "Compliance Certification" 
by adding the following sentence: 

"Any person failing to obtain a Building Permit 
from the Inspector of Buildings where required 
by these By-Laws or the State Building Code 
shall be punishable by a fine of $100.00 for each 
offense."; 

or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Law Article IV — "Special Regulations" — 
Section 4100 — "Accessory Uses and Structures" by adding 
the following Subsection: 

"Any willow tree found growing within 50 feet of 
any portion of a Town maintained drainage sys- 
tem, or within 50 feet of any drainage easement, 
whether granted to the Town by specific deed or 
included on a definitive plan submitted pursuant 
to the provisions of the Subdivision Control Law, 
is hereby declared to be a nuisance and it shall 
be unlawful to permit any such willow tree to 
grow or remain in any such location. It shall be 
the duty of the Inspector of Buildings to serve, or 
cause to be served, notice upon the owner of any 
premises on which willow trees are permitted to 
grow in violation of the provisions of this or- 
dinance and demand abatement of this nuisance 
within thirty (30) days"; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 41 . To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law as follows: 

1. In Section 2300 — "Use Regulations Schedule" 
delete the reference to footnote 4 at each entry 
where it appears opposite the following uses: Busi- 
ness, Professional Offices, Medical Center, Clinic 
and Funeral Home. 



2. Delete the first sentence of Section 4510- 
plicability" and substitute the following: 



"Ap- 



"Any premises having more than 10,000 square 
feet gross floor area devoted to retail stores or 
services (including motor vehicle), restaurant, 
fast food establishment, bank, finance agency, 
or indoor or outdoor commercial recreation shall 
be considered a Major Business Complex."; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Planning Board 



ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by deleting the present 
Zoning Map and substituting the redrafted Map propos- 
ed by the Planning Board, as filed with the Town Clerk, 
and displayed at the Town Meeting; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Planning Board 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law, Section 2700 — "Flood 
Plain District", as follows: 



1. Delete Section 2720- 
entirety. 



'District Definition", in its 



Board of Selectmen 



18 



2. Delete Section 2730 — "District Deliniations", in its 
entirety. 

3. Insert Section 2720 — "Flood Plain District and 
Floodway District Deliniations". 

The Flood Plain District and Floodway District is 
herein established as an overlay district. The underlying 
permitted uses are allowed provided that they meet the 
following additional requirements as well as those of the 
Massachusetts State Building Code dealing with construc- 
tions in floodplains. The Flood Plain District and Flood- 
way District includes all special flood hazard areas 
designated on the Chelmsford Flood Plain and Floodway 
District Map, dated 1980, on file with the Town Clerk, 
Planning Board and Building Inspector. These Maps as 
well as the accompanying Chelmsford Flood Insurance 
Study, dated December, 1979, are incorporated herein 
by reference. 

4. Insert Section 2742. In the floodway, designated on 
the Chelmsford Flood Plain and Floodway District 
Map, the following provisions shall apply. 

1. All encroachments, including, fill, new construc- 
tion, substantial improvements to existing struc- 
tures, and other development are prohibited unless 
certification by a registered professional engineer is 
provided by the applicant demonstrating that such 
encroachment shall not result in any increase in 
flood levels during the occurrence of the 100-year 
flood. 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the By-Laws Relating to the Use of Chelmsford Conserva- 
tion Reservations by adding to No. 2: 

"Without the express written consent of the Con- 
servation Commission, to be evidenced by a per- 
mit to be issued in the discretion of the Commis- 
sion upon proper application, and the holder of 
said permit to be subject to all conditions stated 
thereon."; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
the following mentioned streets as laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen and shown by their reports and plans duly 
filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and to raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of reconstructing the following 
mentioned streets: 

Progress Avenue 
Industrial Avenue 
Scientia Drive 
Hope Street 

Providing all construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such require- 
ments have been met; 



2. Any encroachment meeting the above standard 
shall comply with the floodplain requirements of 
the State Building Code.; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Planning Board 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
Section 2300 — "Use Regulations Schedule" of the Zoning 
By-Laws by adding thereto, after "Light Industry" in the 
category of "Industrial Uses," the following use: 

"Pedestrian and 

Vehicular Access and 

Egress by Private ra rb rc rm ca cb cc cd ia is 

Way to and from 



Uses Permitted in an IA o o o o o pb o o p o 
District."; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Planning Board 



ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to delete the 
following Section from the Town's Zoning By-Laws: 

"Section 3253: No process shall be used which 
creates visual or audible interference in any 
radio or television receivers off the premises or 
causes fluctuation in excess of ten percent in line 
voltage off the premises; 

or act in relation thereto. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey all right, title and in- 
terest, if any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of 
land, for consideration to be determined, in a parcel of 
land and buildings thereon, if any, located on Dover 
Street and Shore Drive, Plat 45, Lot 18, containing ap- 
proximately 6,750 square feet; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Board of Assessors to issue a certain sum of money 
from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
tax rate for the current fiscal period; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Finance Committee 



ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law, Section 2300 — Use Reg- 
ulations Schedule, Business Uses, Restaurant, in a CA 
District (Neighborhood Commercial) by deleting O and 
inserting P and adding Footnote 5 to such insertion as 
follows: 



19 



"5. Maximum seating capacity shall be thirty 
(30) and no alcoholic beverages shall be sold or 
consumed on the premises."; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 51 . To see if the Town will vote to exempt a 
specified amount of Free Cash from the provisions of Sec- 
tion 12A of Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979, and that 
such Free Cash not be utilized for the purpose of reducing 
the property tax levy in Fiscal 1981; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Finance Committee 



ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to further 
increase the budget limit established under Chapter 151 
of the Acts of 1979 for the School Department so that the 
School Department Budget for Fiscal Year 1981 shall be 
established at a certain sum of money; 



or act in relation thereto. 



School Committee 



ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to further 
increase the appropriations and budget limit established 
under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 so that the Town's 
appropriations and budget limit for Fiscal Year 1981 
shall be a certain sum of money; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 24th day of March, A.D. 
1980. 

Paul C. Hart, Chairman 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

John W. Carson 

Bonita A. Towle 

Bradford O. Emerson 



days at least before the time appointed for holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 5, 1980 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Gymnasium on Monday Evening, the fifth day of 
May, 1980, at 8:00 o'clock P.M., then and there to act 
upon the following Articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of renovating the McFarlin 
School to be used as Town Offices: 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, borrow or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money for the demolition and razing of 
that structure known as "B" Building, located at the 
Westlands School on Dalton Road, and that said "B" 
Building be demolished and razed prior to September 1 , 
1980, and that the site then be used for school purposes; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



March 27, 1980 



I Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 

' warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 

:to wit: Center School Auditorium; North Elementary 
School Auditorium; Parker Junior High School Band 

>Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafe- 
torium; Small Gymnasium, McCarthy Junior High 
School; South Row School Auditorium; Westlands School 
Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford Road, fourteen 



ARTICLE 3 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow a 
certain sum of money for the purpose of school building 
capital improvements and preservation including energy 
conservation components and removal or architectural 
barriers for the handicapped, and authorize the School 
Committee to proceed with the work of said project and 
to enter into all necessary and proper contracts and 
agreements in respect thereto, and to do all other acts 
necessary; 



or act in relation thereto. 



School Committee 



20 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
amount of money to be expended by the Superintendent 
of Insect Pest Control for the timely alleviation of the 
gypsy moth infestation in affected areas of the Town; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map to change 
from Single Residence District (RB) to create a new 
District, Mobile Home Residence District (RMH), the 
land situated on the southerly side of Littleton Road 
(Route 110) beginning at land, now or formerly of Giras; 
thence in a southerly direction by two courses by land of 
Giras and Howard, 630 feet, more or less and 115 feet, 
more or less, to a point; thence, in a southwesterly direc- 
tion by two courses by land, now or formerly, of St. Onge, 
325 feet, more or less, and 945 feet, more or less, to 
Beaver Brook; thence, in a westerly direction by said 
Beaver Brook, 750 feet, more or less, to a point at land of 
the Chelmsford Elks; thence, in a northwesterly direction 
by said land, 845 feet, more or less, to the southerly side 
of said Littleton Road (Route 110); thence in a north- 
easterly direction by the southerly side of said Littleton 
Road, 1750 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. 

Containing 38 acres, more or less, and being, in part, 
Land Court Case No. 9771A; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Law, Section 2300 — Use Regula- 
tion Schedule, Residential Uses, Mobile Home in an 
RMH District (Mobile Home Residential District) by in- 
serting P and adding Footnote 6 to such insertion as 
follows: 

"6. Intensity of use shall be limited to permit a 
maximum of seven (7) units per acre"; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to grant by deed of the Selectmen 
a portion of the premises owned by the Town of Chelms- 
ford as described on Assessors' Map, Plat 7, Block 3, Lot 
3, for consideration to be determined; 



Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and shown on Assessors' 
Map, Plat 7, Block 3, Lot 2A; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 53D, an Act permitting towns to establish 
Recreation and Park Self-Supporting Service Revolv- 
ing Funds; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Recreation Commission 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $500 within the Library Department Budget 
from Line item 123 — Books & Periodicals, to Line item 
121— Repair and Maintenance; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Library Trustees 



ARTICLE 1 1 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $1 , 100 within the Library Department Budget 
from Line item 119 — Custodial & Security, to Line item 
121— Repair & Maintenance; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Library Trustees 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $400 within the Library Department Budget 
from Line item 123 — Books & Periodicals, to Line item 
124 — Other Expenses; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Library Trustees 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $9,000 within the Police Department Budget 
from Line item 139 — Officers and Administration to 
Line item 142 — Maintenance and Equipment; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of purchasing a certain 
parcel of land from the Bay Bank/Middlesex, NA, being 
a portion of the premises located at 40 Vinal Square, 



21 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws, Article VI — Police Regulations — 
Section 20 — Prohibition on Leaving Motor Vehicles in 
Certain Private Ways, by adding the following para- 
graph numbered 6: 

"6. In the absence of the operator of any motor 
vehicle violating any provisions of this By-Law, it 
shall be deemed prima facie evidence that the 
registered owner of such vehicle was the 
operator."; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



April 18, 1980 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Center School Auditorium; North Elementary 
School Auditorium; Parker Junior High School Band 
Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafe- 
torium; Small Gymnasium, McCarthy Junior High 
School; South Row School Auditorium; Westlands School 
Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford Road, fourteen 
days at least before the time appointed for holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the 
Highway Department; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to further 
increase the budget limit established under Chapter 151 
of the Acts of 1979 for the School Department so that the 
School Department Budget for fiscal year 1980 shall be 
increased by a specific amount of money; 



or act in relation thereto. 



School Committee 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to further 
increase the appropriations and budget limit established 
under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 so that the Town's 
appropriations and budget limit for Fiscal Year 1980 
shall be increased by a specific amount of money; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 17th day of April, A.D. 
1980. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



Paul C. Hart, Chairman 

Bonita Towle 

John W. Carson 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Dennis J. Ready 



SELECTMAN 3 years 

Dennis J. Ready 

Barnard L. George 

Paul C. Hart (re-election) 

Write in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

TREASURER AND TAX COLLECTOR 

James R. Doukszewicz 

Anthony V. Bruno Jr. 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



22 

TOWN ELECTION 

April 5, 1980 

Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pcy 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



227 


114 


288 


115 


494 


264 


198 


144 


209 


93 


339 


203 


295 


209 


405 


137 


322 


379 



246 


185 


289 


2695 


206 


185 


181 


2198 


318 


281 


324 


3351 








1 


10 


134 


133 


125 


1364 


904 


784 


920 


9618 


343 


324 


337 


3484 


103 


60 


T.7 


1264 



ASSESSOR for 3 years 

Ruth K. Delaney (re election) 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER for 3 years 

Gerald L. Hardy (re-election) 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

HOUSING AUTHORITY for 5 years 

Ruth K. Delaney (re-election) 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



354, 283 452 



124 
527 



1039 
4809 



996 
4809 



HOUSING AUTHORITY for 2 year 

Claude A. Harvey 

Write-in 



TOTAL 



- fill vacancy 



1138 
4809 



MEMBER OF BOARD OF HEALTH for 3 years 

Paul J. Canniff (re-election) 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

PARK COMMISSIONER for 3 years 

Eileen M. Duffy 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

PLANNING BOARD MEMBER for 3 years 

Carolyn J. Fenn 

Ann H. McCarthy (re-election) 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

MEMBER OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE for 3 year 

Edward H. Hilliard 

Kenneth C. Taylor 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SEWER COMMISSIONER for 3 years 

John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Write-in 



TOTAL 

PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEE for 3 year 

Brenda M. McDermott (re-election) 

Janet B. Hendl 

James P. Monahan 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



1215 
4809 



101 


56 


112 


49 


151 


110 


48 


63 


59 


118 


89 


107 


1063 


418 


285 


527 


211 


644 


496 


287 


354 


283 


452 


392 


460 


4809 


265 


163 


365 


129 


407 


325 


190 


224 


184 


264 


233 


325 


3074 


301 


206 


376 


147 


429 


370 


214 


276 


216 


306 


286 


305 


3432 


270 


201 


313 


146 


452 


297 


170 


208 


166 


334 


265 


290 


3112 


836 


570 


1054 


422 


1288 


992 


574 


708 


566 


904 


784 


920 


9618 


265 


164 


337 


130 


405 


323 


189 


234 


179 


275 


245 


282 


3028 


267 


197 


370 


145 


431 


346 


212 


256 


213 


296 


252 


340 


3325 


4 











1 





1 


2 





4 


2 


2 


16 


300 


209 


347 


147 


451 


323 


172 


216 


174 


329 


285 


296 


3249 


836 


570 


1054 


422 


1288 


922 


574 


708 


566 


904 


784 


920 


9618 


301 


223 


399 


160 


474 


378 


243 


275 


202 


317 


293 


324 


3589 


4 




















.i 











1 


5 


113 


62 


128 


51 


170 


118 


44 


79 


81 


135 


99 


135 


1215 


418 


285 


527 


211 


644 


496 


287 


354 


283 


452 


392 


460 


4809 


298 


197 


406 


142 


453 


368 


207 


271 


201 


323 


263 


333 


3462 


148 


111 


299 


79 


297 


191 


116 


158 


137 


194 


152 


221 


2103 


190 


117 


149 


87 


215 


212 


131 


152 


124 


164 


173 


166 


1880 


200 


145 


200 


114 


323 


221 


120 


127 


104 


223 


196 


200 


2173 


836 


570 


1054 


422 


1288 


992 


574 


708 


566 


904 


784 


920 


9618 



23 



CONSTABLE for 3 years 

William E. Spence (re-election) 

Write-in 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



1043 
4809 



QUESTION 



Blanks 
TOTAL 



1123 
4809 



24 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 28, 1980 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:40 
PM by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlinjr. who recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum. There were 356 voters 
present. Selectman Emerson moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Select- 
man Emerson then moved that the reading of the entire 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Hart moved that 
the reports of Town Officers and Committees be heard. 

Selectman Ready moved to nominate Bernard Battles 
to the Varney Playground Commission for a three year 
term. The Moderator asked for any more nominations 
from the floor, hearing none Selectman Emerson moved 
to close nominations. It was so voted by voice. The Town 
Meeting body then voted on Bernard Battles as commis- 
sioner of the Varney Playground. It was so voted by voice, 
unanimously. 

George Ripsom, Chairman of the Finance Committee 
discussed the Federal Revenue Sharing Budget hearing. 
The sum of $345,000 will be available for use in fiscal 
1980-1981 and proposes that the funds be appropriated 
as follows: Fire Department Salaries $172,500, Police 
Department Salaries $172,500. The transfer and ap- 
propriation of funds will be through approval of the 
respective departmental budgets as they are brought 
before the Town Meeting Body for action. The sum of 
$345,000 represents approximately $1 .20 on the tax rate. 

The Moderator inquired if there were any more reports 
from any other Town Officers or Committees, hearing 
none proceeded onto article two. 

Personnel Board By-Law 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Barbara Ward, Chairman of the 
Personnel Board moved to amend the Personnel Wage 
and Salary Administration By-Law. The Finance Com- 
mittee is not in favor of Part 1 section 14 of this article. 
George Ripsom explained why, and moved to delete this 
section. Patricia Barton of the Personnel Board explain- 
ed why the Board was asking for this amendment. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to delete. 
The voice vote left him in doubt and he asked for a show 
of hands. The motion to delete was defeated. Norman 
LeBreque then moved to delete moving the Administra- 
tive and Clerical: Line 6, Selectmen's Administrative 
Assistant, in Part 5 and under section 2A. He felt that 
this position should be left in. Barbara Ward explained 
why the Board was deleting this position. The moderator 
asked for a voice votf on the motion to delete this posi- 
tion. Motion defeated by voice vote. Louis Hardy moved 
to add the word "over" twenty hours (20) or more a week 
on prorated basis to Part 1 section 14. Personnel Board 
was in favor of this motion. The moderator then asked for 
a voice vote. Motion carried to add the word "over". 

The Moderator then asked for a voice vote on the main 
motion as amended in its entirety. Motion Carried. 



ARTICLE 2 as amended reads as follows: 

1. Under Section 14 subtitled "Vacations" by inserting 
the following as the first sentence: 

"Vacation leave shall be granted to part-time 
regular employees with a work schedule of over 
twenty (20) or more hours a week on a prorated 
basis." 

2. Under Section 8 subtitled "Increases Within Grade 
Levels and Promotions" by adding the following as 
Subsection (a)" 

"(a) Newly hired employees and employees who 
are promoted or placed in a new position shall be 
given a performance evaluation upon comple- 
tion of six (6) months in the new position. These 
employees may be recommended for a merit in- 
crease at this time. Such increases must be 
recommended by the employee's department 
head and approved by the Personnel Board." 

3. Under Section 8 subtitled "Increases Within Grade 
Levels and Promotions" by re-lettering Subsection 
(a) to Subsection (b) and adding the following sen- 
tence: 

"Such increases are to be based on the 
employee's job performance and development 
during the previous year." 

4. Under Section 8 re-letter the Subsection as follows: 

(b) to be (c); (c) to be (d) and (cc) to be (e). 

5. Under Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Stan- 
dard Rates For Wages and Salaries of the Personnel 
Wage and Salary By-Law" by deleting the following 
positions: 

Administrative and Clerical: Line 6, Selectmen's 
Administrative Assistant; Recreation: Line 2, 
Summer Director; Youth Center: Line 1, Youth 
Center Coordinator; Line 12, Administrative 
Assistant to the Assessors; Recreation Line 1, 
Director, Line 2, Youth Center Supervisor; Line 
3, Clerk Youth 

And further amending Section 2 A by adding the 
following positions: 

Library: Line 13, Maintenance Assistant; Recre- 
ation; Line 1 , Director/Youth Center Coor- 
dinator: Line 9, Lifeguard. 



25 



6. Under Section 6 subtitled "Classification of Present 
Town Employees" amend Subsection (g) — Wage 
and Salary Schedule" to read as follows: 

Wage and Salary Schedule 
July 1, 1980 - June 30, 1981 



Grade Level 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 



Salary Range 

$6,800-9,384 
7,820-10,792 
8,840-12,199 
9,860-13,607 
10,880-15,014 
11,900-16,422 
12,920-17,830 
13,940-19,237 
14,960-20,645 
15,980-22,052 
17,000-23,460 
18,020-24,868 
19,040-26,275 
20,060-27,683 
21,080-29,090 
22,100-30,498 
23,120-31,906 
24,140-33,313 
25,160-34,721 
26,180-36,128 



UNDER ARTICLE 2 A Selectmen Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to further amend the Personnel Wage 
and Salary By-Law as follows: 

1. Under Section 3 subtitled "Personnel Board", 
delete the fourth paragraph in its entirety and 
substitute the following in its place: 

"No member of the Personnel Board shall be an 
elected Official of the Town of Chelmsford." 



2. Under Section 3 subtitled "Personnel Board", 
the following paragraph as paragraph 4: 



add 



"All members of the Personnel Board shall be 
registered voters of the Town of Chelmsford. 
Town Employees who are subject to this By-Law, 
voting in Personnel Board elections, shall be 
registered voters of the Town of Chelmsford, and 
an official voting list shall be used at all elections 
to determine the eligibility of each employee to 
vote."; 

The Personnel Board was against this article. Alan 
Murphy of the Personnel Board explained the reason. 
George Ripsom of the Finance Committee moved to 
delete all of Part 1 and all of Part 2 with the exception of 
the first sentence: "All members of the Personnel Board 
shall be registered voters of the Town of Chelmsford." 
The Board of Selectmen were in favor of this motion to 
amend. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, Motion 
Carried. The main motion now reads: 



Under Section 3 subtitled "Personnel Board" 
the following paragraph as paragraph 4: 



add 



"All members of the Personnel Board shall be 
registered voters of the Town of Chelmsford. 

A voice vote was taken on the main motion as amend- 
ed, Motion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2B Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-Law, Section 7, subtitled "Hiring of New Em- 
ployees", by deleting subparagraph 7(a) in its entirety 
and substituting the following in its place: 

"The wage or salary of a new employee may be set 
by an Appointed or Elected Board at any step with- 
in the level established by the Personnel Board."; 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee was not in 
favor of the article. The Selectmen were. Barbara Ward 
of the Personnel Board was also not in favor. Alan Mur- 
phy of the Personnel Board spoke against this article. A 
number of voters spoke for and against this article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion. 

Motion Defeated by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2C Barbara Ward, Chairman of 
the Personnel Board moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law by further amen- 
ding Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Standard Rates 
for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary 
By-Law", to conform to rates of pay negotiated by the 
Town with certain labor organizations, pursuant to 
General Laws, Chapter 150 E. Barbara Ward explained 
this article. The Finance Committee recommends pass- 
age. The Moderator asked for a Voice Vote. Motion Car- 
ried. 



7/79-6/80 7/80-6/81 
Current Proposed Proposed 

Level Level Salary 
Administrative & Clerical 

1 . Veteran's Agent 8 8 

2. Clerk, Senior 4 4 

3. Town Accountant 12 12 

4. Assistant Treasurer 5 5 

5. Town Counsel - 500 p. a. 

6. Executive Secretary 15 15 

7. Board of Registrars' Clerk — S50 p.a. 

8. Bd. of Reg. . three members — — 360 ea. p.a. 

9. Clerk, part-time 2 2 

10. Town Aide 5 7 

1 1 . Assistant Town Clerk 5 5 

Conservation, Parks & Cemetery 

1 . Cemetery Superintendent 9 9 

2. Supt. of Insect & Pest Control — 1 ,250 p.a. 

3. Landscaper — Park 2 2 

4. Laborer— Park 1 1 

5. Unskilled Laborer #4, #2 #4, #2 

6. Skilled Forest Workman — Cons 1 1 

7. Equipment Operator 4 4 

8. Park Superintendent 9 9 

Custodial 

1. Custodian 2 2 

Library 

1 . Library Director 12 12 

2. Library Asst. Director 7 7 

3. Branch Librarian 5 5 

4. Librarian. Dept. Head 2 3 

5. Library Specialist — Bookkeeper 3 3 

6. Library Specialist— Cataloger 3 3 

7 . Library Specialist — Reference Lib 3 3 



26 



8. Library Specialist — Sec/Rec 3 3 

9. Librarian Assistants 1 2 

10. Librarian Clerk 1 1 

11. Aides #2 #2 

12. Supervisor— Maintenance 4 4 

13. Maintenance Assistant 2 2 

Highway Department 

1 . Highway Superintendent 12 12 

2. Highway Foreman 9 9 

Town Fire Department 

1. Fire Chief #2. #5 #2. #5 

2. Deputy Fire Chief #2. #6 #2, #6 

3. Mechanic (Fire & Police) 6 6 

Town Police Department 

1. PoliceChief 20 20 

2. DeputyChief 18 18 

3. Captain 16 16 

Recreation 

1. Director/Youth Center Coord — 9 

2. Clerk, Part-time 2 2 

3. Water Front Director 5.00 pr/hr 5.00 pr/hr 

Min. Max. 

4. Swimming Instructor 76.40 wk 109.20 wk #2 

5. Playground Director 76.40 wk 109.20 wk #2 

6. Playground Supervisor 76.40 wk 109.20 wk #2 

7. Playground Instructor 76.40 wk 109.20 wk #2 

8. Sports Instructor 76.40 wk 109.20 wk #2 

9. Lifeguard 76.40 wk 109.20 wk #2 

10. Recreation Supervisor 4 

1 1 . Program Directors 2 

Youth Center 

1 . Youth Center Supervisor 2 4 

2. Clerk-Youth 2 2 

Miscellaneous 

1. Animal Inspector #2 #2 1,000 p. a. 

2. Building Inspector 10 10 

3. Gas Inspector #2 #2 5,000 p. a. 

4. Electric Inspector 9 9 

5. Sealer of Weights & Measures #2 #2 2,000 p. a. 

6. Dog Officer 2 2 

7. Assistant Dog Officer 1 1 

8. Clock Winder #2 #2 100 p.a. 

9. Local Inspector 7 7 

10. Van Driver 3 3 

Footnotes 

#1 Represented by Collective Bargaining 

#2 Not in "Job Rating Plan" 

#4 Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

#5 Salary Will be 200% of the highest paid union firefighter established by 

State Law 
#6 Salary will be 84% of the Fire Chief 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 James R. Doukszewicz, Town 

Treasurer, moved that the Town vote to raise and ap- 
propriate such sums of money as may be required to 
defray town charges for the fiscal period from July 1, 
1980 to June 30, 1981 . The moderator stated that either a 
2/3's vote would be required or a unanimous Voice vote 
would be needed from the Town Meeting Body for the 
total amount per department. 

Finance Committee Recommendation 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Salaries 

1. Accountant 

2. Senior Clerk (3) 

3. Vacation and Sickness 

Total 



$21,807.00 

30,200.00 

1.00 

52,008.00 



Expenses: 

4. Expenses 

5. Outlay 

Total 
TOTAL ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 

ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 
Inspector's Salary 

6. Expenses 

TOTAL ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPT. 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

7. Clerk, Part Time 

8. Expenses 

TOTAL BOARD OF APPEALS 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

ASSESSOR'S 
Salaries: 

9. Assessor (Full Time) 

10. Board Member (Part Time) 

11. Adm. Assistant 

12. Senior Clerk (2) 1 Clerk Level 1 

13. CM. A. Compensation 

Total 

Expenses: 

14. Office Expenses 

15. Transportation 

16. Outlay's 

17. Data Proc. (Tax Billing) 
17a. Education 

Total 
TOTAL ASSESSOR'S DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

BUILDING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 
Includes: Zoning By-Law Enforcement 

18. Inspector's Salary 

19. Local Inspector 

20. Sr. Clerk 

2 1 . Vacation & Sickness 

22. Transportation Local Inspector 

23. Transportation Bldg. Insp. 

24. Inspector's Expenses 

25 . Out of Town Expenses 

26. Plumbing Insp. (Fees & Transfers) 
TOTAL BUILDING INSPECTOR'S DEPT. 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
Salaries: 

27. Commissioners (3) 

28. Superintendent 

29. General Labor 

30. Special Labor for Lot Owners 

31. Interments 

Total 



27 



1,000.00 

13,917.00 

2,225.00 

300.00 

1,500.00 

18,942.00 
99,611.00 



2,375.00 
1,225.00 
3,600.00 



14,100.00 
14,100.00 



150.00 
150.00 



9,900.00 
9,050.00 
4,000.00 

22,950.00 



32. Transportation 

33. Expenses 

34. Outlays 

35. Out of State 

36. Restore Historical Cemeteries 

Total 
TOTAL CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

37. Expenses 

38. Outlays 
TOTAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

39. Expenses 
TOTAL CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

CONSTABLE 

40. Constable's Salary 
TOTAL CONSTABLE'S DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

41 . Salary (Van Driver) 

42. Expenses 

43. Transportation Expenses 
TOTAL COUNCIL ON AGING 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

DEBT AND INTEREST 
Principal Payments: 

44. High School Loan No. 2 00.00 

45 . South Row Elem . School Loan 45,000.00 

46. Junior High School Loan 105,000.00 

47. Westland Elem. School and 

Harrington Elem . School Loan 1 60 , 000 . 00 

48. Byam Elementary School Loan 105,000.00 

49. High School- 1972 #1 850,000.00 

50. High School- 1972 #2 240,000.00 

Debt Total 1,505,000.00 

Interest: 

5 1 . High School Loan No. 2 00.00 

52. Anticipation of Revenue and 
Reimbursement Loans 60,000.00 

53. South Row Elem. School Loan 1,575.00 

54 . Junior High School 1 3 , 488 . 00 

55. Westland Elem. School and 

Harrington Elem. School Loan 50,740.00 

56. Byam Elementary School Loan 58,350.00 

57. High School- 1972 #1 93,500.00 

58. High School- 1972 #2 11,760.00 

Interest Total 289,413.00 

TOTAL DEBT AND INTEREST 1,794,413.00 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 

DOG OFFICER 

The Moderator attempted a unanimous voice vote on 
this department, and did not receive one, the following 



tellers came forward and a hand count was taken: 



William Drury 
Gordon Reed 
Neil Lerer 



Dorothy Lerer 
Carl Olsson 
Vicki Cooper 
Carol Stark 



Margaret Johnson 
Sandra Kilburn 
Richard Burtt 



the result of the hand count was: Yes 184 No 68 the Dog 
Officer's budget passes. 



Salaries: 

59. Dog Officer 

60. Assistant Dog Officer 

61. Expenses 

62. Care of Deceased Animals 
TOTAL DOG OFFICER 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

63. Expenses 

TOTAL EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

ELECTIONS 

64. Wages and Expenses 
TOTAL ELECTIONS 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

65. Expenses 

TOTAL FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 



9,546.00 
7,575.00 
1,800.00 
2,500.00 
21,421.00 



1,200.00 
1,200.00 



22,458.00 
22,458.00 



1,500.00 
1,500.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Norman LeBrecque moved to amend line #68 
(severance Pay) from 13,111. to 0.. Chief Reid explained 
that this is a negotiated item by union contract. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the Motion to 
amend, the motion was defeated by voice vote. 

Salaries: 

66. Officers and Administration 168,640.00 

67. Regular and Substitute Account 1,336,284.00 

68. Severence Pay 13,111.00 

Total 1,518,035.00 

Expenses: 

69. Maintenance and Equipment 79,271 .00 

70. Outlays 5,867.00 

71. Out of State 400.00 

72. Stabilization Fund (Equipment) 19,000.00 

Total 104,538.00 

Total Fire Department 1,622,573.00 

Appropriations from Federal Revenue 
Sharing, for Salaries 172,500.00 

COST TO TOWN 1,450,073.00 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 

GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPARTMENT 

73. Inspectors Salary 5,000.00 

74. Expenses 624.00 

75. Transportation 524.00 

76 . Out of Town Expenses 25 . 00 



28 



77. Vacation and Sickness 1.00 

TOTAL GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPT. 6,174.00 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

HEALTH & SANITATION DEPARTMENT 

78 . Board Members 828 . 00 

79. Director of Public Health 22,000.00 

80. Inspector 14,000.00 

81. Senior Clerk 10,212.00 

82. Physicians 1,000.00 

83. Vacation and Sickness 1.00 



Total 


48,041.00 


ijcpenses: 




84. Health and Professional Services 


4,000.00 


85. Mosquito Control Study 


1.00 


86. Transportation Director 


2,500.00 


87. Other Expenses 


2,270.00 


88. Out of State Expenses 


300.00 


89. Outlay 


1.00 


90. Blood Program 


150.00 


91. Inspector's Transportation 


2,200.00 


Total 


11,422.00 



TOTAL SALARIES & EXPENSES 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 
Salaries: 

92. Administration 

93. Engineer's Fees 

94. Labor — Men 

Total 

Expenses: 

95. Utilities— Materials — Misc. 

96. Waste Collection 

97. Stabilization Fund 

98. Machine Hire — Other 

99. Snow & Ice 
100. Sidewalks 

Total 
TOTAL HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



59,463.00 



89,221.00 

10,000.00 

467,703.00 

566,924.00 



197,368.00 

418,000.00 

10,000.00 

26,960.00 

200,000.00 

7,280.00 

859,608.00 

1,426,532.00 



A question was asked from the Town Meeting floor con- 
cerning line item 96 (Waste Collection). This figure is the 
contract Figure given by the private concern which as of 
July 1st will be responsible for the waste collection detail. 
Town Counsel James Harrington, explained that because 
of the State ordering the closing of the Swain Road Dump 
the town had to go out on bids for a private concern to 
pick up and dispose of the waste. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote on this budget. Due to not receiving an 
unanimous vote the tellers came forward and a hand 
count was taken. The result was Yes 188 No 67 the 
budget passes. 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
101. Expenses 

TOTAL HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 



HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

102. Expenses 

TOTAL HOME RULE ADVISORY COMM. 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

HYDRANT SERVICE 

103. Center 

104. North 

105. East 

106. South 

TOTAL HYDRANT SERVICE 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 

107. Superintendent's Salary 

108. Expenses 

TOTAL INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

109. Prop. Liab. & All Types of Insurance 

110. Chapter 32B Insurance Employee 
TOTAL INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

LAW DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

111. Town Counsel 

112. Legal Services 

113. Misc. Exp. Association Dues 
TOTAL LAW DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 



600.00 



600.00 



44,250.00 

17,976.00 

7,000.00 

5,500.00 

74,726.00 



1,250.00 
12,850.00 
14,100.00 



236,000.00 
392,000.00 

628,000.00 



500.00 

25,000.00 

1,000.00 

26,500.00 



James Cooper, Library Trustee moved to amend line 
item #117 from $141,930 to 152,053. The Finance Com- 
mittee is against this motion to amend. The Moderator 
asks for a voice vote on the motion to amend. It was 
defeated by voice vote. George Ripsom, Chairman of the 
Finance Committee, moved to amend the same line item 
from $141,930 to 144,303. this is because of the Town 
Meeting Body passing article 2 . The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on this motion to amend. The motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Moderator then asked for a 
Voice Vote on the main motion as amended, which is the 
entire Library Budget. Motion Carried, unanimously. 



1,550.00 
1,550.00 



Salaries: 

114. Director 

115. Assistant Director 

116. Branch Librarian 

117. Assistant Librarians 

118. Library Aides 

119. Custodian & Security 

120. Vacation & Sickness 

Total 

Expenses: 

121. Repair & Maint. of Buildings 

122. Fuel, Light and Water 



19,651.00 

14,030.00 

12,809.00 

144,303.00 

6,735.00 
25,184.00 

2,712.00 

225,424.00 



4,082.00 
23,668.00 



29 



123. Books and Periodicals 

124. Other Expenses 

125. Outlays 

Total Library Department 

State Funds Received 

NET LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

MODERATOR 

126. Moderator's Salary 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 



59,741.00 

11,816.00 

2,695.00 

327,426.00 



315,520.00 



300.00 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Assessment 34.23% 613,989.00 

Selectman Hart, moved to table this budget. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion. Motion 
defeated by voice vote. The Moderator than asked for a 
voice vote on the main motion which is Chelmsford's 
Assessment. Motion Carried, unanimously. 



PARK DEPARTMENT 




127. Superintendent's Salary 


18,650.00 


128. Labor 


4,475.00 


129. Expenses 


3,000.00 


130. Outlays 


1.00 


131 . Recreation Field Maint. Labor 


4,450.00 


132. Recreation Field Maint. Expense 


3,000.00 


TOTAL PARK DEPARTMENT 


33,576.00 


Motion Carried, Unanimously 





PERSONNEL BOARD 

133. Expenses 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 

PLANNING BOARD 

134. Planning Board Engineer 

135. Clerk Hire 

136. Expenses 

137. Outlay 

138. Consultant 

TOTAL PLANNING BOARD 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 



650.00 



7,000.00 


2,100.00 


1,000.00 


1.00 


3,000.00 


13,101.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 




Salaries: 




139. Officers and Administration 


334,319.00 


140. Regular and Special Account 


981,678.00 


141. School Traffic Supervisors 


00.00 


Total 


1,315,997.00 


Expenses: 




142. Maintenance and Equipment 


156,163.00 


143. Chiefs Out of State Expenses 


1,050.00 


144. Outlays 


23,854.00 


145. Special & Education, Out of State 


7,300.00 


146. Regional Tactical Unit, Exp. 


1.00 


147. Entrant & Promotional Consultants 


3,000.00 


Total 


191,368.00 


Auxiliary Police: 




148. Expenses 


3,320.00 


149. Outlays 


1,951.00 


Total Auxiliary Police 


5,271.00 



172,500.00 
1,340,136.00 



Total Police Department 1 ,512,636.00 

150. Appropriation from Federal Revenue 
sharing for salaries 

TOTAL COST TO TOWN 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 
Salaries: 

151. Janitor's Salary 17,112.00 

152. Vacations and Sickness 1 .00 



Total 


17,113.00 


Expenses: 




153. Fuel, Light and Water 


35,600.00 


154. Repairs, Equipment and Exp. 


2,000.00 


155. Outlays 


1,500.00 


156. Public Bldg. Supervision 


3,000.00 


Total 


42,100.00 


TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS 


59,213.00 


Motion Carried, Unanimously 




RECREATION COMMISSION 




157. Salaries 


71,287.00 


158. Expenses, Youth 


87,629.00 


159. Outlay 


5,310.00 


Total Recreation Department 


162,609.00 


Youth Center 




160. Salaries 


(27,266.00) 


161. Expenses 


(6,036.00) 


162. Outlay 


( -00) 


Total Youth Center 


.00 


Recreation Community Center (East School) 




163. Expenses 


11,336.00 


164. Salaries, Custodians 


3,477.00 


165. Recreational Supervisor 


.00 


Total Community Center 


14,813.00 


TOTAL RECREATIONAL 


179,039.00 


Motion Carried, Unanimously 




REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT 




Salaries: 




166. Registrars (3) 


1,080.00 


167. Clerk 


10,067.00 


168. Clerk for Board 


884.00 


Total 


12,031.00 


Expenses: 




169. Printing: Men and Women Director 


1,540.00 


170. Printing: Voter's Lists 


250.00 


171. Other Expenses 


800.00 


172. Data Processing 


3,600.00 


173. Census 


4,100.00 


Total 


10,290.00 



TOTAL REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 



22,321.00 



John Peters, Chairman of the School Committee, moved 
to table the School Budget till after the Special Town 
Meeting Schedule for May 5, 1980. The Moderator asked 
for a voice vote to table this budget till after the Special of 
May 5, 1980. Motion carried, unanimously. 



30 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

210. Salary 

211. Expenses 

Total 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 
Salaries: 

212. Chairman 

213. Board Members 

214. Executive Secretary 

215. Selectmen Administrative Asst. 

216. Labor Relations Advisor 
217. Clerk (Part-Time) 

218. Senior Clerk (2) 

219. Purchasing Agent 

220. Clerk— Overtime 



700.00 



TOTAL SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

SEWER COMMISSION 

228. Professional Fee 

229. Expenses 

TOTAL SEWER COMMISSION DEPT. 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

STREET LIGHTING 

230. Street Lighting 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

TOWN AIDE 

231. Salary 

232. Expenses 
TOTAL TOWN AIDE 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

233. Expenses 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 



2,000.00 

300.00 

2,300 



1,500.00 

4,000.00 

27,208.00 

.00 

2,000.00 

1.00 

20,719.00 

1.00 

3,000.00 



4,701.00 
58,751.00 



Total 


53,429.00 


Expenses: 

221. Expenses 

222. Conference Expenses 


10,000.00 
1,300.00 


223. Outlays 

224. Out of State 


1,400.00 
1.00 


225. Purchasing Agent 

226. Photo Copy Machine 


1.00 
8,000.00 


227. Transportation 


400.00 


Total 


21,102.00 



79,531.00 



15,000.00 

3,500.00 

18,500.00 



85,000.00 



14,403.00 

830.00 

15,233.00 



5,200.00 



TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 




234. Town Clerk 


18,887.00 


235. Assistant Town Clerk 


12,628.00 


236. Senior Clerk (2) 


20,134.00 


237. Clerk (Part-Time) 


.00 


238. Clerk (Overtime) 


1,400.00 


239. Vacation and Sickness 


1.00 


240. CM. C. Compensation 


1,000.00 


Total 


54,050.00 


Expenses: 




241. Experises 


4,000.00 


242. Printing By-Law Books 


1.00 



1.00 



23,048.00 
12,628.00 
40,266.00 
11,000.00 
1.00 
86,943.00 

11,000.00 

Stationery 2,300.00 

964.00 

4,200.00 

740.00 

18,400.00 

37,604.00 



243. Outlays 

Total 
TOTAL TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

244. Expenses 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

TREASURER & COLLECTOR 
Salaries: 

245. Treasurer and Collector 

246. Assistant Treasurer 

247. Senior Clerk (4) 

248. Clerks -Part-Time (2) 

249. Vacation & Sickness 

Total 
Expenses: 

250. Postage 

251. Printing Advertising, Binding < 

252. Bonds 

253. Expenses 

254. Outlays 

255. Data Processing Payroll 

Total 

TOTAL TREAS. & COLL. DEPT. 124,547.00 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 

TREE WARDEN'S DEPARTMENT 
Salaries: 

256. Tree Warden 1 ,000.00 

257. Fees 1.00 

Total 1,001.00 
Expenses: 

258. Other Expenses 16,500.00 

259. Outlay L00 

Total 16,501.00 

TOTAL TREE WARDEN DEPARTMENT 17,502.00 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS 

260. Town & Finance Committee Reports 8,000.00 

261. CATV Committee 1 , 000 . 00 

262 . Expenses for Memorial Day 2 , 000 . 00 

263. Expenses for Town Clock 525.00 

264. Ambulance Service 1 .00 

265. Lowell Mental Health Assoc. 8,695.00 

266. Veteran Pension Claims 5,520.00 

267. D. P. W. Committee 1.00 

268. Historic District Committee 806.00 

269. Bus Transportation Subsidy 1.00 

270. Share Inc. (Drug Rehab.) 23,737.00 

271. NMAC Assessment Benefits 8,595.00 

272. Unemployment Benefits Due State 100,000.00 

273. Preliminary Project Study .00 

274. Cultural Council 300.00 

275. Sign Advisory Committee 600.00 

276. Energy Committee 500.00 
276a. Town Festival Committee 500.00 
276b. Industrial Development Commission 100.00 
TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED DEPT. 160,991.00 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 



31 



VARNEY PLAYGROUND 

277. Labor 3,500.00 

278. Expenses 3,000.00 

279. Outlays 1,200.00 



TOTAL VARNEY PLAYGROUND 


7,700.00 


Motion Carried, Unanimously 




VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 




280. Salary of Veteran's Agent 


15,901.00 


281. Clerical 


10,067.00 


282. Expenses 


3,300.00 


283. Outlay 


1.00 


284. Cash and Material Grants 


80,000.00 



TOTAL VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPT. 109,269.00 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Norman LeBrecque moved to amend Line #287. (Clerk, 
Jr.) from $8,022. to $0.00. He felt the Building Dept. has 
been expanding quite a lot over the years and felt that the 
additional help was not necessary. Ronald Wetmore, 
Building Inspector, explained that presently in the 
department there was one Senior Clerk who was in charge 
of three departments. The Gas Inspector, Building In- 
spector and Wiring Inspector. This additional help is for 
actually all the Departments not just the Wiring Inspec- 
tor's. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on Norman 
Lebrecque's motion to amend. Motion defeated by voice 
vote. The Main motion (Wiring Inspector's Department:) 

285 . Inspector's Salary 1 8 , 1 2 . 00 

286. Vacation and Sickness 1 .00 

287. Clerk, Jr 8,022.00 

288. Expenses 1,040.00 

289 . Transportation 2 , 700 . 00 

290 . Out of Town Expenses 275.00 
TOTAL WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPT. 30,050.00 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 

Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved to adjourn the Town 
Meeting until Thursday Evening May 1, 1980 at the Mc- 
Carthy Jr. High at 7:30 PM 

Motion Carried, unanimously to adjourn. The meeting 
adjourned at 10:40 PM. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. Mary E. St.Hilaire, 

Moderator Town Clerk 



32 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 1, 1980 

The Moderator, Daniel J. Coughlinjr. called the meet- 
ing to order at 7:45 PM, he recognized the presence of a 
quorum. There were 207 voters present. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Town Treasurer James R. Douk- 
szewicz, moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Seletcmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of 
the financial year beginning July 1, 1980; in accordance 
with the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 44, Sec- 
tion 4, and to issue a note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Town Treasurer James R. Douk- 
szewicz, moved that the Town vote to request the Depart- 
ment of Revenue, Division of Accounts of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts to make an audit of all ac- 
counts in all departments of the Town of Chelmsford. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$790.94 to meet bills for previous years. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$555,443.01 to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County 
Retirement System, the said amount being the Town's 
share of the pension, expense and military service funds. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 George Ripsom of the Finance 
Committee moved that the Town vote to raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $200,000 to be used as a Reserve 
Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee, as pro- 
vided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to rescind the balance of $7,683.00 
from an authorized original transfer of $63,000.00 from 
the Stabilization Fund as voted under Article 37 (High- 
way Department Equipment Purchase) at the Adjourned 
Annual Town Meeting held on May 16, 1977. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Everett Olsen, Chairman of the 
Cemetery Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
transfer the sum of $7,000.00 from the Sale of Graves and 
Lots to Cemetery Improvement Development Fund. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,000.00 to pay reasonable hospital, medical and 
surgical, chiropractic, nursing, pharmaceutical, pro- 
sthetic and related expenses, and reasonable charges for 
podiatry, pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 41, Sec- 
tion 100B, for certain retired Police Officers and Fire- 
fighters as classified under Chapter 41, Section 100B of 
the Massachusetts General Laws, accepted by vote of the 
1979 Annual Town Meeting. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,750.00 to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the pur- 
pose of providing mutual aid programs for the Police 
Department. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1 ,800.00 to be used to join or buy into the Elder Services 
of the Merrimack Valley, Inc., for the purpose of obtain- 
ing services for the care of the Town's Older Americans. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$99,958.00 for Chapter 90 Construction under Chapter 
356, Section 2b, act of 1977. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$19,000.00 for the purpose of installing a new 10,000 
gallon fiberglass gas tank, a new gas pump and up-grade 
the existing storage fill and venting system at the Police 
Station to comply with current E.P.A. regulations. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to transfer from the Stabilization 
Fund the sum of $107,071.00 for the purchase of a new 
1,000 gallon pumping engine for the Fire Department, 
said purchase to be made under the supervision of the 
Board of Selectmen. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$102,300.00 for the purchase of equipment for the High- 
way Department, such purchase to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to dispose of equipment presently 
being used t»y the Highway Department as follows: 

(a) To purchase one (1) Pickup Truck for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale one (1) Pickup Truck presently being used 
by the Highway Department. 



(b) To purchase one (1) three cubic yard front end 
loader for the Highway Department, and to sell by 
good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) Front End 
Loader presently being used by the Highway 
Department. 

(c) To purchase one (1) Dump Truck for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale one (1) Dump truck presently being used by 
the Highway Department. 

(d) To sell by good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) 
truck and sander body presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

(e) To purchase one (1) Sander Body for the Highway 
Department. 

(f) To purchase one (1) Air Compressor for the 
Highway Department (Stationary type for Garage). 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 



Edward Hilliard asked questions relating to the article. 
Chief McKeon explained the need for the new cars. A 
lengthy discussion followed. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote on the article, which left the Chair in doubt. 
The following tellers were asked to come forward and a 
hand count was taken. 

George BaxendaleMargaret Johnson Gordon Reed 
Dorothy Lerer Richard Sullivan Carl Olsson 
Neil Lerer Sandra Kilburn William Drury 

The result of the hand count: Yes 132 No 20 Motion 
carried. 

Selectman Paul C. Hart moved for reconsideration of 
Article 18. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion for reconsideration. Motion carried, unanimous- 

iy- 

Selectman Hart moved to amend this article to include 
two more line items: (d) 4 Truck Chassis; (e) 6 Packer 
Bodies. 



Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale the following 
equipment presently being used by the Highway Depart- 



(a) 1970 Michigan Front End Loader 

(b) 1973 Dump Truck 

(c) 1974 Truck and Sander Body 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$2,000.00 for the purpose of renovating certain portions 
of the Highway Garage to provide Highway Department 
Administrative Offices. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$2,655.00 to purchase one (1) Industrial Type Tag-a- 
long Equipment Trailer for the Park Department, said 
purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board 
of Selectmen. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$50,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing seven (7) new 
1981 four door sedans and one (1) new 1981 four door 
station wagon to be used by the Police Department, said 
purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board 
of Selectmen, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
transfer by good and sufficient bill of sale, title to six (6) 
1980, one (1) 1979 and one (1) 1976 cruisers now being 
used by the Police Department. 



Selectman Hart explained that due to a private con- 
cern being responsible for the waste collection of the 
Town as of July 1st, this equipment would no longer be of 
any use for the Highway Department. Norman Lebrec- 
que questioned selling four (4) truck chassis and moved 
the amendment to read two (2) truck chassis. He felt that 
the chassis could be of use to the Highway Department, 
and felt it would be foolish to part with all of the chassis. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote. The Moderator 
then asked for a voice vote on Selectman Hart's motion 
which will be four (4) chassis and six (6) Packer Bodies. 
Motion carried, by voice vote. The Moderator then asked 
for a voice vote on the main motion as amended which 
now reads: 

Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell by good and suf- 
ficient bill of sale the following equipment presently be- 
ing used by the Highway Department. 

(a) 1970 Michigan Front End Loader 

(b) 1973 Dump Truck 

(c) 1974 Truck and Sander Body 

(d) 4 Truck Chassis 

(e) 6 Packer Bodies 

Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$100,000.00 for the purpose of resurfacing portions of 
certain streets throughout the Town with Type I Bitu- 
minous Concrete. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$50,000.00 to alleviate certain drainage problems 



34 



througout the Town, under the supervision of the Board 
of Selectmen. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 24 The Finance Committee moved 
to table this article due to an article which will be 
brought up at the Special Town Meeting of May 5, 1980. 
After the Special Town Meeting is concluded, this article 
will be brought up again. Motion Carried by voice vote to 
table the article until May 5, 1980. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$11,500.00 for the repair or rehabilitation of the Town 
Parking lot at Vinal Square. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26 The Finance Committee moved 
to dismiss this article. 

Motion Carried by voice vote to dismiss. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27 Arthur Reade of the Mosquito 
and Gypsy Moth Commission spoke in favor of this arti- 
cle. Eli Safdie of the same Committee moved to table this 
article until after the conclusion of the May 5, 1980 
Special Town Meeting and after Article 24. Due to an ar- 
ticle which will appear at the Special Town Meeting. Mo- 
tion carried by voice vote to table the article until May 5 , 
1980. 

UNDER ARTICLE 28 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$15,000.00 for the purpose of eradicating mosquitoes by 
means of aerial spraying or other appropriate means, 
under the supervision of the Board of Health. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of this article. Mr. 
Safdie of the Mosquitoe and Gypsy Moth Committee gave 
a presentation concerning this article. A discussion 
followed. Gordon Reed moved the question to stop 
debate. Motion carried, unanimously by voice vote on 
stopping debate. 

A voice vote was taken on the main motion, which left 
the chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and a hand 
count was taken: Yes 137 No 35 Motion is carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 29 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$3,000.00 for the purchase and installation of a guard 
rail at a hazardous curve on Main Street at Wilson Lane. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30 Seletman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$18,000.00 to be expanded by the Committee to Update 
Town History under the supervision of the Board of 



Selectmen, for the publication of an updated History of 
the Town. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31 Janet Lombard, Chairman of 
the Board of Assessors moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $250,000.00 to contract with 
a firm for the purpose of equalization of real estate values 
in preparation for implementation of Chapter 797 of the 
Acts of 1979, the Classification Amendment. 

Janet Lombard explained the purpose of this article, 
and answered questions from the floor. It was explained 
that if the Town did not vote to accept this article then 
the State would assign a firm to do the revaluation of the 
Town. If the Town does choose to vote in favor of this ar- 
ticle then the Board of Assessors themselves would be able 
to choose the firm or the way in which to revaluate 
the town themselves. This article would meet the deadline 
requirement set by the State of July 1st, 1980. The fact 
was mentioned that if the State was to handle the revalua- 
tion program, then the cost would be deducted from the 
cherry sheet at the end of the year. Michael Rukin moved 
the question to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote to stop debate. Motion carried, unanimously. 
The Moderator than asked for a voice vote on the main 
motion, which left the chair in doubt. The tellers came 
forward and a hand count was taken: Yes 52 No 124 the 
motion was defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
to dismiss this article. 

Motion Carried by voice vote to dismiss. 

UNDER ARTICLE 33 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
to dismiss this article. 

Motion Carried by voice vote to dismiss. 

UNDER ARTICLE 34 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Arti- 
cle 1— "General Provisions" — Section 3 — "Town Meeting 
Rules of Order" — Subsection 2 — "Quorum Require- 
ments" by deleting paragraph 2.2 and substituting the 
following in its place: 

"A quorum of at least 300 registered voters eligi- 
ble to vote must be present to legally open any 
and all Special Town Meetings for the trans- 
action of Town Business. Upon the opening of 
the Special Town Meeting by the prescribed 
quorum, there shall be no further requirement 
as to a quorum, and any number of registered 
voters eligible to vote may transact and consum- 
mate the business of the Town under the Special 
Town Meeting Warrant." 

The Finance Committee is not in favor of this article. 
The Board of Selectmen were in favor. A number of 
voters expressed that they were not in favor of passage of 
this article. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on this 
article. The motion was defeated by voice vote. 



35 



Jack Luskin moved for the reconsideration of Article 
31. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion 
for reconsideration of Article 31. Motion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31 (see May 12, Meeting) Michael 
Rukin moved to amend the article to read: Raise and ap- 
propriate the sum of $10,000.00 for the purpose of 
equalization of real estate values to enter into any con- 
tract for services related thereo in preparation for im- 
plementation of Chapter 797 of the Acts of 1979, the 
Classification Amendment. 

The Finance Committee Chairman, George Ripsom 
expressed the Finance Committee's recommendation for 
the main motion. Edward Hilliard was in favor of the 
main motion. A lengthy discussion followed. Eli Safdie 
moved to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a voice 
voter on the motion to stop debate. Motion Carried, by 
voice vote. The Moderator then asked for a voice vote on 
Michael Rukin's motion to amend the article from 
$250,-000.00 to $10,000.00. Motion defeated by voice 
vote. More discussion followed. Dolores McGuire moved 
to table this article until the conclusion of the May 5, 
1980, Special Town Meeting, after Article 27. She felt 
that at that time the Assessors would be able to answer 
questions on just how they would handle the revluation 
program, and what they felt would be the best way to go 
about it. The public at that time would know that the ar- 
ticle would be up for consideration. Once the decision is 
made whether the State or the Town will handle the 
revaluation program, it will be the final time that the 
voters can decide. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the motion to table this article until after the Special 
Town Meeting of May 5, 1980, and after Article 27. Mo- 
tion Carried to table this article, by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 35 George Ripsom of the Finance 
Committee, moved that the Town vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article II — "Town Meeting" — Section 
3 — "Town Meeting Rules of Order" — Subsection 3 — 
"Order of Precedence of Motions" as follows: 

Delete within line (h), under column "Can be 
Reconsidered" the word "No" and substitute in 
its place the word "Yes." 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

Selectman Paul C. Hart moved to adjourn the Town 
Meeting until Monday evening May 5, 1980 at the Mc- 
Carthy Jr. High at 7:30 PM. 

Motion Carried, unanimously to adjourn. The Meeting 
adjourned at 10:50 PM. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. Mary E. St.Hilaire, 

Moderator Town Clerk 



36 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 5, 1980 

The Moderator, Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. called the meet- 
ing to order at 7:30 PM, he recognized the presence of a 
quorum. There were 909 voters present. 

UNDER ARTICLE 36 John W. Peters, Chairman of 
the School Committee, moved that the Town vote to 
direct the School Committee to establish the School 
Transportation policy for the Town. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 



"3311. Permits. No sign shall be erected, enlarg- 
ed or structurally altered without a sign permit 
issued by the Building Inspector, with the excep- 
tion of unlighted signs one square foot or smaller 
and temporary construction signs less than 
twelve (12) square feet in area. Temporary 
unlighted real estate signs require no sign permit 
if erecting agent has obtained a one-year permit 
from the Building Inspector for erecting such 
signs." 

Amend Article III — "General Regulations" under 
Subsection 3320 — "Signs Permitted in Residential 
Districts", subparagraph 3323 by adding the 
following: 



Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 37 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Arti- 
cle VII — "Miscellaneous" by adding the following sec- 



"Section 8 — Licensing of Dogs Any person who 
fails to pay the required licensing fees as set forth 
in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 140 on 
or before June 10 of any year shall, prior to the 
issuance of any license, pay a penalty fee of $5.00 
in addition to all other licensing fees dues. This 
penalty shall not apply to any person who, dur- 
ing any licensing period, becomes the owner or 
keeper of a dog three months old or over or to 
the owner or keeper of a dog that becomes three 
months old during the licensing period, provided 
the licensing fee is paid with thirty (30) days of 
such event." 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of the 
article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 38 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law as 
follows: 

1. Amend Article III — "General Regulations" — Sec- 
tion 3300 by adding the following subparagraph 
under Subsection 3320 — "Signs Permitted in Resi- 
dential Districts": 

"3325. One temporary unlighted sign not larger 
than twenty-five (25) square feet in an area in- 
dicating the name and address of the parties in- 
volved in construction on the premises. Requires 
no permit if not more than twelve (12) square 
feet in area and is removed within thirty (30) 
days of erection." 

2. Amend Article III — "General Regulations" — Sub- 
section 3310 by deleting the entire first sentence of 
subparagraph 3311 and substituting the following 
in its place: 



"These signs require no sign permit if erecting 
agent has obtained a one-year permit from the 
Building Inspector for erecting such signs." 

4. Amend Article III — "General Regulations" — under 
Subsection 3330 — "Signs Permitted in Business Dis- 
tricts", subparagraph 3336 by adding the follow- 
ing: 

"These signs require no sign permit if erecting 
agent has obtained a one-year permit from the 
Building Inspector for erecting such signs." 

5. Amend Article III — "General Regulations" — Sub- 
section 3330 — "Signs Permitted in a Business Dis- 
trict"— subparagraph 3335 by adding the follow- 
ing: 

"These signs require no sign permit if not more 
than twelve (12) square feet in area and are 
removed within thirty (30) days of erection." 

6. Amend Article III — "General Regulations" — Sub- 
section 3370 — "Sign Advisory Committee" — sub- 
paragraph 3371 by deleting the words "...one 
registered Architect or Landscape Architect..." 
from the second sentence of said Subsection and 
substituting in its place ". . .one person trained in ar- 
chitecture or landscape architecture..." 

7. Amend Article III — "General Regulations" — Sub- 
section 3370 — "Sign Advisory Committee" — sub- 
paragraph 3372 by deleting the words "...within 
ten days from the date of referral..." from the sec- 
ond sentence of said Subsection and substituting in 
its place " . . .within twenty-one days from the date of 
referral..." 

8. Amend Article V — "Definitions" by deleting para- 
graph "c" under the definition of sign and substitu- 
ting in its place the following: 

"c. Temporary devices erected for a charitable 
or religious cause provided they are removed 
within seven (7) days of erection." 

9. Amend Article III — "General Regulations" by ad- 
ding the following subparagraph under Subsection 
3310 — "General Regulations" 



37 



"3315. Identification. All signs approved by the 
Building Inspector will have an identifying num- 
ber affixed to the face of the sign in the lower 
right hand corner, said numbers to be at least 
one inch in height." 

The Planning Board Chairman, Henrick Johnson gave 
the Planning Board's recommendation on this article: 
"Based on its review of this amendment and its public 
hearing held April 23, 1980, the Planning Board recom- 
mends adoption of Article 38. 

The Finance Committee is also in favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 39 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law Article 
I, Section 1200 — "Administration", Subsection 1220 — 
"Compliance Certification" by adding the following sen- 
tence: 

"Any person failing to obtain a Building Permit 
from the Inspector of Buildings where required 
by these By-Laws or the State Building Code 
shall be punishable by a fine of $100.00 for each 
offense." 

Chairman of the Planning Board, Henrick Johnson, 
gave the Planning Board's recommendation on this arti- 
cle: Based on its review of this amendment and its public 
hearing held on April 23, 1980, the Planning Board 
recommends adoption of Article 39. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of this 
article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 40 Selectmen Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law Article 
IV— "Special Regulations" — Section 4100 — "Accessory 
Uses and Structures" by adding the following Subsection: 
4180 

"Any Willow tree found growing within 50 feet 
of any portion of a Town maintained drainage 
system, or within 50 feet of any drainage ease- 
ment, whether granted to the Town by specific 
deed or included on a definitive plan submitted 
pursuant to the provisions of the Subdivision 
Control Law, is hereby declared to be a 
nuisance, and it shall be unlawful to permit any 
such Willow Tree to grow or remain in any such 
location. It shall be the duty of the Inspector of 
Buildings to serve, or cause to be served, notice 
upon the owner of any premises on which willow 
trees are permitted to grow in violation of the 
provisions of this ordinance and demand abate- 
ment of this nuisance within thirty (30) days." 

Chairman of the Planning Board, Henrick Johnson, 
gave the Planning Board recommendation on this article: 
Based on its review of the amendment and its public 



hearing held April 23, 1980, the Planning Board recom- 
mends adoption of Article 40. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 41 Chairman of the Planning 
Board, Henrick Johnson, moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law as follows: 

1 . Section 2300 — "Use Regulations Schedule" — delete 
the reference to footnote 4 at each entry where it 
appears opposite the following uses: Business, Pro- 
fessional Offices, Medical Center, Clinic and 
Funeral Home. 

2. Delete the first sentence of Section 4510 — "Applica- 
bility" and substitute the following: 

"Any premises having more than 10,000 square 
feet gross floor area devoted to retail stores or 
services (including motor vehicle), restaurant, 
fast food establishment, bank, finance agency, 
or indoor or outdoor commercial recreation shall 
be considered a Major Business Complex." 

Mr. Johnson then gave the Planning Board's recom- 
mendation on the article: Based on its review of this 
amendment and its public hearing held February 13, 
1980, the Planning Board recommends adoption of Arti- 
cle 41. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of the 
article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 42 Chairman of the Planning 
Board, Henrick Johnson moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by deleting the 
present Zoning Map and substituting the redrafted Map 
proposed by the Planning Board, as filed with the Town 
Clerk, and displayed at the Town Meeting. 

Mr. Johnson then gave the Planning Board's recom- 
mendation on the article: Based on its review of the pro- 
posed map and its public hearing held on March 12, 
1980, the Planning Board recommends adoption of this 
redrafted zoning and street map. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 43 Chairman of the Planning 
Board, Henrick Johnson gave the Planning Board's 
recommendation on the article: Based on its review of 
this amendment and its public hearing held on April 9, 
1980, the majority of the Planning Board voted to recom- 
mend adoption of Article 43. 

Eugene F. Crane, moved to amend this article by ad- 
ding the following sub-paragraph 3(a) immediately 
following paragraph 3 thereof: 



38 



"3(a) That land owned by Arthur O. Wellman, 
etals, d/b/a Wellman Realty Company and 
situated northerly of the Boston and Maine R.R. 
Tracks and southerly, southeasterly and south- 
westerly of the Merrimack River, as shown on 
said Chelmsford Flood Plain and Floodway Dis- 
trict Map is excluded from the operation of this 
article. 

Robert Sullivan, representing Eugene Crane, explain- 
ed the purpose of this amendment. Paul Bienvenu of the 
Flood Plain Study Committee, spoke against this amend- 
ment to the article. The Finance Committee asked for a 
ruling from Town Counsel on the article. James Harr- 
ington, Town Counsel stated that HUD required that the 
Town by June 4th, 1980, must adopt a Flood Plain Map, 
if the Town doesn't then all flood plain insurance will not 
be renewed when a policy comes up for renewal. No fur- 
ther flood plain insurance will be issued to the Town. The 
Town will be considered non-compliant. The Moderator 
asked for a Voice vote on the motion to amend. Motion 
Defeated by voice vote. Norman LeBrecque then moved 
to include the words "of more than 1 foot" after the word 
increase and before the word in, in Section 4 #1 (All en- 
croachments etc. sentence). Henrick Johnson, Planning 
Board Chairman, spoke against the motion to amend. 
Paul Bienvenu also spoke against the motion to amend. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on Mr. LeBrecque's 
motion to amend. Motion was defeated by voice vote. 
The Moderator then asked for a voice vote on the main 
motion. Motion carried, unanimously, and reads as 
follows: 

Henrick Johnson moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law, Section 2700 — "Flood 
Plain District", as follows: 



1. Delete Section 2720- 
entirety. 

2. Delete Section 2730- 
entirety. 



'District Definition", in its 



'District Deliniations" , in its 



3. Insert Section 2720 — "Flood Plain District and 
Floodway District Deliniations". 

The Flood Plain District and Floodway District is 
herein established as an overlay district. The underlying 
permitted uses are allowed provided that they meet the 
following additional requirements as well as those of the 
Massachusetts State Building Code dealing with construc- 
tions in floodplains. The Flood Plain District and Flood- 
way District includes all special flood hazard areas 
designated on the Chelmsford Flood Plain and Floodway 
District Map, dated 1980, on file with the Town Clerk, 
Planning Board and Building Inspector. The Maps as 
well as the accompanying Chelmsford Flood Insurance 
Study, dated December, 1979, are incorporated herein 
by reference. 

4. Insert Section 2744. In the floodway, designated on 
the Chelmsford Flood Plain and Floodway District 
Map, the following provisions shall apply: 

1. All encroachments including fill, new con- 



struction, substantial improvements to existing 
structures, and other development are pro- 
hibited unless certification by a registered pro- 
fessional engineer is provided by the applicant 
demonstrating that such encroachment shall not 
result in any increase in flood levels during the 
occurrence of the 100-year flood. 

2. Any encroachment meeting the above stan- 
dard shall comply with the floodplain re- 
quirements of the State Building Code. 

Selectman Emerson moved to recess the Adjourned 
Annual Town Meeting at 8:10 PM due to a Special Town 
Meeting that was called for and posted for on May 5, 
1980 at 8:00 PM. Motion Carried by voice vote to recess. 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 5, 1980 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 8:11 
PM by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. who recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum. There were 909 voters 
present. Selectman Towle moved that the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and the posting of the war- 
rant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman 
Towle then moved that the reading of the entire warrant 
be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$150,000.00, and transfer the sum of $350,000.00 from 
the following accounts: 

Assessors Department: 

Line Item 15. -CM A Compensation $ 1,000.00 

Highway Department: 

Line Item 94. - Labor-Men 30,000.00 

Line Item 99. -Snow & Ice 102,000.00 

Selectmen's Department: 

Line Item 212. -Clerk (Part Time) 2,000.00 

Unclassified Department: 

Line Item 266.— Bus Transportation 

Subsidy 30,984.51 

Landfill Development 

Article 35- Annual Town Meeting 1977 91,299.80 

Land Appraisal — Landfill 

Article 36- Annual Town Meeting 1977 50.00 

Land Appraisal — Graniteville Road 

Article 2-Special Town Meeting 6/29/78 5,655.00 

Update Town History — Article Account 995 . 0C 

Police Department — New Cruisers 

Article 1 1 - Annual Town Meeting 1979 3 , 745 . 55 

Fire Department — Purchase Auto 

Article 14- Annual Town Meeting 1979 1,297.50 



39 



Highway Department — New Equipment 
Article 15 — Annual Town Meeting 1979 

Park Department — Purchase Tractor 
Article 16 — Annual Town Meeting 1979 

Purchase Land — Landfill 

Article 58 — Annual Town Meeting 1979 
Article 59 — Annual Town Meeting 1979 
Article 60 — Annual Town Meeting 1979 
Article 61 —Annual Town Meeting 1979 



19,094.72 



55.00 



4,200.00 

3,625.00 

3,925.00 

15,325.00 



Cemetery Department — New Equipment 

Article 4 — Special Town Meeting — 5/14/79 4,453.00 



Study Septic Disposal — Landfill 

Article 4 — Special Town Meeting 2/1/79 



435.90 



Reserve Fund 29,859.02 

for the purpose of renovating the McFarlin School to be 
used as Town Offices. 

Selectman Emerson gave a brief explanation of Article 
1 and asked for the support of the Town Meeting Body. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of Article 1 . 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Jack Luskin moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$15,000.00 for the demolition and razing of that struc- 
ture known as "B" Building, located at the Westlands 
School on Dalton Road, and that said "B" Building be 
demolished and razed prior to September 1, 1980, and 
that the site then be used for school purposes. 

The Finance Committee was in favor of this article. A 
brief discussion followed concerning the amount stated in 
the article. The Selectman explained why this amount 
was needed. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 John Peters, Chairman of the 
School Committee moved that the Town vote to borrow 
the sum of $596,000.00 for the purpose of school building 
capital improvements and preservation including energy 
conservation components and authorize the School Com- 
mittee to proceed with the work of said projects and to 
enter into all necessary contracts and agreements in 
respect thereto, and to do all other acts necessary. 

John Peters, Chairman of the School Committee, gave 
a presentation explaining the purpose of this article. The 
Finance Committee recommends passage of the article. A 
lengthy discussion followed. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote on the article, which left the chair in doubt. 
The following tellers were asked to come forward and 
take a hand count. 

Carolyn Bennett Carl Olsson Myra Silver 

Normand LeBrecque Richard Burtt Gordon Reed 

George Baxendale Sandra Kilbum Margaret Johnson 

Dennis McHugh Dorothy Lerer Stratos Dukakis 

Neil Lerer Carol Stark 



The result of the hand count was Yes 620 No 120 Mo- 
tion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to transfer from Free Cash the sum of 
$15,000.00 to be expended by the Superintendent of In- 
sect Pest Control for the timely alleviation of the gypsy 
moth infestation in affected areas of the Town. 

Eli Safdie, member of the Mosquitoe and Gypsy Moth 
Committee moved that the motion be amended to read as 
follows: By striking the sum of $15,000.00 and substitu- 
ting therefore the sum of $60,000.00. 

Mr. Safdie gave a presentation on the amendment. 
Other members of the Committee spoke in favor of the 
amendment. The Finance Committee was against the 
motion to amend. Dolores McGuire moved the question 
to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on 
stopping debate. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator then asked for a voice vote on Mr. Safdie's mo- 
tion to amend. Motion defeated by voice vote. Dolores 
McGuire then moved the question to stop debate on the 
main motion. Motion carried unanimously. The 
Moderator then asked for a voice vote on the Main Mo- 
tion, which left the chair in doubt, the tellers came for- 
ward and a hand count was taken. Yes 445 No 258 Mo- 
tion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Joan E. Linehan moved that the 
Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws 
and Zoning Map to change from Single Residence 
District (RB) to create a new District, Mobile Home 
Residence District (RMH), the land situated on the 
southerly side of Littleton Road (Route 110) beginning at 
land now or formerly of Giras; thence in a southerly 
direction by two courses by land of Giras and Howard, 
630 feet, more or less, and 115 feet, more or less, to a 
point; thence, in a southwesterly direction by two courses 
by land, now or formerly, of St. Onge, 325 feet, more or 
less, and 945 feet, more or less, to Beaver Brook, 750 feet, 
more or less, to a point at land of the Chelmsford Elks; 
thence in a northwesterly direction by said land, 845 feet, 
more or less, to the southerly side of said Littleton Road 
(Route 110); thence in a northeasterly direction by the 
southerly side of said Littleton Road, 1750 feet, more or 
less, to the point of beginning. 

Containing 38 acres, more or less, and being, in part, 
Land Court Case No 9771A. 

The Moderator then stated that he felt Article 6 was in 
conjunction with Article 5 and he read that motion also. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Joan Linehan moved that the 
Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law, 
Section 2300 — Use Regulation Schedule, Residential 
Uses, Mobile Home in an RMH District (Mobile Home 
Residential District) by inserting P and adding Footnote 6 
to such insertion as follows: 

"6. Intensity of use shall be limited to permit a 
maximum of seven (7) units per acre." 



40 



James Geary, representing the owner of the land that 
the trailer park is situated on gave a presentation and ex- 
plained the purpose of the article. The Moderator then 
asked if the Planning Board had any recommendation on 
this particular zoning proposal. Chairman of the Plann- 
ing Board, Henrick Johnson gave the Board's recommen- 
dation on article 5: 

Based on its review of this amendment and its public 
hearing held on April 23, 1980, the Planning Board 
voted with six (6) members present, three (3) in favor, 
and three (3) opposed. Therefore we moved to be neither 
for or against this article. Planning Board Member Ann 
McCarthy, who had voted against recommendation at 
the April 23rd meeting, explained why she felt this article 
should not be passed. The Finance Committee did not 
recommend article 5 . Selectman John Carson expressing 
the majority vote of the Board of Selectmen, spoke 
against article 5. Selectman Ready representing the 
minority of the Board of Selectmen expressed spoke in 
favor of article 5. A lengthy discussion followed. James 
Geary moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on stopping debate on Articles 5 
and 6, which left the chair in doubt. The tellers came for- 
ward and a hand count was taken Yes 698 No 26, Motion 
Carried to stop debate on Articles 5 and 6. The 
Moderator took a voice vote on Article 5, which left the 
chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and a hand 
count was taken Yes 576 No 137 Motion Carried. 

The Moderator then took a hand count on Article 6. 
Yes 570 No 64 Motion Carried. 

Selectman Ready moved for reconsideration of Article 
6 in order to amend the article. Motion Carried, by voice 
vote. 



Edward McKeon made a motion to stop debate. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote on Selectman Ready's motion to amend. Mo- 
tion Carried, unanimously. Planning Board member 
Ann McCarthy moved to amend the main motion as 
amended to read "Intensity of use shall be limited to per- 
mit a maximum of 4.75 units per acre. Ann McCarthy 
asked for Town Counsel's ruling on her amendment. 
Town Counsel James Harrington, felt that if in fact this 
amendment was passed then there would be a limit of on- 
ly 180 trailers allowed in that zone. 

Jack Bouknight moved the question to stop debate. 
Motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator then asked 
for a voice vote on Ann McCarthy's motion to amend. 
Motion defeated. The Moderator then asked for a voice 
vote on the main motion to amend. Motion carried, 
unanimously. Article 6 now reads: 

"6. Intensity of use shall be limited to permit a 
maximum of seven (7) units per acre" or a max- 
imum of 254 mobile homes per mobile home 
residential district whichever is less. 

Joan Linehan moved for reconsideration of Article 5. 
Motion defeated by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to grant by deed of the Selectmen a portion of the 
premises owned by the Town of Chelmsford as set forth 
on Assessors' Map, Plat 7, Block 3, Lot 3, for considera- 
tion to be determined, said portion being described as 
follows: 

PARCEL B 



UNDER ARTICLE 6. Selectman Ready moved to 
amend the article to read after the words (7) units per 



"or a maximum of 254 mobile homes per mobile 
home residential district whichever is less. 

Selectman Ready felt that by adding the above men- 
tioned amendment then the area in question would be 
limited to a maximum of 254 trailers which is the present 
number of units there now. The Finance Committee was 
in favor of Selectman Ready's motion to amend. 

The Moderator made a point of order as he felt that 
the Planning Board gave their recommendation under 
Article 5 for Article 6 also. Due to the Town Clerk not hav- 
ing any record of this being done, the Chairman of the 
Planning Board gave the Boards recommendation for Ar- 
ticle 6 at this time: Based on its review of this amendment 
and its public hearing held on April 23, 1980, the Plann- 
ing Board voted with six (6) members present, three (3) in 
favor, and three (3) opposed. Therefore we move to be 
neither for or against this article. 

Selectman Carson stated that the Selectmen who were 
present voted unanimously to support Selectman Ready's 
motion to amend. 



A Triangular piece of land beginning at a stone bound 
drill hole on the northeasterly side of Princeton Street 
marking the southwesterly corner of land of the Town of 
Chelmsford; thence, N. 34° 35" 42" W., 144.41 feet to a 
point in the northerly line of said land of the Town of 
Chelmsford; thence S 68° 31' 51" E., 9.00 feet to a stone 
bound drill hole marking the northeasterly corner of the 
above mentioned land of the Town of Chelmsford; 
thence, S. 46° 49' 25" W., 148.03 feet to the point of 
beginning. 

Containing 602 square feet. 

All as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Chelmsford, Mass." prepared for the Town of Chelms- 
ford at a scale of 1 inch =20 feet, dated April, 1980 by 
Fleming, Bienvenu & Associates, Inc., Engineers and 
Surveyors, Billerica, Ma. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of the 
article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1.00 for the purpose of purchasing a certain parcel of 
land from the Bay Bank/Middlesex, NA being a portion 
of the premises located at 40 Vinal Square, Chelmsford, 



41 



Massachusetts, and shown on Assessors' Map, Plat 7, 
Block 3, Lot 2 A; said portion being described as follows: 

PARCEL C 

Beginning at a stone bound drill hole in the northerly 
line of land of the Town of Chelmsford at the Corner of 
land of Traub and The Bay Bank, Middlesex NA; thence 
N. 25° 28' 09" E., by the line of the mentioned land of 
Traub and the Bay Bank, Middlesex NA., 21.55 feet to a 
point; thence, S. 47° 00' 07" E/. 58.58 feet to a point in 
the northerly line of said land of the Town of Chelms- 
ford; thence, by said northerly line of said land of the 
Town of Chelmsford, S. 68° 31' 51" E., 56.00 feet to the 
point of beginning. 



ment Budget from line item 123 — Books & Periodicals, to 
line item 124 — other expenses. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of passage of this 
article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $9,000.00 
within the Police Department Budget from line item 
139 — Officers and Administration to line item 
142 — Maintenance and Equipment. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 



Containing 602 square feet. 

All as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Chelmsford, Mass." prepared for the Town of Chelms- 
ford at a scale of 1 inch=20 feet, dated April, 1980 by 
Fleming, Bienvenu & Associates, Inc., Engineers and 
Surveyors, Billerica, Mass. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of the 
article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Chairman of the Recreation 
Commission, Bruce MacDonald, moved that the Town 
vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53D, an Act permitting 
towns to establish Recreation and Park Self -Supporting 
Service Revolving Funds. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of this 
article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Chairman of the Library 
Trustees, Howard K. Moore, moved that the Town vote 
to transfer the sum of $500.00 within the Library Depart- 
ment Budget from line item 123 — Books & Periodicals, to 
line item 121— Repair and Maintenance. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of the 
i article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Chairman of the Library 
ITrustees, Howard K. Moore, moved that the Town vote 
ito transfer the sum of $1,100.00 within the Library 
CDepartment Budget from line item 119 — Custodial & 
)Security, to line item 121— Repair & Maintenance. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of the 
mrticle. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Chairman of the Library 
Trustees, Howard K. Moore moved that the Town vote to 
ransfer the sum of $400.00 within the Library Depart- 



Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws, Arti- 
cle VI — Police Regulations — Section 20 — Prohibition on 
Leaving Motor Vehicles in Certain Private Ways, by ad- 
ding the following paragraph numbered 6: 

"6. In the absence of the operator of any motor 
vehicle violating any provision of this By-Law, it 
shall be deemed prima facie evidence that the 
registered owner of such vehicle was the 
operator." 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$10,000.00 for the purchase of one (1) three yard sander 
for the Highway Department, under the supervision of 
the Board of Selectmen. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Chairman of the School Com- 
mittee John W. Peters moved that the Town vote to fur- 
ther increase the budget limit established under Chapter 
151 of the Acts of 1979 for the School Department so that 
the School Department Budget for fiscal year 1980 shall 
be increased by the specific amount of $. 

John Peters moved to dismiss the above article. Motion 
Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to further increase the appropriations 
and budget limit established under Chapter 151 of the 
Acts of 1979 so that the Town's appropriations and 
budget limit for Fiscal Year 1980 shall be increased by the 
specific amount of $15,000.00. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 



42 



Norman LeBrecque moved to reconsideration of Arti- 
cle 14. Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Mr. LeBrecque asked for an ex- 
planation of this article. Chief McKeon explained that 
this would aide the Police Department with the present 
parking in fire lanes by-law. Presently the cruiser has to 
wait for the operator of the vehicle to arrive at the car 
before a ticket can be given. If this article passes, then the 
officer can ticket the car in question and be on his way 
back out on patrol. It would be considered a non- 
criminal disposition. Edward Hilliard spoke in favor of 
the article. 

Edward McKeon moved the question to stop debate. 
Motion carried unanimously by voice vote. 

A voice vote was taken on the main motion. Motion 
carried. 

Selectman Towle moved to adjourn the Special Town 
Meeting Sine die, Motion Carried, unanimously. The 
Special Town Meeting adjourned at 11:00 PM. 



Treasurer/Tax Collector 

Brian Beauregard 



Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. 
Town Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



Selectman Towle moved to adjourn the recessed Ad- 
journed Annual Town Meeting until Monday Evening 
May 12, 1980 at the McCarthy Jr. High. Motion Carried, 
unanimously. This meeting adjourned at 11:01 PM. 



Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. 
Town Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 12, 1980 

The Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, called the meeting 
to order at 7:40 PM and recognized the presence of a 
quorum. There were 363 voters present. The Moderator 
then presented the Students from Chelmsford High who 
were going to participate in Student Government Day on 
Friday, May 16, 1980. The Moderator announced the 
Students names and their positions that they were elected 
or appointed to: 



Board of Selectmen 

Timothy Colpoys (CH) 
Paul Murphy 
Bruce Colby 
Sara Kent 
Robert McClure 

School Committee 
Kate Bolger (CH) 
Pam Brown 
Christopher McKeown 
Nicole Simms 
Eugene Evon 



Supt. of Streets 

T.J. Sullivan 

Park Commissioner 

Lorraine Brooks 



Building Inspector 

Scott Shakley 

Electrical Inspector 

Mark Mabury 



Finance Committee 

Therese Kilmartin 
Sandi Metheny 
Laura Paisley 



Board of Health 

Sandra Pannabecker (CH) Cemetery 

Viia Valge Richard Vigeant 

Sean Fitzpatrick 



Board of Assessors 
Karen Christman (CH) 
Douglas Wilkins 
Donna Tobin 

Appointed Bds. & Offs. 

Planning Board 

Linda Dempster 
Steven Partridge 
William Fay 

Supt. of Schools 

Christine Pokorney 

Fire Chief 

Lisa Deely 



Veteran's Agent 
Kirsten Lammers 

Conservation Commission 

Patrick McAndrews 

Town Clerk 

Eric Ames 

Recreation Commission 

Edward Maybury 

Police Chief 

Keith McGarvey 

Administrative Assistant 

Susanne Winter 

Town Accountant 

Leslie Siddeley 



The Moderator offered his congratulations to the Stu- 
dents, and explained the Town Meeting process. 

The Moderator moved to take up the School Budget: 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

174. School Committee 

175. Superintendent's Office 

176. Supervision 

177. Principals 

178. Teaching 

179. Textbooks 

180. Library 

181. Audio/Visual 

182. Guidance 

183. Career Education 

184. School Attendance 

185. Health Services 

186. Transportation 

187. Food Services 

188. Athletics 

189. Other Student Activities 

190. Custodial 

191. Utilities 

192. Maintenance of Grounds 

193. Maintenance of Buildings 

194. Maintenance of Equipment 

195. Adult Education 

196. Civic Activities 

197. Programs with Other Schools 
Sub-Total 

Chapter 766 
Total 

Minus PL 874 



Finance Committee 

Recommendation 

$ 38,200.00 

348,657.00 

297,716.00 

723,048.00 

8,925,304.00 

135,536.00 

266,583.00 

116,457.00 

442,814.00 

0.00 

23,504.00 

126,376.00 

700,680.00 

46,483.00 

153,235.00 

45,364.00 

735,664.00 

654,500.00 

37,450.00 

59, "700. 00 

125,658.00 

7,000.00 

0.00 

12,000.00 

14,021,929.00 
1 ,474,071.00 

15,496,000.00 
- 143,400.00 



43 



Sub-Total 

Minus Educational Collaborative 

TOTAL TOWN FUNDS 

Motion Carried, unanimously 



15,352,600.00 
- 21,800.00 
15,330,800.00 



UNDER ARTICLE 24 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
to dismiss the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 27 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$60,000.00 to be expended for the timely alleviation of 
the Gypsy Moth Infestation in affected areas of the Town. 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee moved to 
amend this article to read the sum of $15,000.00. Mr. 
Ripsom explained the purpose of the amendment. Mr. 
Safdie of the Mosquito and Gypsy Moth Committee 
spoke against the motion to amend. A discussion follow- 
ed. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion 
to amend. Motion Carried. The Moderator then asked 
for a voice vote on the main motion as amended. Motion 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31 Chairman of the Assessors, 
Janet Lombard, moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $250,000.00 to contract with a 
firm for the purpose of equalization of real estate values 
in preparation for implementation of Chapter 797 of the 
Acts of 1979, the Classification Amendment. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

A number of residents spoke against the article, and a 
number of residents spoke in favor. A lengthy discussion 
followed. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the ar- 
ticle, which left the chair in doubt, the following tellers 
came forward and a hand count was taken: 

George Baxendale Sandy Kilburn Margaret Johnson 

Neil Lerer Richard Burtt Dorothy Lerer 

Dick Sullivan Robert Dion Vicki Cooper 

Kenneth Demers Gordon Reed 

The result of the hand count Yes: 76 No 198 Motion 
Defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 44 Chairman of the Planning 
Board, Henrick Johnson, moved that the Town vote to 
amend Section 2300 — "Use Regulations Schedule" of the 
Zoning By-Laws by adding thereto, after "Light 
Industry" in the Category of "Industrial Uses," the follow- 
ing use: 

"Pedestrian and 
Vehicular Access 
and Egress by Pri- 
vate Way to and 
from Uses Permit- 
ted in an IA Dis- 
trict." 

Mr. Johnson then gave the Planning Board's recom- 
mendation on this article: Based on its review of this 



RA RB RC RM CA CB CC CD IA IS 



OOOOOPBOOPO 



amendment and its public hearing held on March 26, 
1980, the Planning Board recommends adoption of Arti- 
cle 44. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of the 
article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 45 Melvin Dejager, moved that the 
Town vote to delete the following Section from the 
Town's Zoning By-Law: 

"Section 3253: No process shall be used which 
creates visual or audible interference in any 
radio or television receivers off the premises or 
causes fluctuations in excess of ten percent in 
line voltage off the premises." 

Chairman of the Planning Board, Henrick Johnson 
gave the Board's recommendation on this article: Based 
on its review of this amendment and its public hearing 
held on April 9, 1980, the Planning Board voted 
unanimously against adoption of Article 45. 

The Finance Committee does not recommend the arti- 
cle. A number of voters spoke in favor of the motion. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on this article. Motion 
Defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 46 John McCormack of the Con- 
servation Committee, moved that the Town vote to 
amend the By-laws relating to the Use of Chelmsford 
Conservation Reservations by adding to No. 2: 

"Without the express written consent of the Con- 
servation Commission, to be evidenced by a per- 
mit to be issued in the discretion of the Commis- 
sion upon proper application, and the holder of 
said permit to be subject to all conditions stated 
thereon." 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee moved to 
amend this motion and to read as follows: 

"Without the express written consent of the Con- 
servation Commission, to be evidenced by a per- 
mit issued by the Commission upon proper ap- 
plication, and the holder of said permit to be 
subject to all conditions stated thereon." 

John McCormack of the Conservation Commission, 
supported the motion to amend. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend, Motion carried. The Moderator then asked for a 
voice vote on the main motion as amended, motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 47 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to accept the following mentioned 
streets as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown 
by their reports and plans duly filed in the Office of the 
Town Clerk, and to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$0.00 for the purpose of reconstructing the following 
mentioned Streets: 



44 



Progress Avenue 
Scientia Drive 



Industrial Avenue 
Hope Street 



Providing all construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such require- 
ments have been met. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 



UNDER ARTICLE 51 George Ripsom of the Finance 
Committee, moved to dismiss this article. Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 52 Chairman of the School Com- 
mittee John W. Peters moved that the Town vote to in- 
crease the School Department Budget Limit established 
by Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 by $442,232,32 so that 
the budget limit for fiscal year 1980-1981 as so increased 
will be $15,352,600.00. 



Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 48 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to convey all right, title and interest, if any, held by the 
Town in a certain parcel of land for consideration to be 
determined, in a parcel of land and buildings thereon, if 
any, located on Dover Street and Shore Drive, Plat 45, 
Lot 18, containing approximately 6,750 square feet. 

The Selectman asked the Moderator for permission to 
have Michael Jamgochian who is not a resident of the 
Town speak on his behalf. The Moderator asked Mr. 
Jamgochian to step forward and speak. Mr. Jamgochian 
explained that he presently owns a piece of land next to 
the land mentioned in the article, and he wanted to buy 
this land in order to have enough total land to build a 
house on and moved into the Town. 

The Finance Committee supports the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 49 George Ripsom of the Finance 
Committee moved that the Town vote to instruct the 
Board of Assessors to issue $1,100,000.00 from Free Cash 
in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for the 
current fiscal period. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 50 Priscilla Leyman, moved that 
the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law, 
Section 2300 — Use Regulations Schedule, Business Uses, 
Restaurant, in a CA District (Neighborhood Commer- 
cial) by deleting O and inserting P and adding Footnote 5 
to such insertion as follows: 



The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 53 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved 
that the Town vote to increase the appropriations limit 
established by Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 by 
$1,153,741.31 so that the appropriations limit for fiscal 
year 1980-1981 as so increased will be $23,295,929.95. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved that the Town vote to 
increase the levy limit established by Chapter 151 of the 
Acts of 1979, by not more than $1,337,623. so that the 
levy limit as so increased will not be more than $23,940,- 
943. for fiscal year 1980-1981. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Selectman Bonita Towle moved to adjourn the annual 
Town Meeting Sine die. Motion carried, unanimously. 
The meeting adjourned at 9:25 PM 

Annual Town Meeting April 28, 1980; TOTAL R&A 
$25,731,222.95; TOTAL TRANSFERS $459,071.00 

Special Town Meeting, May 5, 1980; TOTAL R&A 
$175,001.00; TOTAL TRANSFERS $376,000.00. 



Daniel J. Coughlinjr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



"5. Maximum seating capacity shall be thirty 
(30) and no alcoholic beverages shall be sold or 
consumed on the premises." 

Chairman of the Planning Board, Henrick Johnson, 
gave the Board's recommendation: Based on its review of 
this amendment and its public hearing held April 9, 
1980, the majority of the Planning Board voted to recom- 
mend adoption of Article 50. 

The Finance Committee was against the article. A 
number of voters spoke for and against the article. A 
discussion followed. The moderator asked for a voice 
vote, which left the chair in doubt. The tellers came for- 
ward and a hand count was taken: Yes 210 No 70 Motion 
Carried. 



45 



TOWN WARRANT 
FOR STATE PRIMARY 

September 16, 1980 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote 
at: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 

Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 

Precinct 9: 
Precinct 10 
Precinct 1 1 
Precinct 12 



Center School Auditorium 

North Elementary School Auditorium 

Colonel Moses Parker Junior High School 

Band Room 
East Chelmsford School 
Byam School Cafetorium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
North Elementary School Auditorium 
Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 
South Row School Auditorium 
South Row School Auditorium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 



TUESDAY, THE SIXTEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 
1980 from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following pur- 
pose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the can- 
didates of political parties for the following offices: 

REP. IN CONGRESS 5th Congressional Dist. 

COUNCILLOR 3rd Councillor District 

SEN. IN GEN. COURT . . 5th Middlesex Sen. Dist. 
REP. IN GEN. COURT . . . 16th Middlesex Rep. Dist. 

(2) COUNTY COMMS Middlesex County 

SHERIFF Middlesex County 

The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this Second day of September, 
A.D. 1980 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



September 2, 1980 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Center School Auditorium; North Elementary 
School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker Junior High 
School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam 
School Cafetorium; Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCar- 
thy Junior High School; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria, seven days at least before the 
time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A True Copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



Paul C. Hart, Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

John W. Carson, Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Dennis J. Ready 



A True Copy. Attest: 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, Town Clerk 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

James M. Shannon 
Robert F. Hatem 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



46 

DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY 

September 16, 1980 

Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet II Pet 12 Total 



210 
244 



189 1840 
209 2109 



COUNCILOR 

Herbert L. Connolly 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Carol C. Amick 
Virginia E. Mooney 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Write-ins 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 

Michael E. McLaughlin 
S. Lester Ralph 
Thomas J. Larkin 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

SHERIFF 

James A. Breslin 
Charles Leo Buckley 
Joseph Michael Caterina 
Vincent Paul Ciampa 
Thomas A. Corkery 
Edward F. Henneberry Jr. 
Michael A. McLaughlin 
Vincent F. Zabbo 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



2510 
1455 



3053 
690 
220 



304 


256 


449 


222 


437 


363 


262 


274 


245 


398 


283 


393 


3886 


314 


263 


457 


223 


442 


372 


268 


282 


249 


411 


285 


399 


3965 


159 


159 


201 


131 


244 


209 


159 


160 


122 


206 


158 


190 


2098 


111 


67 


147 


60 


134 


128 


84 


88 


94 


125 


94 


151 


1283 


161 


155 


246 


124 


242 


220 


151 


150 


147 


250 


168 


248 


2262 


197 


145 


320 


131 


264 


187 


142 


166 


135 


241 


150 


209 


2287 


628 


526 


914 


446 


884 


744 


536 


564 


498 


822 


570 


798 


7930 


31 


22 


24 


21 


45 


33 


15 


21 


15 


44 


13 


35 


319 


11 


31 


31 


12 


43 


20 


25 


33 


29 


39 


18 


33 


325 



583 
318 
1319 
442 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

William C. Sawyer 

Write-ins 

Blanks 



REPUBLICAN PRIMARY 

September 16, 1980 



Pet 1 Pet 2 PctS Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 



COUNCILLOR 

Write-ins 
Blanks 



606 
609 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Write-ins 
Blanks 



595 
609 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Bruce N. Freeman 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) 

Write-ins 
Blanks 



SHERIFF 

Philip T. Razook 
Blanks 



1189 
1218 



47 



TOWN WARRANT 
FOR STATE ELECTION 

November 4, 1980 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby re- 
quired to notify and warn the inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in elections to vote at: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 

Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 

Precinct 9: 
Precinct 10 
Precinct 11 
Precinct 12 



Center School Auditorium 

North Elementary School Auditorium 

Colonel Moses Parker Junior High School 

Cafeteria 
East Chelmsford School 
Byam School Cafetorium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
North Elementary School Auditorium 
Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 
South Row School Auditorium 
South Row School Auditorium 
Westlands School Cafeteria 
Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 



TUESDAY, THE FOURTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 
1980 from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following pur- 
pose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the election of 
candidates for the following offices: 

ELEC. OF PRES. & VP Comm. of Mass. 

REP. IN CONGRESS 5th Congressional Dist. 

COUNCILLOR 3rd Councillor Dist. 

SEN. IN GEN. COURT . . .5th Middlesex Sen. Dist. 
REP. IN GEN. COURT . . . 16th Middlesex Rep. Dist. 

(2) COUNTY COMMS Middlesex County 

SHERIFF Middlesex County 

QUESTIONS TO BE VOTED ON 

QUESTION 1 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT 
TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amend- 
ment to the Constitution summarized below, 
which was approved by the General Court in YES 
joint sessions of the House of Representatives NO 
and the Senate on September 7, 1977, by a vote 
of 262-1, and on May 28, 1980, by a vote of 
192-0? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would add a new article to the 
state Constitution which would prohibit discrimination 
against handicapped people. It would provide that no 



otherwise qualified handicapped individual could, on the 
sole basis of that handicap, be excluded from participa- 
tion in, denied the benefits of, or subjected to discrimina- 
tion in any program or activity. 

QUESTION 2 

LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, 
which was dissapproved by the House of Repre- YES 
sentatives on May 6, 1980, by a vote of 5-146, NO 
and on which no vote was taken by the Senate _ \t. 

before May 7, 1980? qCf9^" ■ 

SUMMARY 5^ 

The proposed law would limit certain taxes, and change 
laws relating to school budgets and compulsory binding 
arbitration. It would impose a limit on state and local 
taxes on real estate and personal property equal to 2^ % 
of the full and fair cash value of the property being taxed. 
If a locality currently imposes a tax greater than 2V£ % of 
that cash value, the tax would have to be decreased by 
15% each year until the 2V& % level is reached. If a locali- 
ty currently imposes a tax of less than 2 V6 % , it would not \ 
be allowed to increase the tax rate. In either situation, a 
city or town could raise its limit by a % local vote at a 
general election. 

The proposed law would provide that the local taxes on 
real estate and personal property imposed by the state or 
by localities could never be increased by more than 21/6 % 
of the total taxes imposed for the preceding year, unless 
two thirds of the voters agreed to the increase at a general 
election. 

It would further provide that no law or regulation 
which imposes additional costs on a city or town, or a law 
granting or increasing tax exemptions, would be effective 
unless the state agrees to assume the added cost. A divi- 
sion of the State Auditor's Department would determine 
the financial effect of laws and regulations on the various 
localities. 

The proposal would limit the amount of money re- 
quired to be appropriated for public schools to that 
amount voted upon by the local appropriating authority. 
It would also repeal the law which provides for com- 
pulsory binding arbitration when labor negotiations con- 
cerning police and fire personnel come to an impasse. In 
addition, the petition would provide that no county, 
district, ot authority could impose any annual increase in 
costs on a locality of greater than 4% of the total of the 
year before. 

The proposed law would also reduce the maximum ex- 
cise tax rate on motor vehicles from $66 per thousand to 
$25 per thousand, and it would allow a state income tax 
deduction equal to one half of the rent paid for the tax- 
payer's principal place of residence. 

QUESTION 3 

LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 



Do you approve of a law summarized below, 
which was disapproved the House of Repre- 
sentatives on May 6, 1980, by a vote of 2-147, 
and on which no vote was taken by the Senate 
before May 7, 1980? 



YES 
NO 



48 



SUMMARY 

The proposed law would limit local property taxes and 
state taxes and would provide for increased state aid for 
local educational purposes. 

The act would limit local property taxes in the years 
1981 through 1984 to the amount levied in the previous 
year increased by the percentage increase in personal in- 
come of the residents of the Commonwealth during the 
previous year. The local property tax limit could be ex- 
ceeded to offset decreases in local aid, to cover shortages 
for prior years and to pay court judgments. Pension and 
retirement allowances, payments to other governmental 
units, principal and interest on any indebtedness, un- 
employment compensation, amounts required to be rais- 
ed as a condition of a state or federal grant, and costs for 
special education programs would be excluded from the 
property tax limit. 

These local limits would be reduced by any excess taxes 
actually collected over the tax limit for the preceding 
year. The limit would not apply to any municipality hav- 
ing a general tax rate of less than $35 per thousand of 
equalized valuation. The tax limit could be exceeded by a 
two-thirds vote of the local appropriating body. 

The cost of regional and independent vocational 
schools would be subject to the same limitations. 

The proposed law would also limit state taxes imposed 
in the years 1981 through 1984 to an amount no greater 
than that imposed the previous year, increased by the 
percentage increase in the personal income of Massachu- 
setts residents in the previous year. This state tax limit 
could be exceeded only to increase local aid or to assume 
other costs approved by a two-thirds vote of the state 
legislature. The amounts necessary to pay principal and 
interest on state indebtedness, pensions, retirement 
allowances, unemployment compensation, and court 
judgments, and money required to be raised as a condi- 
tion of a federal grant would not be subject to the state 
tax limit. The total amount of local aid for any year 
which would be subject to legislative appropriation could 
not be less than the total amount of aid for the preceding 
year increased by half the increase in collected state taxes 
during the preceding year. The state tax limit would be 
reduced by any excess taxes actually collected over the tax 
limit for the preceding year. 

The proposed law also would require, subject to 
legislative appropriation, a gradual increase in the 
percentage of local educational costs paid by the Com- 
monwealth to a level of 50% in 1984. The proposal would 
also require, again subject to legislative appropriation, 
that school aid paid by the Commonwealth in any year 
between 1981 through 1984 must be at least 15% greater 
than that provided in 1980. 



QUESTION 4 

REFERENDUM ON AN EXISTING LAW 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was 
approved by the House of Representatives on YES 
November, 1, 1979, by a vote of 83-62, and NO 
which was approved by the Senate on November 
1, 1979? 

SUMMARY 

The law provides for increases in the salaries of mem- 
bers of the legislature and the constitutional officers of 



the Commonwealth. 

The law increases salaries of members of the legislature 
by an annual amount varying from $1,853 to $17,923. 
The size of the raise conferred on a particular individual 
depends upon his position with the legislature. The law 
has the effect of setting the base salary for a legislator at 
$20,335, but under the law legislative salaries range as 
high as the approximately $55,920 paid to the President 
of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Represen- 
tatives. 

The salaries of the constitutional officers are increased 
either by $20 , 000 , in the case of the Governor , of $ 1 , 000 
in all other cases. The law raises the annual salary of the 
Governor to $60,000, that of the Attorney General to 
$47,500, and the salaries of the Lieutenant Governor, 
Secretary of the Commonwealth, Treasurer and Receiver 
General, and the Auditor to $40,000. 

The law also amends the statutes pertaining to the 
organization of the offices of the Secretaries of Ad- 
ministration and Finance and of Human Services and to 
the compensation of senior officials within those offices. 
It gives the Secretaries of Administration and Finance 
and of Human Services greater flexibility in establishing 
positions and setting salaries for those under their super- 
vision. 

QUESTION 5 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT 
TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the 
Constitution summarized below, which was ap- YES 
proved by the Genral Court in joint sessions of NO 
the House of Representatives and the Senate on 
November 30, 1977, by a vote of 257-8, and on 
September 18, 1980, by a vote of 179-6? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would limit the power of the 
legislature to impose certain costs on cities and towns. It 
would provide that any law which imposes additional 
costs upon two or more cities or towns by regulating the 
compensation, hours, status, conditions, or benefits of 
municipal employment would not be effective within a 
municipality until it accepts the law by vote or appropria- 
tion of money. Local acceptance would not be required if 
the legislature either passed the law by a two-thirds vote, 
or provided, during the same session in which the law was 
enacted, that the additional costs would be assumed by 
the Commonwealth. 

QUESTION 6 

PROPOSED AMENDMENT 
TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the 
Constitution summarized below, which was approved by 
the General Court in joint sessions of the House YES 
of Representatives and the Senate on September NO 
7, 1977, by a vote of 264-0, and on September 
19, 1980, by a vote of 162-0? 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment would change the pro- 
cedure by which the Legislature declares a measure to be 
an emergency law, making it effective when it is signed by 



49 






the Governor. The amendment would allow the Legisla- 
ture to make such a declaration by a voice vote, rather 
than by a recorded vote, as now required. The amend- 
ment would maintain the existing option allowing for a 
formal roll call vote. 

QUESTION 7 
THIS QUESTION IS NON BINDING 

Shall the Senator from this district be instructed to vote 
in favor of a resolution calling on the federal YES 
government to cease unnecessary spending on NO 
new military programs, and, instead, to spend 
the funds for civilian needs such as construction 
of energy-efficient housing, mass transit, public 
education and health care? 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. October 28, 1980 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Center School Auditorium; North Elementary 
School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker Junior High 
School Cafeteria; East Chelmsford School; Byam School 
Cafetorium; Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 
Junior High School; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria, seven days at least before the 
time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A True Copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this Twentieth day of October, 
A.D. 1980. 

Paul C. Hart, Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Vice Chairman 

John W. Carson, Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Dennis J. Ready 

A True Copy, Attest: 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 



50 



STATE ELECTION 

November 4, 1980 



PRESIDENT and VICE PRESIDENT 



Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pet 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 11 Pet 12 Total 
*The total vote is listed as one more than any other office due to a speeial ballot issued by the Sec. of state 
with just the Pres./and Vice Pres. on it. 



Anderson and Lucey 
Carter and Mondale 
Clark and Koch 
Deberry and Zimmerman 
Reagan and Bush 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

James M. Shannon 

William C. Sawyer 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNCILLOR 

Herbert L. Connolly 
All Others 



TOTAL 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Carol C. Amick 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Bruce N. Freeman 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Michael E. McLaughlin 
Thomas J. Larkin 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

SHERIFF 

Edward F. Henneberry Jr. 

Philip T. Razook 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



254 
427 



2365 
5085 



1441 


1002 


1850 


637 


1901 


1416 


1061 


1165 


1048 


1786 


1061 


1553 


15921" 


760 


642 


1042 


405 


1004 


807 


632 


612 


624 


999 


583 


810 


8920 


606 


315 


730 


204 


818 


553 


379 


513 


376 


719 


440 


685 


6338 








3 




















1 








4 


75 


45 


75 


28 


79 


56 


50 


40 


48 


66 


38 


58 


658 


1441 


1002 


1850 


637 


1901 


1416 


1061 


1165 


1048 


1785 


1061 


1553 


15920 


960 


739 


1261 


489 


1311 


1002 


785 


775 


717 


1212 


763 


1048 


11062 


2 





2 


1 


3 








1 


1 











10 


479 


263 


587 


147 


587 


414 


276 


389 


330 


573 


298 


505 


4848 


1441 


1002 


1850 


637 


1901 


1416 


1061 


1165 


1048 


1785 


1061 


1553 


15920 


1086 


803 


1420 


508 


1459 


1095 


853 


873 


821 


1344 


827 


1170 


12259 


1 


1 


2 


1 





2 


1 


3 





2 








13 


354 


198 


428 


128 


442 


319 


207 


289 


227 


439 


234 


383 


3648 


1441 


1002 


1850 


637 


1901 


1416 


1061 


1165 


1048 


1785 


1061 


1553 


15920 


1223 


839 


1518 


517 


1552 


1189 


894 


992 


866 


1455 


891 


1308 


13244 











1 


3 


2 


2 


1 


3 


2 





1 


15 


218 


163 


332 


119 


346 


225 


165 


172 


179 


328 


170 


244 


2661 


1441 


1002 


1850 


637 


1901 


1416 


1061 


1165 


1048 


1785 


1061 


1553 


15920 


745 


601 


1005 


398 


1036 


806 


686 


604 


589 


965 


647 


830 


8912 


723 


487 


894 


337 


976 


734 


515 


591 


546 


927 


545 


786 


8061 


1 


1 


3 





4 


2 


3 








2 








16 


1413 


915 


1798 


539 


1786 


1290 


918 


1135 


961 


1677 


930 


1490 


14852 


2882 


2004 


3700 


1274 


3802 


2832 


2122 


2330 


2096 


3571 


2122 


3106 


31841 


723 


670 


1025 


426 


985 


856 


647 


567 


599 


955 


644 


765 


8862 


501 


206 


498 


135 


597 


372 


289 


397 


282 


540 


300 


519 


4636 





1 


3 





13 














12 


1 





30 


217 


125 


324 . 


76 


306 


188 


125 


201 


167 


278 


116 


269 


2392 


1441 


1002 


1850 


637 


1901 


1416 


1061 


1165 


1048 


1785 


1061 


1553 


15920 



51 



1227 
533 



1191 
584 



1143 
570 



637 1901 1416 1061 1165 1048 1785 1061 1553 15920 



404 
222 



790 
356 



1160 
605 



979 
566 



9995 
5665 



637 1901 1416 1061 1165 1048 1785 1061 1553 15920 



409 
956 



308 
635 



1196 435 1276 



1002 1850 637 1901 1416 1061 



294 
719 



543 343 498 4728 

1181 654 1009 10452 

61 64 46 740 

1785 1061 1553 15920 



1002 1850 



1901 1416 1061 



189 64 167 1416 

1523 931 1324 13731 

73 66 62 773 

1785 1061 1553 15920 



797 
247 



1180 
470 



1441 1002 1850 637 1901 1416 1061 1165 1048 1785 



115 114 1492 
1061 1553 15920 



278 
624 



495 
1204 



493 
1241 



1441 1002 1850 637 1901 1416 



458 270 419 4218 

1198 675 1024 10227 

129 116 110 1475 

1785 1061 1553 15920 



443 
434 



1441 1002 1850 



722 586 429 452 420 703 431 590 6368 

979 646 501 581 531 928 487 831 7817 

200 184 131 132 97 154 143 132 1735 

1901 1416 1061 1165 1048 1785 1061 1553 15920 



52 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Attention continued to focus on the issue of revaluing 
real estate in compliance with the Department of 
Revenue's 1983 deadline set for all municipalities in the 
Commonwealth. At town meeting, however, the voters 
failed to appropriate the necessary funds and the Depart- 
ment stepped in, informing the town in November that it 
would contract for the services of a revluation firm. The 
town will be charged by the state through the "cherry 
sheet" which is a summary of charges for services and 
distributions of funds. This year also brought with it the 
passage of Proposition 2 14 and its resulting loss in in- 
come. 

Building permit activity remained at the same level this 
year with people again trying to escape escalating fuel 
costs (149 wood stove permits) and mortgage rates by ad- 
ding to existing homes (201 permits for additions). There 
has however been an upswing in commercial/industrial 
building which has added substantially to the tax base. 
There were also two solar permits and one for a windmill 
along with 77 new dwellings, 7 signs, 61 commercial/in- 
dustrial, 23 condominiums, 42 pools, 8 sheds, 9 miscel- 
laneous, 7 to demolish, 12 to repair and 4 for exempt pro- 
perties. Of the total of 597, 7 permits were void. 



The Board lost a valuable member with the resignation 
of Julian Zabierek on December 31st. His contribution to 
the Assessors office and the town was recognized by the 
Board of Selectmen in their unanimous vote to grant him 
accreditation under a 1979 state law. We will miss him on 
the Board but are delighted that his responsibilities with 
the credit union bring him to the Town Hall daily. 

Our Administrative Assistant Diane Phillips, earned 
her designation as a Massachusetts Accredited Assessor 
this year adding to the professional qualifications of the 
Board. Chairman Janet Lombard was appointed to the 
Education Committee of the Mass. Assessors Association 
and as co-chairman of the Education Committee of the 
Middlesex County Assessors Association. 

This coming year promises to be a busy one for the 
Assessors office according to the schedule set by the State 
Department of Revenue. The mandated revaluation pro- 
gram should begin sometime in the spring and continue 
for about one and one half years, to be implemented in 
fiscal 1983. We are also prepared to wade through the 
confusion caused by the implementation of Proposition 
2V^ and are ready to give any assistance we can. 



The following is a summary of exemptions and abate- 
ments for the year. 



JANUARY-DECEMBER 1980 



M.V. Excise Levy of 80 


No. 


Issued 


27,695 


Total Tax 


Abatements Levy of 80 


No. 


Granted 


3,125 


Total Abated 


M.V. Excise Levy of 79 


No. 


Issued 


1,228 


Total Tax 


Abatements Levy of 79 


No. 


Granted 


735 


Total Abated 


M.V. Excise Levy of 78 


No. 


Issued 





Total Tax 


Abatements Levy of 78 


No. 


Granted 


10 


Total Abated 


Excise Abatements 








Total Abated 


Levy of 77 


No. 


Granted 


2 


Total Abated 


Levy of 76 


No. 


Granted 


1 


Total Abated 


Levy of 75 


No. 


Granted 





Total Abated 


Levy of 74 


No. 


Granted 


6 





$1,945,398.93 

142.689.69 

34,049.70 

19,596.81 



228.23 

23.10 

23.10 



523.05 



53 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Everett V. Olsen, Chairman 
Gerald L. Hardy 
Arthur J. Colmer 

George E. Baxendale, Cemetery Superintendent 

In the past year the number of burials in the Chelms- 
ford Cemeteries has increased by thirty percent and the 
number of lots sold by twenty percent. 

New sections have been completed and opened this 
year in Pine Ridge, Fairview, Heart Pond and West 
Chelmsford Cemeteries. In the West Chelmsford 
Cemetery, all available land has now been developed, the 
roads hottopped and new water lines installed. In the 
Pine Ridge Cemetery, we hope to begin work as soon as 
possible to complete the area behind the flagpole which 
faces the main drive. 

All six cemeteries have been maintained, fences 
repaired wherever necessary and foundations installed for 
new monuments. 

Once again we would like to express our appreciation 
for the cooperation of all officials and employees of the 
Town. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Peter Dulchinos, Chairman 
Paul McCarthy Paul J. Canniff D.D.S. 

Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health Health Inspector 

RichardJ. Day John P. Emerson Jr. 

Secretary 
Diana L. Wright 



Town Nurse 
Jean Sinausky 



Board of Health Physician 
Michael A. Gilchrist M.D. 



Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1980 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Pro- 
gram continued its effort to clean up our waterways. The 
Board of Health has been running an extensive dye 
testing and water sampling program and positive results 
are being seen. More than 180 tests have been performed 
by the Department along with the issuance of 89 septic 
system permits (new) and 169 septic system permits 
(repair). 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 
Percolation tests — 89 $1625 

Sewage permits — 246 2,990 

Miscellaneous licenses and fees 2,886 



Complaint and Inspectional Services 

During 1980, 4 inspections were made of Nursing 
Homes; 26 inspections made for Chapter 2 Housing; 
school inspections 18; complaints received and checked 
267; stable inspections 16; Camp Paul inspected 10 times; 
bathing beaches 40 inspections (constant testing during 
the 1-2 week period in which ponds were closed); Certify 
International Travel Vaccination Books 26; restaurants 
and Retail food store inspections 126. 

Hazardous Waste 

The Board of Health, because of the new laws man- 
dated by the State and Federal Governments in the areas 
of hazardous waste, has been called upon to coordinate 
all phases of hazardous waste activities. 

Mr. Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) has 
been appointed by the Board of Selectmen to be Hazar- 
dous Waste Coordinator for this town between State and 
Federal Agencies. 

Hazardous waste has opened up a whole new area to be 
monitored. It is the goal of the Board of Health, along 
with other town departments, to keep abreast of all cur- 
rent changes and updates in the handling of hazardous 
waste and to supercede E.P.A. standards where it would 
best serve this community. 

Communicable Disease Program 

Part of the duties of the Public Health Nurse include 
follow-up on certain reportable diseases as mandated by 
the Mass. Department of Public Health. An epidemiolo- 
gical investigation is undertaken by the Town Nurse and 
the report is submitted to the Department of Public 
Health. Reports on the following diseases were completed 
during 1980: 



Tuberculosis 

Hepatitis 

Shigella 

Pertussis 

Salmonella 

Rubella 

Menningitis 

Legionella Species 



No active cases 

4 cases reported 

No cases 

No cases 

7 cases reported 

No cases 

1 case reported 

1 case reported 



Rabies Clinic 

Administered by Martin Gruber, D.V.M. 
244 dogs were innoculated against rabies. 



a total of 



The testing of persons exposed to active tuberculosis 
and those persons whose employment require certifica- 
tion of freedom from that disease is another responsibility 
of the Town Nurse. Fifty-nine tests were given to the 
Town residents. Home visits are made to families with ac- 
tive tuberculosis on a periodic basis to insure understand- 
ing of the illness and that adequate medical follow-up is 
achieved. 

Maternal Child Health Services 

Telephone correspondence are made to families with 
newborns and premature infants. Home visits are made 
to same families by physician referral. Follow-ups are 
made for health supervision, education and referrals 
when indicated. Eleven cases of premature births were 
reported for 1980. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health sponsored two flu clinics this 
year. The vaccine was offered to the elderly and chroni- 



54 



cally ill persons as recommended by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health. Four-hundred twenty per- 
sons were immunized with flu shots. One-hundred one 
persons were immunized with pneumonia shots. 

Hypertension Program Screening 

Screening clinics are held the first Tuesday of every 
month for the town employees. 

Immunization Program (School) 

The Board of Health worked with the school nurses in 
implementing an immunization program for school aged 
children. Booster immunizations were offered to all 
students in accordance with public health law. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Peter Dulchinos 
Chairman 



CHELMSFORD HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The work of the Housing Authority during the past 
year has been centered around the rehabilitation of the 
McFarlin "B" Building into fifty units of elderly housing. 
Construction began in June 1980 and we look forward to 
McFarlin Manor being ready for occupancy in the Fall of 
1981. A new project the Authority became involved in 
this past year is a program to buy condominiums for the 
elderly. Chelmsford is one of four communities through- 
out the Commonwealth of Massachusetts chosen to par- 
ticipate in this pilot program. 

During 1980 the Authority received a modernization 
grant from the Executive Office of Communities and 
Development in the amount of $70,000 for the Com- 
munity Residence in North Chelmsford. Modernization is 
scheduled to start in late January 1981. 

The Housing Authority continues to be involved in 
three ongoing programs: Chelmsford Arms at 1 Smith 
Street, the Community Residence at 34 Middlesex Street, 
and the Chapter 707 "scattered site" program — all of 
which are funded by the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts through the Executive Office of Communities and 
Development and are managed according to the eligibili- 
ty criteria set forth by them. Chelmsford Arms was com- 
pleted in 1974 and has sixty-four units, fifty-six elderly 
and eight handicapped. The Community Residence was 
purchased in 1974 and has eight units. The Authority 
also has eight units under lease in the private market 
through the Chapter 707 program established in 1975. 

We have forty units under HUD Section 8 Federal Fun- 
ding. These units are managed by Community Team- 
work, Inc. of Lowell. A fourth application for twelve ad- 
ditional units was submitted during 1980. These units 
will be mobile units, meaning apartments may be leased 
outside of the Town of Chelmsford. Mobile units are a 
relatively new idea in housing. A community such as 
Chelmsford, with little rental stock, can benefit by the 
mobility program since this would provide increased 
housing for families and elderly in nearby communities 
having greater rental opportunities. 



These programs are providing a total of one hundred 
and seventy units of low income housing, nineteen of 
which are family and one hundred and fifty one are for 
elderly. Our most recent financial statement lists our 
assets at $1,453,681.05 and our liabilities at $1,419,189.- 
96. The Chelmsford Housing Authority will continue to 
seek and apply for additional funding whenever possible 
to provide more housing for families and the elderly. 

Personnel changes during the past year include a new 
Executive Director, Lisa Shanahan; a full time clerk, 
Helen Cantara; and F. Trevisone who replaces Francis 
Curtis, who passed away this year and had served as our 
tenant in charge evenings and weekends for almost seven 
years. 

Our regular monthly meetings are held in the Com- 
munity Building at Chelmsford Arms, 1 Smith Street, at 
7:30 pm on the first Tuesday ot each month. The annual 
meeting is held the first Tuesday in Mav. All meetings are 
open to the public. 

We would like to thank the residents of Chelmsford 
and the Town Officials for their continued support and 
cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman 

Robert L. Hughes, Vice Chairman 

Richard Monahan, Treasurer 

Claude A. Harvey, Asst. Treasurer 

Pamela Turnbull 



PARK COMMISSION 

The Park Commission reelected Arthur L. Bennett 
Chairman at the annual organizational meeting. 

The department has continued to maintain and 
upgrade the many areas under their supervision. 

The intersection of Parkerville Road and Pond Street 
was cleared, loamed, and seeded with the cooperation of 
the neighborhors and several town departments. We 
would like to see this type of improvement continue. We 
feel the appearance by far outweighs the cost, especially 
with the cooperation and assistance we have received in 
the past. 

The Park Commission would like to thank all Town 
Departments, Garden Clubs, and towns people for their 
continued cooperation and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arthur L. Bennett, Chairman 

Robert W. Wetmore 

Eileen M. Duffy 

Donald P. Gray, Park Superintendent 



55 



PLANNING BOARD 

1980 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. , Chairman Charles A. Parlee 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Vice Chairman Rosalind M. Boyle 
Ann H. McCarthy, Clerk Carolyn J. Fenn 

Eugene E. Gilet Jacqueline Sheehy, Recording Clerk 

1980 proved to be a very active and productive year for 
the Chelmsford Planning Board. A total of twenty-seven 
public hearings were conducted on various subdivisions 
and zoning by-law changes. Twelve Site Plans were 
reviewed and approved and twenty-six Subdivision Con- 
trol Law Not Required plans were approved. 

The Planning Board initiated the formation of a Flood 
Plain-Flood Hazard Committee, consisting of representa- 
tives from the Planning Board, Conservation Commis- 
sion, Board of Appeals, Board of Health and interested 
Chelmsford citizens, to update the Chelmsford Flood 
Plain & Floodway Map for acceptance at Town Meeting. 
Also, in cooperation with the Town Sign Advisory Com- 
mittee, revisions were made to define and clarify the Sign 
By-Law. The Board also made revisions to the Subdivi- 
sion Rules & Regulations on the recommendation of 
Planning Board Engineer, Paul R. Nyquist, and is now in 
the process of updating and reprinting the Zoning By- 
Law booklet. A new updated street map is now available 
through the efforts of the Planning Board and a new zon- 
ing map will be presented for acceptance at the 1981 
Town Meeting. 

During the past year, the Planning Board has reviewed 
sixteen and approved thirteen subdivisions for a total of 
sixty-six new building lots in town — 9 lots on Autumn 
Lane off Hunt Road, 8 lots on Penni Lane off Crooked 
Spring Road, 18 lots on Pinewood Road off Johnson 
Road, 5 lots on Kastraki Place off Proctor Road, 15 lots 
at Deer Run Estates off Freeman Road, 2 lots on Eliza- 
beth Drive off Mill Road, 1 lot on Alpha Road Extension 
and several small subdivisions where road construction 
was waived in favor of a private driveway — 2 lots on 
Packard Lane off Westford Street, 1 lot on Velvet Lane 
off Mansfield Drive, 1 lot on Hancock Drive off Boston 
Road, 2 lots on Hostler Road Extension, 1 lot on Viken 
Drive off Park Road and 1 lot on Taylor Lane off Robin 
Hill Road. 

Under Site Plan Review, the Board approved the 
following plans for new construction — an industrial 
building on Kidder Road, two multi-tenant buildings on 
Alpha Road, one multi-tenant and one research and 
development building on Elizabeth Drive, two office 
buildings on Fletcher Street and an eight unit office con- 
dominium on Summer Street, two building additions to 
Comet Products on Stuart Road and an addition to Han- 
cock Builders on Turnpike Road, a building on Hunt 
Road to house the Cunningham Machine Shop and a 
25,000 sq. ft. retail store building to be constructed at the 
Caldor Shopping Center. 

Mrs. Carolyn Fenn was elected to serve a three-year 
term and replaced Mr. Paul Bartel who decided not to 
seek re-election this year. The Board re-organized and 
elected Mr. Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. as Chairman, Mr. 



Thomas E. Firth, Jr. as Vice Chairman, Ann H. McCar- 
thy as Clerk, Eugene E. Gilet as representative to the 
Northern Middlesex Area Planning Commission, Mrs. 
Carolyn Fenn as representative to the Vinal Square 
Development Project Committee, Mrs. Rosalind Boyle as 
representative to the Capital Planning and Budgeting, 
Mr. Charles A. Parlee served as the Planning Board's 
representative on the Flood Plain-Flood Hazard Commit- 
tee, Mrs. Jacqueline A. Sheehy was reappointed as Recor- 
ding Clerk and Paul R. Nyquist as Planning Board 
Engineer. 

During the past year, the Planning Board has con- 
tinued to promote a spirit of cooperation between the 
various Town Boards relative to the review of Site Plans 
and Subdivisions. The cooperative efforts between the 
Conservation Commission, Board of Health, Fire Depart- 
ment and Water Department and Building Inspector 
have provided the Planning Board and the Planning 
Board Engineer with all the necessary information re- 
quired to make comprehensive decisions on new develop- 
ment in the Town of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Chairman 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelsmford 

Library Trustees 

Howard K. Moore, Chairman Elizabeth McCarthy 

Roger Welch Jim Cooper 

Brenda McDermott Janet Hendl 

1980 was a year of internal library improvements — im- 
provements that largely go unnoticed by the public, but 
that are necessary to keep the library functioning. Those 
improvements included new shelving at Adams Library 
which created space for approximately five more years of 
book acquisitions; added study space in the Fine Arts sec- 
tion at Adams; a security system designed to protect the 
video equipment; a shelf -reading and book labeling pro- 
ject involving the entire staff, designed to make shelving 
and locating the books much easier; and a CETA project, 
which employed four people during the year and ac- 
complished a long overdue partial inventory of the non- 
fiction collection at Adams and a cuttering of the collec- 
tion of Adams, (a book labeling system to make it easier 
for the public to locate material). 

Among the most noticeable improvements in 1980 in- 
cluded the final renovation of the Carriage House into a 
warm inviting meeting space, capable of seating seventy 
people. The Carriage House, renovated by students at 
Nashoba Regional Technical High School, with materials 
funded entirely by private donation, was open for use in 
September 1980, and quickly gained in popularity as a 
meeting space for community groups. Another improve- 



56 



ment included the cranberry and gold sign indicating the 
"Adams Library Children's House" surrounded by plants 
donated and maintained by the Country Lane Garden 
Club. The MacKay Branch Library received a noticeable 
face lifting with landscaping provided by the Golden 
Chain Garden Club. 

A final improvement, was the reregistration process. 
Because of burgeoning and out-of-date files and the need 
to standardize the Chelmsford Public Library card, all 
patrons were issued new library cards. 

In conclusion I would like to acknowledge the continu- 
ing support of community groups such as the Country 
Lane and Golden Chain Garden Clubs whose volunteer 
efforts certainly enhance the library environment. I 
should also like to acknowledge the commitment to ex- 
cellent library service expressed by the dedicated Staff, 
Trustees and Friends of the Library. 

Statistical Report 

Monies deposited with the Town Tresurer 

(fines & state aid) $21,078.93 

Circulation 267,422 

New Cards Issued 2,095 

Employees (full time including CETA) 15 

Employees (part time including NYC) 23 

Assistant Director: William F. Edge, Jr. 

(resigned August, 1980) 

Susanne Sullivan (as of Nov. 1980) 
Department Heads: 

Goldie Creamer (MacKay Branch) 

Lillian Storey (Circulation) 

Bea Beaubien (Children's House) 

Linda Webb (Fine Arts) 

Joan Allard (Reference) 

Marion Lord (Technical Services) 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann E. Gallmeyer 
Director 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Carol A. Olsson, Chairman 

Herbert F. Bennett Janet F. Bonica 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Ex officio 

Voting strength as of December 31, 1980 

PREC DEM 

1 454 

2 472 

3 700 

4 358 

5 611 

6 588 

7 431 

8 376 

9 417 

10 632 

11 451 232 522 1205 

12 545 250 938 1733 
TOTL 6035 2967 9048 18050 



IEP 


IND 


TOTAL 


374 


812 


1640 


188 


513 


1173 


259 


1109 


2068 


83 


287 


728 


384 


1219 


2214 


290 


714 


1592 


193 


610 


1234 


267 


651 


1294 


145 


613 


1175 


302 


1060 


1994 



57 




Carol C. Cleven, Vice-Chairman 
Kenneth C. Taylor, Secretary 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



John W. Peters, Chairman 



Jill Toney, Student Member 
Thomas L. Rivard, Superintendent 

THE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1980 



MyraJ. Silver 
Edward H. Hilliard 



Years 

1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980-81 



:achers 


Non-Teachers' 


Budget 2 


Expenditures 


Enrollment 


553 


331 


11,719,467. 


11,719,112. 


9,555 


565 


336 


12,348,725. 


12,337,877. 


9,311 


550 


298 


13,024,958. 


13,008,530. 


8,936 


539 


273 


13,270,419. 


13,716,642. 


8,395 


526 


273 


14,435,848. 


14,435,510. 


7,940 


513 


261 


15,496,000. 


3 


7,477 



'Includes Part Time Personnel 
includes Federal Funds 
3 Not Finalized until 6/30/81 



Another year has passed, a year of changes and 
preparation for the new challenges of the 1980's. To date 
the greatest single phenomenon affecting policy and 
practices in the Chelmsford Schools is the declining stu- 
dent enrollment. As the year began, the total student 
enrollment was approximately 22% lower than in 1974. 
In 1985 the projected enrollment will be down 44% from 
the 1974 pupil enrollment. Its effect was literally felt in 
all areas of the school system: facilities, personnel, pro- 
gram, budget, collective bargaining, and short and long 
range planning. While the decline itself is known by most 
people, its consequences in terms of grade reorganiza- 
tion, school closings, reduction in force, and program 
change will become far more real to everyone for 1980-81 
is the year for decisions. The School Committee is 
presently studying plans for reorganizing the gradation of 



the school system and the administrative organization. 
Included in this study are specific issues as school con- 
solidation, which schools should close, when they should 
be closed, how many administrators are needed between 
now and the mid-eighties, and how action on these issues 
can best be coordinated. It is anticipated that a majority 
of these issues will be decided by April, 1981. 

Another phenomenon appearing on the school scene is 
Proposition 2V£ which limits the property tax levy to 
2V£% of the true market value of the property in the 
community. This will have a significant impact on the 
school system. Proposition 2^4 notwithstanding, it is the 
School Committee's goal, in face of declining pupil 
enrollment, double-digit inflation and rampant energy 
costs to effect significant budget economies in the 



58 



1981-82 school budget. The School Committee spent a 
great deal of time and effort in trying to deal with the 
issues affecting the budget, such as increases due to infla- 
tion and negotiated salaries. Given these factors, the 
School Committee realizes that the time is fast ap- 
proaching when a school system will no longer be able to 
offer the extensive services it has provided in the past, and 
must seek ways of containing the cost of education to that 
which the community is willing and able to pay. While 
the School Committee's commitment is to provide quality 
and excellence in education for all pupils attending 
Chelmsford Schools, it is also committed to operating 
within extant financial constraints required for the 
preparation of a fiscally responsible budget. Accordingly, 
the School Committee issued carefully prepared guide- 
lines for the preparation of the 1981-82 school budget. 
The budget is contained in the Finance Committee's An- 
nual Report. 

Following the September, 1980, announcement by Dr. 
Thomas L. Rivard, Superintendent of the Chelmsford 
Public Schools since February of 1955, that he would be 
retiring on June 30, 1981, the School Committee 
established criteria by which to evaluate superintendent 
candidates. These criteria were incorporated in a 
brochure about Chelmsford and its schools which was 
sent to individuals and institutions where likely can- 
didates, might be discovered. The School Committee ap- 
pointed a Screening Committee of nine citizens of the 
community to screen out all but five to seven of the ap- 
plicants using the School Committee's criteria. These 
finalists will be interviewed by the School Committee with 
the Superintendent to be appointed by its members by 
April 1, 1981. 



It is impossible to document all of the educational 
highlights of the school year. The Chelmsford Public 
Schools have been responsible to the needs of students 
while being sensitive to community needs and problems. 
Planning teaching strategies and materials to permit 
students to progress according to their needs requires a 
dedicated commitment of effort and time from all. The 
following reports written by school personnel will help 
readers of this report to understand better some of the 
learning experiences their children are having in our 
schools today. 

FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL: 

The quality of education at the High School continues 
to be at a level that the townspeople have come to 
recognize and expect. As in past years, the High School 
student has excelled when measured against peers from 
other communities. This year, for example, there were 
nine National Merit Finalists and twenty-five Letters of 
Commendation. In addition, we were honored to have 
our third Presidential Scholar in the last five years. 

It has become an annual occurrence to cite the many 
awards and honors won by the High School Math Team. 
This year they were Merrimack Valley Conference 
Champs for the eighth consecutive year, the past six 
undefeated, and New England Regional Champions in 
the National Math Contest, finishing fourth nationally. 

The High School Faculty again recognized the outstan- 
ding academic achievements of the students by presen- 
ting plaques to the meritorious students in each subject 
area at the annual Academic Awards Night. 



As a result of declining school population, Westlands 
School B was closed on June 30, 1980, joining previously 
closed East, Qhiessy, Highland and McFarlin A & B 
Schools. Unlike the latter schools, Westlands School B 
was razed to provide greater play area for Westlands A 
School pupils. 

As stated earlier in this report, one or more buildings 
will be closed effective June, 1981, depending upon the 
outcome of the study presently being undertaken by the 
School Committee. 

The School Committee, after reviewing data process- 
ing studies submitted to its members in April 1975, 
February 1978 and February 1979, hired a Director of 
Data Processing effective July 1, 1980. The director has 
complete responsibility for the overall formulation, 
organization, direction, supervision, coordination and 
control in the administration of the Chelmsford Public 
Schools' data processing system under policies and guide- 
lines approved by the School Committee and School 
Superintendent. This includes both educational and ad- 
ministrative data processing. The Director is surveying, 
identifying, cataloging, defining and analyzing all ex- 
isting data processing requirements and will coordinate, 
monitor, supervise and control timely delivery of data 
processing service for all existing and future data process- 
ing requirements of the school system. 



The Drama Club presented two excellent productions 
this year. "Carousel" was performed in the Spring and 
"Mousetrap" was featured in the Fall. The Chejmsford 
Jr.-Sr. High School Symphony Orchestra received a 
Superior rating and second place overall placement in 
class AAAA at the State Band and Orchestra Festival 
sponsored by the Mass. Instrumental Conductors Associa- 
tion. 

In addition, the Orchestra has launched a campaign to 
raise funds for a trip to England. This campaign, known 
as "Britain or Bust" is a vast undertaking and has the sup- 
port of staff, students and parents in planning fund- 
raising ventures to support the trip. The Band par- 
ticipated in its annual Exchange Concert, this year 
travelling to and then hosting the Band from Ossining 
High School in New York. 

The High School is growing as a multi-cultural center 
as once again we were pleased to host two American Field 
Service students, one from Italy and one from Spain. In 
addition, the two students from Peking, China are enjoy- 
ing the benefits of an education at Chelmsford High 
School and several Vietnamese and other Oriental 
students are being exposed to the American way of life. 
They in turn, share their culture and style with their 
Chelmsford peers. 

The newly opened Career Center in the heart of the 
building has had a very positive impact on the entire stu- 



59 



dent body and one only has to pass through to see the 
"'hub-bub" of activity including students, faculty and 
guest speakers from colleges and industry. 

The Career Center also features two job-placement 
counselors, one of whom is sponsored by the Division of 
Employment Security, the other through a federal pro- 
ject, to work with business oriented students not planning 
to attend college. 

The athletic teams represented the school in an ex- 
emplary fashion, whether they won championships or 
not. The Hockey Team won the Merrimack Valley Con- 
ference Championship and advanced to the quarter- 
finals of the State Tournament. The girls Volleyball 
Team also won the Merrimack Valley Championship and 
lost in the Semi-Finals of the State Tournament, finishing 
as the fourth best team in the State. The boys Tennis 
team and Cross-Country team also won Conference 
Championships. The Girls Field Hockey team won the 
Merrimack Valley West Conference Championship, and 
participated in the State Tournament. On Thanksgiving 
Day, the football team, by virtue of its win over tradi- 
tional rival, Billerica, retired the Police Chiefs Trophy 
for the third time. 



ed by: 

1. High student and staff morale. 

2. Over 300 students in musical performing groups. 

3. More than 400 students involved in intramural 
athletics. 

4. Highly successful charity drives for needy members of 
our community. 

5. Active participation in extra-curricula activities. 

6. Excellent achievement test scores as reported by 
S.R.A. exams. 

7. A drop in truancy, smoking and discipline problems. 

8. A highly successful student store. 

9. Periodic informational programs presented to 
parents. 

Three basic advisory committees continue to operate — 
to promote communication between/among all the 
members of the McCarthy Junior High School Communi- 
ty- 

1. Faculty Senate — Teacher and Administrator 

2. McCarthy Advisory Council (MAC) — Parent and 
Teacher 

3. Student Council 



Not only did our teams perform admirably but our stu- 
dent body and fans were honored for the fourth con- 
secutive year by being voted the Nathan W. Aldrich 
Award, symbolic of good sportsmanship and decorum 
during basketball contests. 

Overall, the High School continued to monitor, 
evaluate and adjust programs and policies in order to 
continue to meet and maintain the high standards and 
expectations set by the community. This will be enhanced 
by the onset this year of a complete self-evaluation of 
staff, programs, policies and philosophy in anticipation 
of next years evaluation for accreditation purposes by the 
New England Association of Schools and Colleges. The 
staff, students and community are participating in this 
assessment. 

FROM THE MCCARTHY JR. HIGH SCHOOL 
BUILDING MASTER 

This is the 3rd year of McCarthy Junior High School's 
House plan. The "Red" House includes the reading, 
science, home economics, industrial arts, music, art, 
physical education and special education departments. A 
new program is being explored this year for the seventh 
grade. It is called the "Cluster" and it is also included in 
the "Red" House. The program consists of 110 seventh 
graders with varied abilities who have the same six 
teachers. This program is intended to develop a more ef- 
fective House plan. The "White" House includes the 
foreign language, english, social studies, math and 
library departments located on the second floor. 

As a result of the "House" plan and the "Cluster" a 
closer relationship between administrators, teachers, 
students and parents has developed. We have been suc- 
cessful in assisting students in assuming their respon- 
sibilities and we have made a more concerted effort to 
meet the needs of all our students. This has been evidenc- 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF THE 
PARKER JR. HIGH SCHOOL 

The administration and staff of the Parker Junior High 
School have continued to work together to give the 
students an atmosphere of learning. The curriculum is 
varied and challenging. It prepares students to be respon- 
sible and contributing members of a democratic society. 

Teachers use many different strategies and materials to 
motivate the students. Programs are adjusted to meet in- 
dividual needs. Projects and Field Trips add to the ex- 
periences of the girls and boys. 

Extra-curricular activities are maintained at a high 
level. The Choraliers, the Band, and the Orchestra have 
presented two excellent programs during the school year. 
The members of the Math League have participated in 
several meets and usually have attained a high rating. 
The Ninth Grade Art students have been involved in 
several unusual projects and have produced a most uni- 
que calendar. The Student Council has been active in its 
many social functions. 

Enthusiasm is shown in the many school sport teams, 
namely Football, Field Hockey, Cross Country, Wrestl- 
ing, Basketball, Gymnastics, Baseball, Softball and 
Track. High praise also goes to the Cheerleaders. The 
1980-81 group placed second in the Regional Tourna- 
ment of the National High School Cheerleading Cham- 
pionship. The members of the Booster Club are to be 
thanked for providing the award ceremonies for these 
athletes. 

Each year a student is chosen to receive the Mc- 
Cullough Mathematics Award. This award is presented 
to a student who maintains at least an 85 average in his 
mathematics class, shows good academic achievement in 
his other classes, indicates good leadership qualities and 



60 



has the ability to get along well with both faculty and 
students. The student should have an appreciation of 
mathematics which is indicated both by classroom perfor- 
mance and participation in the extra curricular mathe- 
matics program. 

The Science Fair is an annual event. Students are 
chosen from their seventh, eighth, and ninth grade 
classes. They are judged on their visual display and their 
verbal presentation. Projects are divided into two 
categories: Experimental or Research. Winners are 
selected in each grade and each category. 



The Guidance Counselors work with the students to 
help them do a better job in school and to help solve pro- 
blems that may face them in their daily lives. MOIS, the 
New England Occupational/Career Information System, 
has been placed in the school library. The students are 
taught how to use the computer to gain information 
about careers and occupations. 

The music department was pleased to announce that 
eleven students were selected to be a part of the Nor- 
theastern Junior District Concert, which was held in 
Salem. There were two in the Boy's Chorus, two in the 
Girl's Chorus, two in the Band and five in the Orchestra. 
A Parker Violinist was the Concert Mistress. 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
THE SOUTH ROW SCHOOL 

It might be of some interest to townspeople to reflect 
briefly on South Row School's past inasmuch as its future 
is in doubt as a result of a decline in enrollment and Pro- 
position 2'/£- The school first opened its doors on Mon- 
day, January 14, 1963, receiving 750 students and giving 
much relief to the then bulging school system. 

During the following years through 1972 the school 
housed as many as 800 students and consistently housed 
over 700 students. The gymnasium was used for 
classroom space for the school years 1964-65 through 
1972-73. The library was finally moved from a corridor 
area into a classroom space in the 1974-75 school 
year — the same year in which the kindergarten program 
began. At the present time, the school houses just over 
540 students. 



The school is organized as a modified self contained 
school. Each child has the opportunity to identify strong- 
ly with one adult and his peers in such a setting. The staff 
provides many opportunities for creative experience in 
addition to skill development. The staff recognizes each 
individual's work and knows that a feeling of success is 
essential for growth. 

Teachers at South Row are acutely aware of the variety 
of individual needs of students. South Row School is uni- 
que in that it services the needs of special children 
throughout the town with its three special needs class- 
rooms and with its programs for integrating students with 
special needs. 

The staff believes that the most comprehensive goal of 
education is to help people become self-directed persons 
capable of achieving personal goals while also serving the 
good of society. 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF GUIDANCE 

The following are the pertinent facts and figures for 
the Class of 1980; also included are Chelmsford High 
School and Nashoba Tech statistics for an overview of 
Chelmsford public school graduates: 



Number of graduating students 

Four-year colleges 

Two-year colleges 

Tech specialized, plus business 

Total Post -Secondary 

Employment 

Undecided 

Military 

Marriage 



1977 



1978 



1979 



1980 



609 




685 




611 




630 




308 


50.6% 


375 


54.7% 


351 


57.5% 


366 


58.1% 


93 


15.2% 


79 


11.5% 


69 


11.3% 


55 


8.7% 


38 


6.2% 


30 


4.3% 


32 


5.2% 


24 


3.8% 


439 


72% 


484 


70.6% 


452 


74% 


445 


70.6% 


151 


24.6% 


178 


26% 


139 


22.7% 


142 


22.5% 


7 


1.6% 


11 


1.6% 


3 


.4% 


25 


3.9% 


10 


1.5% 


12 


1.7% 


16 


2.6% 


13 


2.1% 


2 


.03% 






1 




5 


.07% 



61 



Highlights: 

70.6% of the graduates plan to continue their educa- 
tion beyond high school. 

58.1% of the graduates plan to attend 4 year colleges. 

There were 3 students in the top 65 who opted to seek 
employment before attending college. 

56.9% of the top 65 plan to enter science/math related 
fields. 

Transcripts processed totaled 2,769; this included 500 
past graduates. The average number processed for the 
graduating class was 5.1. 

Nineteen boys and 10 girls dropped out during the 
school year. Additionally, 27 did not graduate for 
academic reasons. Of this latter group, 9 have successful- 
ly completed summer school and have been awarded 
their diplomas. 

Advanced Placement scores included 19 with 3; 14 
with 4; 15 with 5 (perfect score) for a total of 47 our of 55 
scores with college level grades. (See Advanced Place- 
ment summary which follows in this report.) 



TOP SIXTY-FIVE STUDENTS- 

(Top 10%) 



-CLASS OF 1980 



M.I.T. 


Chemical Engineering 


M.I.T. 


Chemical Engineering 


Northwestern 


Journalism 


M.I.T. 


Chemical Engineering 


Cornell 


Biochemistry 


Cornell 


Economics 


McGill 


Biology 


Boston University 


Biology 


Tufts 


Education or Math 


Bates 


Pre-Med 


Bates 


Undecided 


Amherst 


Economics 


Rensselaer Polytech Institute 


Business Administration 


Harvard 


Biology 


Harvard 


Math/Computer Science 


Yale 


Pre-Law 


Wellesley 


Math or Economics 


Case Western Reserve 


Biology/Pre-Dental 


U. of Lowell 


Electrical Engineering 


Colgate 


Biology 


Tufts 


Chemistry 


Bates 


Psychology 


Holy Cross 


Economics 


Smith 


Math 


Boston College 


Accounting 


Rensselaer Polytech Institute 


Engineering 


Hartwick 


Nursing 


Bates 


Biology 


U. of Richmond 


Biology 


U. of Vermont 


Physical Therapy 


Smith 


Engineering 


Southeastern Mass. U. 


Math 


A.F.S. Student — Another year to 


complete in Switzerland 


U. of Vermont 


Liberal Arts 


Tufts 


Engineering 


Eisenhower College 


Pre-Med 


Brigham Young 


Chemical Engineering 


William & Mary 


Pre-Law 


Columbia 


Plasma Physics 


U. of Lowell 


Engineering 


Wesleyan 


Music 


U. of Lowell 


Environmental Science 


Holy Cross 


Political Science 


Case Western Reserve 


Biology 


Work 




Earlham College 


American Studies 


Smith 


Math/Liberal Arts 



Syracuse University 


Bioengi nee ring 


Work 




Rensselaer Polytech Institute 


Engineering 


U. of Lowell 


Elementary Education 


Wheaton 


Undecided 


Villanova 


Commerce 8c Finance 


Work 




U. of Mass. 


Art 


U. of New Hampshire 


Biology 


Worcester Polytechnic Institute 


Computer Engineering 


U. of Lowell 


Art 


A.F.S. Student 




U. of Lowell 


Nursing 


Hamilton 


Political Science 


U. of Mass. (Amherst) 


Business Administratiot 


Boston College 


Biology 


Oral Roberts University 


Nursing 


Boston University 


Communications 



TOP SIXTY-FIVE STUDENTS 

Amherst College 

Bates College 

Boston College 

Boston University 

Brigham Young University 

Case Western Reserve University 

Colgate University 

Columbia University 

Cornell University 

Earlham College 

Eisenhower College 

Hamilton College 

Harvard University 

Hartwick College 

College of the Holy Cross 

University of Lowell 

Mass. Institute of Technology 

University of Massachusetts 

McGill University 

University of New Hampshire 

Northwestern University 

Oral Roberts University 

Rensselaer Polytech Institute 

University of Richmond 

Southeastern Mass. University 

Smith College 

Syracuse University 

Tufts University 

University of Vermont 

Villanova University 

Wellesley College 

Wesleyan University 

Wheaton College 

College of William & Mary 

Worcester Polytech Institute 

Yale University 

A.F.S. Students 

Employment 

SUMMARY OF CAREER PLANS 
TOP 65 STUDENTS 

Accounting 

American Studies 

Art 

Biochemistry 

Bioengineering 

Biology 

Biology/ Pre Dental 



62 



Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Commerce & Finance 

Communications 

Economics 

Elem. Education 

Education/Math 

Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering/Comp. Science 

Computer Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 
Environmental Science 
Journalism 
Liberal Arts 
Math 

Math/Computer Science 
M at h/ Economics 
Math/ Liberal Arts 
Music 
Nursing 

Political Science 
Physical Therapy 
Plasma Physics 
Pre- Med 
Pre-Law 
Psychology 
Employment 
Undecided 
2 AFS Students 



ADVANCED PLACEMENT TESTING RESULTS 

School Year 1979-80 (May, 1980) 

37 candidates took 55 exams — Summary of results is as 
follows: 



usually granted for 3's and higher; occasionally, 2's 
receive credit. According to College Board, AP grades 
are equivalent to college grades as follows: 4-5 = A's or 
4.0; 3=B or 3.0. 



Chelmsford High Scores: 



Score Range 



High 



Total 
Scores 



*American History 
*Chemistry 

English Lang. & Comp. 
*English Comp/Lit. 
*French Language 
•Calculus AB 










3 
1 



3 


•Calculus BC 





1 


•Spanish Language 
TOTALS 







8 




47 ou 


tof 55 




with 3 


>r bette 



*AP Courses Offered 1979-80 

ALL CHELMSFORD PUBLIC SECONDARY 

STUDENTS, CHELMSFORD HIGH 

& NASHOBA TECH 



Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba Tech (Chelmsford Srs.) 


Total Post- 
Secondary 

445 
1 


Total 
Others 

185 = 
69 


(employment, 

military, etc.) 

630 

70 




446 


254 


700 


Percentages 

Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba Tech (Chelmsford Srs.) 


70.6% 
1.4% 


29.4% 
98.6% 





Combined — 64% 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OR CAREER EDUCATION 



Colleces Receiving A/P Scores (35) 

Cornell University 

University of Lowell 

George Washington University 

Villanova University 

University of Mass. (Amherst) 

Colgate University 

Boston University 

Hamilton College 

College of William & Mary 

Yale University 

Mass. Institute of Technology 

Bates College 

Smith College 

Case Western Reserve University 

Bradford College 

University of Florida 

Wellesley College 

Columbia University 

Boston College 

Syracuse University 

Tufts University /Jackson College 

Brigham Young University 

Northwestern University 



No. of 
Reports 

2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 



Scores are reported on a scale of 1-5, with 5 being the 
highest. Depending on the college and program, credit is 



With the announcement of Dr. Rivard's retirement, ef- 
fective June 30, 1981, this will be the last opportunity I 
will have to write an Annual Report under his leadership. 

I would like to express to the citizens of Chelmsford the 
pleasure I have had serving your sons and daughters 
under the educational leadership of Dr. Rivard. You are, 
I believe, seeing the end of an educational era. Dr. 
Rivard has had much empathy for the student of occupa- 
tional or technical education. This concern has been ex- 
pressed and shown by not only his commitment to the 
comprehensive high school curriculum, but also by his 
commitment to your other high school... Nashoba Voca- 
tional Technical High School. Dr. Rivard has had con- 
cern for all levels of students, whether they were gifted, 
talented, or like most of us, just average. 

The success of the programs I have had the privilege to 
head for the past twenty- two years was directly propor- 
tional to the support Dr. Rivard has given to these pro- 
grams. 

The Home Economics and Industrial Arts Depart- 
ments which are part of the Career Education Depart- 
ment have introduced a new co-educational curriculum. 
The planning of this program was announced in the last 
Annual Town Report. This program is a mandated 
course by vote of the School Committee for all girls and 
boys in the 7th and 8th grades. 



63 



The citizens of the community are encouraged to visit 
the Home Economics/ Industrial Arts Programs to per- 
sonally view these programs. The thrust of the program is 
to attempt to break down some of the sex stereotyping the 
students have been subjected to. The latest report from 
the State Division of Employment states 64% of the 
mothers now hold full or part time employment outside 
of the home. Of course, they also still have major respon- 
sibilities within the home. With these new emerging 
social/work necessities, it is important that both the male 
and female understand the household tasks each must 
assume. This is only one example of the sex-role stereo- 
typing the new Home Economics/Industrial Arts cur- 
riculum is addressing. 

The Distributive Education program is still experienc- 
ing good student enrollment. This program gives the 
students an opportunity to have practical work ex- 
perience in local retail businesses. These students take a 
regular educational program plus one period of Distri- 
butive Education each day. Students are then released 
from school for practical experiences in local businesses. 

Local business people who would like to participate in 
this cooperative Distributive Education Program are urg- 
ed to call the principal of the high school. For the past 
two years the Federal Government has allowed a tax ad- 
vantage to employers of the D.E. students. This tax in- 
centive allows employers to deduct all salaries paid the 
students from the business' federal tax obligations. 

Programs in the Business Education Department that 
are functioning as the result of Federal Project writing 
are producing the expected outcomes. Partly because of 
these successes, the Business Education teachers will con- 
tinue to write for federal funding. 

The Business Education Department is still experienc- 
ing an increase in student enrollments. Students with the 
guidance of their parents, guidance counselors, and 
teachers are realizing the importance of backing a strong 
academic study program with some business skills. 

In a recent survey of one hundred and five colleges and 
universities conducted for the Massachusetts Business Ed- 
ucation Director's Association by the Director of Career 
Education, it was related to the organization that many 
of the schools feel some Business Education subjects 
should be part of a high school graduate's program. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Last May all Grade 9 students who began the study of 
French in Grade 7 took a nationally-standardized norm- 
referenced test in French. The participating students 
were in their 3rd year of exposure to new French cur- 
riculum materials. The results were highly gratifying in- 
asmuch as scores improved an average of 20 points in all 
language skills over the previous battery administered in 
1977. It would appear that the new program is achieving 
what it purports to do. 

At the high school level, enrollments in foreign 
languages continue to hold to previous levels at 55% of 



the entire student population. Latin is becoming an in- 
creasingly popular option with enrollments up 30% in 
Latin I over the previous year. Two factors apparently 
contribute to this phenomenon: 

1 . The appeal of the new curriculum materials which 
are less academic and more culturally-oriented than 
traditional programs. 

2. The back-to-basics movement helps enrollments in 
any subject area which develops English language 
skills, specifically vocabulary and sentence structure. 

The Council for International Educational Exchange 
confirmed that CHS link with Instituto Juan XXIII in 
Valencia, Venezuela. The first phase of the exchange 
with this school occurred in October, 1980, when seven 
students visited CHS for 3 weeks. The partner school will 
reciprocate in February, 1981, when ten CHS students 
will travel to Venezuela. The exchange was very suc- 
cessful in both the affective and academic domains, and 
the department plans to maintain the program for the 
future. 

The department took steps to increase its visibility in 
the community by organizing an International Festival 
last spring. The activity included static cultural displays, 
international foods, and a variety of acts by foreign 
language students. The response from the community 
was overwhelming. The positive reception assures the 
continuation of the event for the future. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF HEALTH 
EDUCATION, SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 

The science program in the Chelmsford Public Schools 
is a blend of a traditional program with a hands-on ex- 
perimental program. The overall program is designed to 
produce a greater understanding of the interdependence 
of individuals on each other and their role in society. 

The elementary science program is presently being 
changed from a totally material-centered laboratory ap- 
proach to one which incorporates a body of factual 
knowledge as well as laboratory oriented experiences. 
The core of the program at each grade level is two units 
in life, earth, and physical science. The scope of the pro- 
gram allows the students to sample a variety of content in 
all domains of science. As the students achieve higher 
grade levels the topics are reintroduced enabling the 
students to study each topic in greater depth. 

At the junior high level we have started to phase out 
the ISCS program. Over a two year period, we will move 
to a sequence which teaches life, earth, and physical 
science in the 7th, 8th, and 9th grades. These courses will 
be a natural extension of the new elementary program. 

The senior high level science program continues to be 
heavily enrolled by the Chelmsford students. The con- 
straints of time and room useage have necessitated a 
restructuring of our level II biology program. The pro- 
grams in clinical techniques and advanced chemistry con- 
tinue to be refined and improved each year. Currently we 
have begun planning for an advanced placement pro- 
gram in biology. 



64 



Health Education continues to be a fundamental seg- 
ment of the student's program at all levels. The elemen- 
tary program is supplemented with programs sponsored 
by the local Jay-cee women. At the elementary level, the 
health education in many classrooms is integrated with 
the study of science. The junior high program has a new 
component in Health Education at the 9th grade level. 
This new component emphasizes training in CPR and 
First Aid as well as Family and Peer Relationships and 
Sexuality. The high school Health Education program is 
currently being changed to address a national as well as a 
local problem. A unit is being developed in alcohol 
education which will be used at the ninth grade level. As 
the school system is reorganized, changes in curriculum 
will occur that necessitate our attention as to curriculum 
such as Health Education can be fully integrated at all 
levels. 

The mathematics program in the Chelmsford School 
System continues to attempt to develop the creativity and 
competence of all students in the application of mathe- 
matical knowledge. Emphasis is placed on mathematical 
computations and problem solving skills. Problem solving 
activities provide an opportunity to apply skills using con- 
tent and knowledge from other academic areas. At the 
elementary level students receive instruction in metric 
skills, as well as mathematics concepts. At the secondary 
level the curriculum has undergone some change due to 
the current reorganization process. Pre-Algebra and 
Algebra I have been replaced by Algebra I, Part I and 
Algebra I, Part II for some students. The addition of 
microcomputers to our mathematics laboratory has in- 
creased enrollment in the computer course. The heavy 
enrollment and increased useage by students indicates a 
need for a Level II course in programming. The 
mathematics curriculum must continually address the 
need to prepare students with the concepts and tools to 
function in a mathematical society as well as the 
theoretical basis to continue the study of pure mathe- 
matics. 



FROM THE COORDINATOR 
OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

The past year has proved an especially stimulating one 
in social studies. In concluding out Colonial Family of 
New England unit in second grade, children not only 
completed field study at the Garrison House and 1803 
School House but also enjoyed school visits by "Roving 
Pilgrims" from Plimoth Plantation. 

Our fourth grade economics unit has been updated to 
reflect new materials and economic issues for the 1980's. 
Of particular assistance in this updating have been the 
resources of the Joint Council on Economic Education 
and the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. We hope to up- 
date our fourth grade India unit in the near future. 

Revision of the fifth grade social studies curriculum 
nears completion. This three year project has involved 
many teachers, students and the curriculum resources of 
Old Sturbridge Village, the Lowell Museum and the 
Lowell National Park. Our purpose has been to introduce 
children to the early history of our country, focusing 
upon Sturbridge as an early nineteenth century village in 



transition from farm to factory and upon Lowell as 
observed by its workers. 

Using resources of Boston University's African Studies 
Center as well as our own expertise, our sixth grade 
Africa unit has been updated. This completes planned 
revisions of the China, Middle East and Africa area 
studies units in grade six. 

Junior High social studies units are largely updated. 
We have provided some additional opportunities for 
grade seven students to apply map and globe skills to 
"real world" global issues of food, water, energy and 
population. Field testing of a holocaust unit in grade nine 
continues and will be formally evaluated in the spring. 

High school staff are presently engaged in evaluating 
the entire school as part of the process of reaccreditation. 
Social studies teachers not only evaluate the social studies 
program, but become actively involved in the total 
school's evaluation experience. We assess past practices; 
examine present curricula; recommend future directions. 
This formal process complements continuous evaluation 
in social studies at all levels. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
LANGUAGE ARTS/READING 

During the past year, three areas of the language arts/ 
reading curriculum were addressed — competency testing, 
listening skills, and the junior high school reading pro- 
gram. 

Competency Testing 

The School Committee and the Commissioner of Edu- 
cation approved the recommendations of the Superinten- 
dent's Task Force for the development and implementa- 
tion of Chelmsford's Basic Skills Program in curriculum, 
testing, and follow-up instruction. Task Force members 
include representatives from the general public as well as 
from the school department. A detailed description of 
Chelmsford's plan for Basic Skills Improvement and 
Competency Testing is available in all school and public 
libraries. 

An interesting aspect of competency testing is the re- 
quirement to test a student's writing ability through a 
writing sample. Each sample is scored by two professional 
staff members trained in holistic scoring. Holistic scoring 
means judging a writing sample for its total effect in 
terms of content and manner of expression. Secondary 
students who fail the test are provided with a follow-up 
instructional program and are required to take the test 
again the following year. Meetings to discuss competency 
testing are held at various times throughout the school 
year and are open to the public. 

Listening Skills 

Chelmsford's system-wide Listening Skills Committee 
consists of teachers, specialists, and administrators who 
have been working with outside consultants funded by a 
Title II Commonwealth In-Service Institute Grant. A 
series of bi-monthly meetings has been scheduled to 
discuss the nature and scope of listening skills, to develop 
a listening skills curriculum, to determine appropriate in- 
struments for testing listening skills, and to address ways 



65 



of dealing with students who are deficient in listening 
skills. In accordance with the state mandate for Basic 
Skills Improvement, Chelmsford must submit plans for a 
listening skills program, to the Department of Education 
by August 1 , 1981 . The plans will follow the same format 
as those submitted last year in reading, writing, and 
mathematics. 

Reading Program 

Junior high school reading specialists, two elementary 
reading specialists, and a sixth grade teacher participated 
in a workshop last summer for revising the junior high 
school reading program. Each of the three reading levels 
— remedial, developmental, and enrichment — has been 
revised according to objectives, classroom management 
techniques, criteria for placement, assessment in- 
struments, and materials used. 

The remedial or corrective reading program stresses 
functional literacy and survival skills. Skills emphasized 
include recalling details, understanding sequence, 
locating information, and following directions. For ap- 
proximately fifty percent of the classroom time, students 
work on individualized materials under teacher direction. 
Students who read below grade level and need continuous 
teacher direction and support to function effectively in 
the classroom are placed in this program. 

The developmental reading program emphasizes the 
application of basic reading skills like context clues, in- 
ferences, note-taking, and outlining in all subject areas. 
During most of the classroom time, students work in 
either small groups of as a whole class. Students in this 
program are reading within the average range of reading 
ability, but demonstrate weaknesses in specific reading 
skills as opposed to weaknesses in general reading ability. 

The enrichment reading program focuses on the devel- 
opment of skills necessary for advanced high school and 
college course work. Students learn test-taking, note- 
taking, and outlining skills and how to use these skills to 
improve their study habits. The improvement of reading 
rate and the development of reading flexibility are also 
stressed. 

All students in the reading program regardless of their 
level of achievement are tested at the beginning and end 
of the school year, using one of three tests: the Stanford 
Diagnostic Test, the Metropolitan Achievement Test, or 
the Iowa Silent Reading Test. The test results are record- 
ed in the student's Reading Profile Folder. The Reading 
Profile Folder also includes other pertinent information 
relative to the student's growth in reading. 

Chelmsford's professional staff has played a vital role in 
developing all aspects of the language arts/reading pro- 
gram. Teachers and administrators have participated in 
curriculum workshops and in-service programs and have 
served on task force committees responsible for generat- 
ing objectives, designing tests and developing materials. 
The work of the professional staff is indeed living testi- 
mony of Chelmsford's commitment to curriculum as a 
human, dynamic, on-going process. 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

One of the most important functions of the school 
library has always been to develop sound research skills 
and to encourage an appreciation and enjoyment of 
reading. 

Communications skills, including reading, continue to 
be a necessary base for effective learning. But, as society 
becomes increasingly complex and the issues more com- 
plicated, the libraries' role must expand to meet the more 
varied and sophisticated information needs of its users. 

Toward this end, the Chelmsford school libraries pro- 
vide a wide variety of information resources including fic- 
tion, non-fiction, paperbacks, reference books and 
periodicals. Through formal library instruction at the 
elementary level and through group and individual in- 
struction continuing at the secondary level, students are 
taught to utilize these information tools in a systematic 
way for study and research, and are encouraged to ex- 
plore them for personal enrichment. Coping with change 
and solving problems involves consideration and analysis 
of a number of alternatives. By introducing students to 
diverse information sources and by encouraging them to 
evaluate both print and nonprint materials, the school 
libraries play a critical role in the basic educational pro- 
cess. 

At the elementary level, the basic activity remained 
helping students locate and evaluate the most ap- 
propriate available material, both through class instruc- 
tion and individual guidance. Each and every elementary 
library was the scene of heavy use. Classes came in for 
reference and research, they came for formal instruction 
in library usage, and the students checked out materials 
for curriculum-related study and recreational reading. 
Some of the most popular programs in which the students 
were involved were chess tournaments, favorite book con- 
tests and the "question of the week'' program. 

The elementary library assistants attended five work- 
shops designed to increase their skills in teaching and 
communicating. Among these were a session with the 
reading specialists in which they were informed of services 
and materials the libraries could supply, a meeting with 
the junior high school librarians to improve coordination 
between the two levels, and another in which strategies 
were planned to achieve consistency in library proce- 
dures. 

The elementary library instruction program was re- 
warding. During the first month of the 1980-1981 school 
year, the sixth grade students were given an SRA test 
which contained a section on reference skills. They were 
found to be performing at the seventh grade, ninth 
month level. 

Orientation sessions were held at each of the two junior 
high schools for each seventh grade. The sixth grade 
students housed at the Parker Junior High School made 
weekly visits to the library and received formal instruction 
in library science. The special needs students at both 
schools made frequent use of the collections. Both 
libraries were heavily used by classes doing research in 
many subject areas. 



66 



The Instructional Media Center at the High School was 
extrenely busy; in a typical one-month period, over forty- 
five classes came to do research with library materials. 
Fifteen sophomore classes had orientation, with other 
classes coming later in the semester for tours, including 
special needs students. Twelve student assistants elected 
to earn work-study credit by learning about library ser- 
vices and procedures. 

One of the purposes of the Instructional Media Center 
is to provide equipment and material for use in creating 
audio and visual aids. Although the Graphic Artist is 
located at the High School, his services were available on 
a system-wide basis. These services included the prepara- 
tion of overhead transparencies, slide/tape programs, 
graphic design and photography. 

Headquarters for the audio visual technician is at the 
McCarthy Junior High School. He continued to repair 
and maintain equipment in all schools. During the sum- 



mer months he systematically inspected, cleaned, and 
where necessary, effected repairs on every item of equip- 
ment in the school system. 

During this past year the High School television studio 
began producing a live morning news show during the 
homeroom period each day. Student volunteers did 
porta-pack taping of special events at the High School 
and other schools in the system. One thousand sixteen 
hundred and fourteen hours of videotaped programming 
was broadcast via closed-circuit within the High School; 
several more hours were used in the junior highs and 
elementary schools. Eighty two titles were added to the 
videotape library. 

Because of the libraries' commitment to centralization, 
library materials were received in each facility fully 
cataloged, processed, and ready for use. Audio visual 
software — filmstrips, sound filmstrips, 16mm films and 
recordings were sent to various schools upon request from 
the collection housed in the Instructional Media Center. 



CHELMSFORD LIBRARY STATISTICS 









79-80 






9-15-80 


1979-80 


Number of 


Books per 




Students 


Circulation 


Books 


Student 


BYAM 


647 


23,591 


10,084 


15.59 


CENTER 


556 


19,240 


8,598 


15.46 


HARRINGTON 


646 


17,900 


12,391 


19.18 


NORTH 


543 


22,146 


9,196 


16.94 


SOUTH ROW 


542 


17,041 


9,367 


17.28 


WESTLANDS 


482 


18,653 


10,099 


20.95 


McCarthy 


1009 


9,953 


16,433 


16.29 


PARKER 


967 


16,360 


13,775 


14.25 


HIGH SCHOOL 


2084 


9,354 
154,238 


26,853 
116,796 


12.89 


TOTAL 


7476 





FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF ART 

This has been a very productive year for the Art 
Department. Every new year brings students with new 
awareness, better skills, greater talents, and broader 
understanding. The Art Department serves all of the 
schools, and at every grade level the concerns are directly 
related to the growth and development of the child. 

The curriculum is used as a guide to assure that the 
basic objectives are applied equally in every classroom. 
The emphasis at the primary level is to guide children in 
the visual, manipulative, and coordinative skills. The 
direction of these skills is always pacing the growth and 
the needs of the child; and in so doing, we are able to 
develop and accent many areas which are critical in 
transferred application in such areas as Reading and 
Math. 

The upper elementary grades have additional goals. At 
these levels, the Art Specialist is developing more specific 
skills dealing with such areas as color, perspective, and 



the basic rules of design. The visual and discriminatory 
skills are constantly being challenged. In every Elemen- 
tary school, there are many varied and unusual Art ac- 
tivities going on. Many of them are geared to supplement 
and enrich other academic areas and to give new mean- 
ing and greater understanding of the total school cur- 
riculum. 

At both Junior High Schools, we have dynamic pro- 
grams going on. At this level, we offer a broad range of 
experiences to the student in order to make him more 
aware of himself, his ideas, his talents, and his world. 
The ninth grade program is growing in size with every 
year. This is a very positive indication of the interest and 
concern of our students. This program parallels the first 
year art course at the High School. 

At the High School, we have a consolidated program 
which gives every student in the first two years a varied 
tour of the many ways of working and expressing an idea 
in various forms... such as in clay, weaving, painting, 
sculpture, or graphics. This program has been developed 



67 



to encourage students to develop an idea and then to 
repeat it in varied media. The third and fourth year of 
the program is spent developing special skills and needs 
for each student on an individual basis. Many of these 
students will go on to Art schools and colleges, and much 
of their work is directed towards a presentation portfolio. 

Perhaps the most important role that the Art Depart- 
ment plays within the scope of the educational world is 
that this is the one area in all of our schools where 
students are encouraged to be innovative, to experiment, 
to work on their ideas, and to express their thoughts. We 
hope that through our department students will find that 
a spark of an idea can indeed come to life and to exist 
visually. It is our job to ensure "creative" citizens that will 
work to make their world better... this was our goal, and 
this will continue to be our goal. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 

The purpose of music education in the public schools 
of Chelmsford is to assist students to appreciate, under- 
stand, participate, and respond with sensitivity to the 
aesthetic effect of music, according to their individual 
capacities. 

The Music Department is committed to excellence in 
music at all levels and strives to help students discover 
and develop their musical talents for better under- 
standing and enjoyment of all kinds of music. 

Each elementary school has a resident music specialist 
who is responsible for all music education in the building, 
with the exception of instruction on band and orchestral 
instruments. Each school has weekly lessons in music 
along with a performing choral group. All schools have 
song flute ensembles and/or recorder consorts. Some 
schools have guitar clubs, dance groups, or Orff bands. 

Our curriculum guide is based on the conceptual ap- 
proach. We have a spiral curriculum that begins in 
kindergarten and continues through junior high school. 

General music in the junior high school is required of 
all seventh and eighth graders, and is available to ninth 
graders on an elective basis. General music in seven and 
eight is basically designed for non-performing students 
and, for many, it is their last formal contact with school 
music. Choral groups are available on an elective basis to 
all junior high students. 

The high school has course offerings for both perform- 
ing and non-performing students. A staff of two and one- 
third instructors offer courses in music appreciation, 
theory, guitar class, small and large vocal and instrumen- 
tal ensembles, instrumental instruction, and practice 
rooms for individual study. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an ex- 
perience not found in other areas within the Music 
Department. Orchestral string instruments are offered 
starting in Grade 3, while all band and orchestral in- 
struments are included from Grades 4 through 12. Every 
interested student has an opportunity to participate in 
small-group instruction during school time, and 
ensembles during school time, or after school as part of 



the extra-curricular program. We have seen a declining 
student population with an increasing number of in- 
strumental students — from 362 in June of 1971 to over 
1000 as of January, 1981. 

Instrumental and choral ensembles participate in 
school and community concerts and programs through- 
out the school year. Junior high and high school students 
participate in district and state festivals and competi- 
tions. 

The Chelmsford Friends of Music continued to support 
the music programs in all schools, and have contributed a 
great deal of support to scholarships, the private lesson 
program, exchange concerts, and trips. Their purpose is 
to create interest in and to give moral and financial sup- 
port to the music program, and each year their goals 
become more evident. 

The Chelmsford Junior-Senior High School Symphony 
Orchestra has been invited to participate in the Inter- 
national Youth Music Festival in Harrogate, England, 
during the April vacation. While there, they plan to also 
perform in London, Chelmsford (U.K.), and Scotland. 
The Chelmsford Friends of Music, with the orchestra 
students, have adopted the slogan "BRITAIN OR 
BUST." Fund-raising activities, contributions, and 
pledges began last June and will continue through April 
to make this trip possible. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

Physical Education: 

All students in the Chelmsford schools are scheduled 
for Physical Education twice a week. During their 
scheduled classes, they are exposed to a variety of ac- 
tivities that stress physical fitness, fundamental motor 
and activity skills, individual and team sports, and life- 
time sports at the secondary level. 

We also stress the development of self-worth and self- 
esteem, the ability to relate to others and to interact with 
others in a team situation. Our Project Adventure ac- 
tivities also give the students an opportunity to have self- 
testing and trust experiences. 

This year we have had several in-service workshops 
stressing many of the above activities. Our Presidential 
Fitness Awards have been another means of motivation 
towards fitness in our program. 

We now have a full-time adaptive physical education 
instructor. This year we are offering a limited physical 
therapy class for students at the high school level. 

Finally, we have snow and our Cross Country Skiing 
program at the high school is under way. 

Athletics: 

This has been an outstanding year for us in Chelms- 
ford. We have 24 varsity programs at the high school and 
ten programs at each junior high school. A recent study 
of the graduating class of 1980 shows that 40% of the 
class participated in one or more athletic programs. 



68 



We are fortunate to have many fine athletes being 
coached by outstanding people. The following teams won 
Merrimack Valley Conference Championships: Ice 
Hockey, Field Hockey (the first MVC Championship 
ever), Boys' Tennis, Volleyball (two in a row), and Boys' 
Cross Country. 

The number of athletic scholarships earned by our 
boys and girls has increased steadily for the past five 
years. Also this year, we had a Coaches' Handbook 
published that establishes the standards and policies of 
the Chelmsford Athletic Program. 

The new Chelmsford High School stadium opened in 
September to allow us to have contests in Field Hockey, 
Soccer, and Football. We continued our Thanksgiving 
tradition by beating Billerica for the fifth year in a row. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF TITLE I PROGRAM 

Title One is enjoying an outstanding beginning of its 
sixth year at the North School and Westlands School for 
children in grades one through five. 

Concentrating, as ever, in the areas of Reading and 
Mathematics and stressing the basic skills which are 
deemed so important by educators, we have augmented 
our program through the use of computer terminals at 
the Westlands School and by individualizing computers 
at the North School. We are in our second full year of the 
use of these added tools of learning which have proven to 
be very popular to all concerned and have produced great 
results as measured last year. 

Our specific goals which remain the same, we feel, are 
worth repeating, they are as follows: 

1. To produce a measurable effect on pupil growth in 
Reading and/or Mathematics. 

2. To diagnose, design, and implement individualized 
instruction utilizing Pre-Post testing used only in this 
program and the use of multi-media materials. 

3. To improve self-image and build confidence in 
children. 

4. To provide reinforcement and feedback to each stu- 
dent and appropriate Personnel and Parents so that 
they are aware of successes rather than failures. 

5. At the request of the P.A.C. leaders and member- 
ship, a new goal stressing better communication 
enlightening all Parents and interested supporters on 
the achivements of the program as a whole, as well 
as, the individual, through the monthly Newsletter, 
the individualized handbook, personal telephone 
calls, and written correspondence when required will 
be attempted to be improved each year. 

We wish to have all understand that a child's participa- 
tion in this Project does not mean that a student is not 
capable but just that he/she is for one of many reasons 
not at the present working or perhaps has not in the past 
worked to one's potential. Our small group instruction in 



the past has corrected over 90% of this problem along 
with the cooperation of all concerned naturally. 

The administration is overly pleased with the large in- 
crease in P.A.C. Parental participation at our monthly 
meetings this year. P.A.C. being a mandated part of Ti- 
tle I, this is very rewarding. Perhaps our change of format 
has added interest. The Director has arranged an agenda 
for the year with each meeting involving either an in- 
structor speaking on educational topics or Parental par- 
ticipation which should aid the Parents in helping at 
home. High attendance brings new ideas to the group 
which have been greatly received and certainly beneficial 
to all. 

Continuity between the educator and the Parent in to- 
day's society is a must to improve a child's learning. The 
blending of the two for the good of one is our main goal. 
We hope this increased attendance will continue as we 
feel the Program is both beneficial and rewarding to 
specific children. 

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Since September 1974, the Special Education Depart- 
ment has implemented Chapter 766, the Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Special Education Law of 1972. In 
September 1978, P.L. 94-142, the Education of Handi- 
capped Children Act became effective. Both laws entitle 
special needs students to the right of a free and ap- 
propriate education. Students ages three through twenty- 
one years who have had a team evaluation and have not 
received a high school diploma (or its equivalent), and for 
whom it has been determined by the evaluation team to 
have a special need, are eligible for special education ser- 
vices. 

The Chelmsford Special Education Department began 
the September, 1980 school year with 637 students 
registered to receive special education services. This 
represents 8.5 percent of Chelmsford's total school enroll- 
ment. 

Chelmsford has a comprehensive special education 
program to serve the special needs of children in our com- 
munity. To develop and implement the individualized 
educational plans, the staff includes specialists in the 
areas of learning disabilities, speech pathology, adaptive 
physical education, occupational therapy, visual impair- 
ment, hearing impairment, psychological services, social 
services, and vocational services. To serve the needs of 
students who require more specialized educational pro- 
grams, there are thirteen resource classes staffed by 
special education teachers who are assisted by instruc- 
tional aides. 

The Merrimack Special Education Collaborative, in 
which Chelmsford participates, continues to provide ef- 
fective and cost-efficient programs for children with low 
incidence disabilities. Classes are located in the towns of 
Dracut and Billerica and serve the needs of children from 
Chelmsford, Billerica, Dracut, Tewksbury and Westford. 



69 



For the current school year, the Chelmsford Public 
Schools received $148,127 in Federal and State funds to 
maintain current program levels, expand vocational 
education programs and to conduct in-service training 
sessions for staff. 

The Special Education Department has expanded its 
Vocational Programs and is now offering Special Needs 
Students a greater number of vocational opportunities. 
In addition to providing pre-vocational and vocational 
skills training, onsite job placement and supervision has 
been introduced. The Special Education Department 
continues to expand these programs and offer a host of 
opportunities to its students. 

The Administrative Staff of the Special Education 
Department has written a Special Needs Booklet, describ- 
ing the 766 process and the services offered by the 
Chelmsford Public Schools. The booklets have been dis- 
tributed to local libraries, parents, physicians, private 
schools and service agencies. Additional booklets are 
available at the Special Education Office. 

The Chelmsford School Committee believes that all 
special needs students should have an opportunity to suc- 
ceed in school. The committee is ever mindful of the 
fiscal responsibilities and is continually exploring means 
to provide effective programs while maintaining a 
responsible budget. 

In conclusion: 

The School Committee will focus this coming year on: 

(1) establishing a schedule for the orderly implementa- 
tion of grade organization, administrative organi- 
zation, and school consolidation between now and 
the mid 1980's; 

(2) whether the School Committee should retain the 
right to use a closed school on a short or long term 
basis considering the following criteria: (a) possible 
unpredicted early increase in student enrollment, 
(b) interim use, (c) usefullness of the building after 
being in "storage;" 

(3) strengthening performance procedures throughout 
the school system — professional and non-profes- 
sional staff; 

(4) reviewing and acting selectively on studies and 
reports completed during the 1980-81 school year 
including review and action on the role of Coor- 
dinators and Program Supervisors; 

(5) maintaining the plan and timetable for establishing 
the School Committee's Policy Handbook; 

(6) continuing to improve School Committee/ Adminis- 
tration communication with staff, parents, students 
and townspeople regarding educational matters in- 
volving such groups in the decision-making process 
whenever possible and appropriate; 

(7) managing the school system in such a way that 
economics are achieved in the current budget as 
well as in the 1981-82 budget. 

The future holds considerable challenge for everyone 
concerned with the quality of education. Change, in its 
most positive form, can be very beneficial forcing us to do 



many things that get lost in the on-going operation. Now 
is the time to: assess needs — re-establish goals — assess 
resources required — evaluate alternative uses of re- 
sources. Once this is done, then it is possible to make and 
implement program decisions and finally, evaluate the 
results. 

Schools cannot solve the problems facing communities. 
There must be a shared responsibility with students, 
parents, teachers and administrators working together. 
With the commitment of Chelmsford staff, parents, and 
even the taxpayers who do not have children in school but 
who recognize the importance of good schools in the com- 
munity, one cannot help but feel a sense of confidence 
that Chelmsford can and will meet the challenge. 

Sincere thanks are extended once again to the town of- 
ficials and boards, to the school personnel, to the Parent- 
Teacher Organizations, to advisory study committees, to 
school volunteer workers, and to the citizens for their 
cooperation and assistance this past year. 

The School Committee is most appreciative of the 
assistance rendered by the Chelmsford Jaycee-ettes when 
its members coordinated the efforts of local organizations 
and citizens in sponsoring the townwide Pre-School Vi- 
sion Screening Clinic on September 13, 1980. 

The School Commitee wishes to extend its deep ap- 
preciation for years of dedicated and meritorious service 
to staff members who retired in 1980. 

Mrs. Grace Auger, Crossing Guard 
Mrs. Pauline Burke, Secretary, South Row School 
Mrs. Sallie Delmore, Cafeteria, High School 
Mrs. Hazel Fiske, Teacher Aide, North School 
Mr. Kenneth Heath, Industrial Arts Teacher, High 

School 
Miss Anne Hehir, Teacher, North School 
Mrs. Bernadette Looney, Teacher Aide, South Row 

School 
Mr. William Maynard, Custodian, North School 
Miss Nora Miskell, Teacher, North School 
Mrs. Lillian Ryan, Cafeteria Manager, Westlands 

School 
Mrs. Phyllis Tucker, Secretary, Parker Jr. High 

School 
Mrs. Dorothy Whitton, Teacher Aide, Westlands School 

TREE DEPARTMENT 

We are continuing with safety pruning and mainten- 
ance our number one priority, along with roadside brush 
cutting whenever possible. 

Our operating costs continue to rise but we feel we can 
continue in a safe and efficient manner by carefully plan- 
ning our priorities. 

We would like to thank all for their continuing support 
and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald P. Gray 
Tree Warden 



70 



TOWN TREASURER 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 



Balance as of July 1 , 1979 
Receipts thru June 30, 1980 

Paid out on warrants 
Balance as of June 30, 1908 



$ 4,222,483.68 
47,412,624.10 

$51,635,107.78 
-49,319,999.09 
$ 2,315,108.69 



TAX COLLECTOR 

Balances as of June 30, 1980 
Levy of 1973: 

Personal Property $ 0.00 

Excise 46,005.85 

Farm Excise 0.00 

Real Estate 0.00 



Levy of 1974: 

Personal Property 
Excise 

Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1975: 

Personal Property 
Excise 

Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1976: 

Personal Property 
Excise 

Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1977: 

Personal Property 
Excise 

Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1978: 

Personal Property 
Excise 

Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1979: 

Personal Property 
Excise 

Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1980: 

Personal Property 
Excise 

Farm Excise 
Real Estate 



$ 129.00 

30,361.33 

0.00 

0.00 



$ 574.60 

57,519.17 

0.00 

0.00 



$ 6,528.95 

51,879.23 

0.00 

1,211.61 



6,070.55 

48,978.28 

0.00 

7,122.45 



$ 14,610.65 

39,550.52 

140.25 

35,273.38 



17,654.12 

122,515.94 

116.65 

117,940.30 



$ 25,832.90 

321,136.23 

381.30 

371,117.42 



Respectfully submitted, 
James R. Doukszewicz 



Town Accountant 

Ernest F. Day Term Expires 1981 

Board of Selectmen's Executive Secretary 

Norman E. Thidemann Term Expires 1981 

Town Counsel 

James M. Harrington Term Expires 1981 

Police Chief 

Raymond P. McKeon Term Expires 1981 

Deputy Police Chiefs 
James C. Greska Pennryn D. Fitts 

Fire Chief 
Frederick H. Reid Term Expires 1981 

Cemetery Superintendent 

George Baxendale Term Expires 1981 

Park Superintendent 

Donald P. Gray Term Expires 1981 

Director of Public Health 

Richard J. Day Term Expires 1981 

Board of Health Physician 

Michael A. Gilchrist, M.D. Term Expires 1981 

Superintendent of Streets 

Harold E. Gray Term Expires 1981 

Inspector of Animals 
Dr. Martin A. Gruber Term Expires 1981 

Building Inspector 

Ronald W. Wetmore Term Expires 1981 



Local Inspector 

Bruce H. Clark 

Gas Inspector 

Neal C. Stanley 



Wiring Inspector 
Francis E. Cunningham 

Plumbing Inspector 
William H. Shedd 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira 

Town Aide and Council on Aging 
Kathleen M. Robinson 



Assistant Town Clerk 
Elizabeth D. Zamanakos 

Planning Board Clerk 

Jacqueline A. Sheehy 



Assistant Treasurer 
Florence M. Ramsay 

Board of Appeals Clerk 

Velma Munroe i 



Conservation Commission Clerk 

Janet Higgins 

Insect Pest Control Officer 

Donald P. Gray 



. 



71 



Superintendent of Public Buildings 

William W. Edge 

Veterans' Graves Officer 
George E. Baxendale 



Recreation Director 

Richard A. Page 



Recreation Comm. Clerk 

Evelyn L. Newman 



7,277.18 

145.00 

5,574.51 



164.00 

120.00 

244.00 

1,854.66 



Highway Department Foremen 

Pearl Koulas 
John Fantozzi 
Arthur Deschaine 

Dog Officer 
Frank Wotjas, Jr. 



Veteran's Agent 

Mary McAuliffe 



Assistant Dog Officer 

Stasia Wotjas 



Labor Relations Advisor 

Murphy, Lamere & Murphy 
(Replaced by Martin Ames. Esq. Jan. 1981) 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

BALANCE SHEET— JUNE 30, 1980 

REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



In Banks 
Invested 

Federal Revenue Sharing: 
Invested 

Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes: 

Levy of 1974 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1975 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1976 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1977 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1978 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1979 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1980 
Personal Property 
Real Estate 

Motor Vehicle Excise: 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 
Levy of 1975 
Levy of 1976 
Levy of 1977 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1979 
Levy of 1980 

Farm Excise: 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1979 
Levy of 1980 

Tax Titles and Possessions: 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 



2,900,717.63 
1,700,000.00 



4,600.717.63 



Departmental: 

Off Duty Work Details 
Public Buildings 
Cemetery 

Water Districts: 

Liens Added to Taxes: 
Levy of 1977 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1979 
Levy of 1980 

Aid To Highways: 
State 

Loans Authorized: 
Sewer Construction 
School Building Capital 
Improvements 

Transfers Authorized: 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 
Stabilization Fund 

Overdrawn Overlay Accounts: 
Levy of 1962-1974 
Levy of 1975 
Levy of 1976 
Levy of 1977 
Levy of 1978 

Underestimated Assessments: 
Recreation Areas 
Special Education 
Mosquito Control 

Revenue 1981: 

Appropriations Voted For 
Fiscal 1981 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 

Warrants Payable 



,200,000.00 




596,000.00 


1,796,000.00 


60,015.38 




107,071.00 


167,086.38 


804.88 




283.72 




3,013.94 




578.76 




206.50 


4,887.80 


6,809.38 




1,473.00 




16,594.60 


24,876.98 



129.00 




Payroll Deductions 


574.60 




Guarantee Deposits: 
Planning Board 


6,528.95 




School Department 


1,211.61 




Agency: 


6,070.55 




County — Sale of Dogs 


7,122.45 




County — Dog Licenses 
State — Recording Fees 


14,610.65 




State — Entertain Licenses 


35.273.38 




Tailings: 

Unclaimed Checks 


17,654.12 






117,940.30 




Trust and Investment Fund Income 
Conservation — Wright 


25,832.90 




Sale of Real Estate 


371,117.42 


604,065.93 


Sale of Cemetery Lots 
State Aid To Libraries 


46,005.85 






30,361.33 




State Grant: 


57.519.17 




Department of Elder Affairs 


51,879.23 




Federal Grants: 


48,978.28 




Public Law 92-512 


39,550.52 




School: 


122,515.94 




Public Law 81 874 


321,136.23 


717,946.55 


Title II PL 89.10 
Title IB PL 89-313 


140.25 




Title VIB PL 94-142 


116.65 




Title IVB PL 93-380 


381.30 


638.20 


Public Law 94-482 
Revolving Funds: 


11,966.23 




School Lunch 


13,456.65 


25,422.88 


School Athletics 





565 




52 


1,850.00 




1,500.00 


3 


36.00 




1,130.35 




28.00 




195.00 


1 



167,414.99 

18.79 
.70 
5,249.05 
24.080.51 
23,440.76 
5,340.33 

8,690.26 
1,679.33 
4,932.73 



72 



Merrimack Education Center 
Library — Carriage House 
Renovation 

Loans Authorized and Unissued 

Appropriation Balances Forward 

Special Project Balances Forward 

Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus 

Appropriations Authorized From: 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 
Public Law 92-512: 
Sidewalks — Acton Rd. 
Preliminary Project Study 

Stabilization Fund: 
Fire Pumping Engine 

Overlay Reserved For Abatement: 
Levy of 1979 
Levy of 1980 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Farm Excise 

Tax Title and Possessions 
Departmental 
Aid To Highways 
Water Liens 

Overestimated Assessments: 
County Tax 
Air Pollution Control 

Surplus Revenue 

Surplus Revenue Restricted 

Appropriation Control Fiscal 1981: 
Revenue 
Transfers 



3,815.47 
1,061.20 



40,015.38 
20,000.00 



43,348.68 
122,464.23 

717,946.55 

638.20 

25,422.88 

12,996.69 

120,300.38 

2,382.66 

19,176.17 
1,426.12 



25,906,223.95 
162,306.00 



20,178.99 

1,796,000.00 

623,224.89 

753,054.26 

10.439.50 



20,602.29 
1,639,355.64 
1,100,000.00 

26,068,529.95 
$34,150,961.02 



In Custody of Veterans Emergency 
Fund Committee 



In Custody of Veterans Emergency 
Fund Committee: 

Veterans Emergency Fund 



In Custody of Treasurer: 






Geo. W. Barris-Varney Playground 


2,875.41 




Conservation Fund 


68,699.06 




Stabilization Fund 


107,566.66 




Insurance Sinking Fund 


65,927.51 




Cemetery Funds: 






Geo. W. Barris Memorial 


6,265.58 




Perpetual Care 


268,271.17 




Adams Emerson 


670.55 


520,275.94 


In Custody of Library Trustees: 






Library Funds: 






Amos F. Adams 


21,355.93 




Geo. W. Barris 


1,148.17 




Frances Clark 


2,975.35 




Clement Fund 


14,417.65 




Albert H. Davis 


886.99 




Frederick B. Edwards 


4,317.08 




Nathan B. Edwards 


891.90 




Victor E. Edwards 


1,472.22 




Adam Emerson 


180.25 




Ora Flint 


4,201.69 




George Memorial 


3,006.44 




Thomas P. Proctor 


9,370.11 




Salina Richardson 


481.36 




Joseph E. Warren 


1,428.07 




Gertrude Wright 


1,120.14 




Cemetery Fund: Aaron George 


2,080.73 


69,334.08 


In Custody of Board of Selectmen: 






Emma Gay-Varney Playground 




514.63 



597,901.01 



NON-REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Cash-In Banks 



Appropriation Balances: 
School Construction 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



10,000.00 

5,445,000.00 
5,455,000.00 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit 

General: 
Outside Debt Limit 

General: 



Serial Loans: 

Inside Debt Limit 
General: 
Schools 
Outside Debt Limit 
General: 
Schools 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

June 30, 1980 

Trust and Investment Funds: 
Cash and Securities: 
In Custody of Treasurer 
In Custody of Library Trustees 
In Custody of Board of Selectmen 



5,445,000.00 
5.455,000.00 



520,275,94 

69.334.08 

514.63 



EDUCATIONAL COLLABORATIVE BOARD FUND 

Section 4-E Chapter 40 General Laws 

Cash-In Custody of Treasurer 23,458.52 



Unexpended Balance 



Changes In Surplus Revenue 
For The Year Ending June 30, 1980 

Balance July 1, 1979 

Deductions: 

Transfers-STM 1-19-80 45,703.00 

STM 5-5-80 15,000.00 



23,458.52 



Tax Titles Taken 


9,869.74 


70,572.74 
1.618,275.48 


Additions: 






Tax Titles Redeemed 


5,824.74 




Tax Titles Disclaimed 


6,684.27 




Sale of Tax Possessions 


1.604.00 




Excess 1980 RE&PP Commitments 


.06 




Omitted 1980 Assessments 


31.80 




Unexpended Appropriation 






Balances 


141,958.29 




Excess Revenues: 






Local Receipts (Recap Sheet) 


937,159.75 




County Dog Fund Grant 


3,344.32 




Misc. Other 


24,452.93 


1,121,060.16 
2,739.335.64 


Restricted To Reduce 1981 Tax Rate 




1,100,000.00 


Unrestricted 




1,639,335.64 
2,739,335.64 






73 



REVENUE SHARING FUNDS P.L. 92-512 

Balance July 1, 1979 

Plus Receipts: 
Entitlements 

July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980 459,580.00 

Interest 

July 1, 1979-June 3, 1980 36,859.72 



Less Authorized Appropriations: 
Fire Department — Wages 
Police Department — Wages 
Sidewalks 

Sidewalks — Acton Road 
Preliminary Project Study 

Appropriations Forwarded to Fiscal 1981: 

Sidewalks — Acton Road 

Preliminary Project Study 
Balance June 30, 1980 



305,367.00 

469.633.00 

5,263.42 

40,015.38 

20,000.00 



40,015.38 
20.000.00 



DEBT STATEMENT 



Bond Issue 
So. Row School 
1972 High School #1 
1972 High School #2 
Junior High School 
Westland-Harrington Schools 
Byam School 
TOTALS 



Interest 


Outstanding 


Payments 


Outstanding 


Principal 


Interest 


Rate 


6-30-79 


1980 


6-30-80 


Due 1981 


Due 1981 


3.5 


90,000. 


45,000. 


45.000. 


45.000. 


1.575. 


4.9 


480,000. 


240,000. 


240.000. 


240.000. 


11,760. 


4.4 


3,400,000. 


850,000. 


2.550,000. 


850.000. 


93,500. 


3.25 


525,000. 


110,000. 


415,000. 


105,000. 


13,488. 


4.3 


1,340,000. 


160,000. 


1.180,000. 


160,000. 


50,740. 


6.0 


1,130.000. 


105.000. 


1.025,000. 


105,000. 


58,350. 




6,965,000. 


1,510,000. 


5,455,000. 


1.505.000. 


229,413. 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Govermment: 

Moderator 

Selectmen 

Accounting 

Treasurer /Collector 

Assessors 

Town Clerk 

Public Buildings 

Law 

Elections 

Registrars 

Finance Committee 

Planning Board 

Board of Appeals 

Personnel Board 

Town Forest Committee 

Conservation Commission 

Historical Commission 

Historic District Commission 

Constable 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

Council On Aging 

Town Celebration Committee 

Town Aide 
Total General Government 

Public Safety: 

Police Department: 

Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 

Purchase Cruisers 

Mutual Aid 
Total Police Department 

Fire Department: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
East Station Construction 
Purchase New Auto 

Total Fire Department 

Misc. Protection: 
Hydrant Services 
Tree Warden 
Insect Pest Control 



1979 

300.00 

67.951.08 

47.906.34 

114.326.08 

74,367.59 

48,304.79 

46,060.64 

30,947.36 

17,605.74 

23,231.21 

791.76 

5,954.95 

4,685.37 

745.55 

80.00 

12,747.99 

1,526.84 

699.97 

120.00 

437.75 

13,184.32 

4,768.83 

11,075.78 

527,819.94 



1,037,291.71 

107,943.38 

37,560.00 

3,481.58 

1.186,276.67 



1,247,261.45 
92,725.15 
5,144.76 



1980 

300.00 

76,813.10 

49,921.03 

122,930.28 

80,784.58 

49,905.77 

50,553.37 

33,491.62 

14,566.60 

24,991.24 

1,142.58 

12,608.73 

5,043.62 

739.02 

6,477.80 

1,414.61 

798.27 

170.00 

429.50 

26,689.70 

4.782.95 

11,847.56 

576,401.93 



1,126,473.73 
156,625.20 
67,550.45 



1,363,046.61 
70,490.47 



1,345,131.36 1,440,239.58 



60,700.00 
15,864.60 
20,351.29 



66,906.00 
17,498.15 
27,623.80 



Building Inspector 

Wire Inspector 

Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Dog Officer 

Animal Inspector 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Civilian Defense 



31,457.58 
21,106.48 
4,768.44 
1,685.00 
16,840.63 
1,100.00 
2,000.00 
5,748.13 



Total Misc. Protection 


181,622.15 


Public Health: 




Salaries & Expenses 


52,284.96 


Mosquito-Aerial Spray 


8.000.00 


Study Septic Disposal 


1,625.00 


Total Public Health 


61,909.96 


Sewer Commission: 




Expenses 


441.34 


Professional Fees 


5,122.99 


Total Sewer Commission 


5,564.33 


Highway Department: 




Administration 


53,353.04 


Engineers Fees 


14,320.35 


Labor — Men 


523,064.98 


Utilities — Materials — Misc. 


170.050.11 


Waste Collection 


73.173.22 


Stabilization Fund 


10,000.00 


Machine Hire Other 


20,232.00 


Snow & Ice 


178,056.52 


Sidewalks 


44,858.06 


Chapter 90 — Maint & Construction 


— 


Chapter 825 Construction 


37,709.16 


Chapter 1140 Construction 


694.77 


Purchase of Equipment 


121,789.00 


Warning & Regulatory Signs 


4,672.82 


Drainage Construction 


43,904.91 


Total Highway Department 


1,295.878.94 


Street Lighting: 


80,163.98 


Veterans Benefits: 




Salaries & Expenses 


24,938.31 


Cash & Material Grants 


59,411.82 


Total Veterans Benefits 


84,350.13 



74 



Schools: 

School Committee 

Sup't. Office 

Supervision 

Principals 

Teachers 

Textbooks 

Library 

Audio-Visual 

Guidance 

Attendance 

Health Services 

Transportation 

Food Services 

Athletics 

Student Activities 

Custodial 

Utilities 

Maint. of Grounds 

Maint. of Buildings 

Maint. of Equipment 

Adult Education 

Civic Activities 

Programs W/O Schools 

Career Education 

Chapter 766 
Total School Department 

School Revolving Funds: 

Cafeteria 

Athletics 

Adult Education 

Civic Activities 

Title I 

Title IV 

Title VI 

Gifted & Talented 

Ed. Collaborative Fund 
Total Revolving Funds 

Regional Vocational School 

Libraries: 

Salaries 

Repair & Maint. 

Fuel, Light & Water 

Books & Periodicals 

Other Expenses 

Outlays 

Video Tape Project 

Carriage House Ren. 
Total Libraries 

Parks & Recreation: 

Parks 

Varney Playground 

Recreation Commission 

East School 

Youth Center 

Edwards Beach 

Recreation — Soccer Fields 
Total Parks & Recreation 

Insurance: 

Property Liability & All Types 
Chapter 32 B 

Total Insurance 

Cemeteries: 
Salaries 
Interments 

Labor for Lot Owners 
Repairs, Expense & Outlays 
Restore Old Cemeteries 
Improv. & Devel. Fund 
Purchase Equipment 

Total Cemeteries 



39,298.40 

305,898.91 

256,000.23 

674,577.03 

7,830,124.44 

134,830.43 

270,899.00 

118,392.60 

378,899.07 

19,999.98 

103,815.64 

715,018.94 

65,798.24 

133,908.52 

37,019.90 

686,759.76 

582,660.89 

42,894.89 

83,017.71 

83,843.57 

20,405.32 

13,573.42 

10,917.50 

36,722.23 

1,273,828.76 



54,964.26 

313,178.35 

257,366.86 

668,507.26 

8.197,761.36 

106,185.04 

268,771.47 

115,284.98 

417,536.46 

21,999.90 

109,634.97 

715,303.40 

60,472.21 

148,135.43 

41,895.84 

702.536.71 

696,667.67 

54,212.04 

69,871.35 

84,524.61 

10.423.25 

6,333.69 

10.998.50 

13,188.62 

1,388,144.66 



13,919,105.38 14,533,898.89 



646.709.20 
23,838.04 



108,848.96 

49,364.25 

96,559.08 

1,924.70 



157,372.20 

3,636.37 

14,057.13 

54,995.16 

8,585.00 

2,909.09 

503.75 

17,247.41 

259,306.11 



33,368.69 

7,2,83.85 

108,340.65 

9,184.90 

30.720.96 



215,726.85 
323,471.70 



66,477.60 
4,772.94 
1,000.00 

16,346.01 
1,500.00 
5,331.57 

25,403.00 
120,831.12 



677.996.98 
14,997.98 
12,349.30 
19,401.44 
97,280.74 
12,107.71 

153,007.66 



6,161.37 



191,999.09 
5,093.15 
16,422.89 
59,775.34 
11,870.75 
1,056.00 

10,260.42 



31.191.23 

6,751.59 

146,486.23 

12.714,47 

30,010.59 

980.00 

22.487.49 

250.621.60 



236,784.55 
369,244.42 



77.791.70 
4,852.24 
1,000.00 

26,354.17 
1,500.00 
2,773.82 

19,292.00 
133,563.93 



Unclassified: 
Memorial Day 
Town Clock 
Ambulance Service 
Town & Fin Com Reports 
Regional Drug Program 
Mental Health Program 
Elder Services of Merr. Valley 
Central Sq. — Eng. Fees 
Bus Trans Subsidy 
NMAC Assessment 
Sr. Citizen Drop-In Center 
Landfill Development 
Salt Storage Shed 
Conservation Consultant 
Traffic Control — Chelmsford St. 
' Unemployment Benefits 
Purchase Land — Conservation 
Land Appraisal — Swain Rd. 
Insurance Consultant 
Plans LaFayette Terrace 
Appraiser — Graniteville Rd. 
Cultural Council 
CATV Committee 
DPW Committee 
Renovate McFarlin Bldg. 

Total Unclassified 

Agency, Trust & Investment: 

Fees & Licenses — State & County 
Payroll Deductions 
Retirement — Pension Expense 
State & County Assessments 
Cemetery P/C Bequests 
Tax Levy Refunds 
Performance Bonds 
Misc. Trust Funds 
Water District Liens 
Police Outside Detail 
Merrimack Education Center 

Total Agency, Trust & Investment 

Interest — Loans: 

Anticipation Loans 

Bonded Debt 
Total Interest 

Principal — Loans: 

Anticipation of Revenue 
Maturing Bonded Debt 
Anticipation of Bond Issue 

Total Principal 

School Construction 

Total Disbursements 
Cash Balance on Hand June 30 
Total 



General Revenue: 
Taxes: 
Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Farm Animal Excise 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Tax Title Redemptions 
Lieu of Taxes — State Property 
Lieu of Taxes — Veterans 
Abatements 
Elderly Exemption 

Total Taxes 



1,495.20 


1,859.38 


329.51 


373.09 


1.00 


— 


6,446.50 


6,353.59 


23,736.96 


23,736.96 


8,695.00 


8,695.00 


1,800.00 


1,800.00 


1,964.39 


690.30 


27,999.96 


4.515.49 


8,592.00 


8,592.00 


7,029.20 


— 


9,574.25 


17,845.02 


3,881.88 


4,288.00 


11,000.00 


— 


300.00 


— 


14.860.68 


52,943.47 


81,500.00 


8,500.00 


450.00 


— 


5,000.00 


- 


1,200.00 


— 


995.00 


- 


- 


262.50 


— 


15.00 


— 


750.00 


- 


45.673.93 


216,851.53 


186,893.73 


19,017.00 


23,590.20 


4,982.260.12 


5.608,123.98 


433.649.70 


444,183.68 


561.500.38 


623,826.73 


14,615.00 


18,140.00 


87,568.13 


114,981.50 


5.053.00 


2,225.76 


9,323.57 


35,180.00 


10,972.19 


9.582.56 


71.944.37 


97,990.18 


98,206.03 


127,144.88 


6,294.109.49 


7,104,969.47 


37,308.11 


46,475.83 


364,392.50 


296,902.50 


401.700.61 


343,378.33 


4,500,000.00 


5,000.000.00 


1,644,214.00 


1.510.000.00 


34,214.00 


- 


6.178,428.00 


6,510,000.00 


127,716.14 


71.882.84 


34,439,823.90 


36,972.082.73 


4,222,483.68 


4,211.552.65 


38,662,307.58 


41,183,635.38 



587,011.36 

15,202,604.51 

731.25 

1,593,835.92 

16,637.20 

4,337.76 

8,711.75 
32,411.94 



556,840.88 

14,500,399.29 

623.60 

2,055,452.68 

5,824.74 

4,298.00 

9,361.70 
33,543.62 



17,446,281.69 17,166,344.51 



75 



Fines & Permits: 

Court Fines 

Permits, Fees, & Licenses 

Alcoholic Licenses 
Total Fines & Permits 

Grants and Gifts: 
County: 
Dog Fund 
Total Grants From County 

Federal Government: 
Public Law 874 
Revenue Sharing Funds 
Antirecession Fiscal Assistance 
Com. Devel. Program H.U.D. 

Total Grants From Fed'l Government 

State: 

Aid To Education 

School Building Assistance 

School Cafeteria 

Tuition, Trans, of State Wards 

School Transportation 

Aid to Public Libraries 

Highways — Chapter 81 

Highway & Transit Development 

Local Aid Fund 

Veterans Benefits 

Conservation Grant 

Crystal Lake Reimbursement 

Dept. of Elder Affairs 

School Programs 

Governors Safety Program 
Total Grants From State 

Individuals: 

Library — Carriage House 

Renovation Fund 
Total Gifts From Individuals 

Departmental Receipts: 
Selectmen 
Treasurer-Collector 
Town Clerk 
Assessors 
Police 

Public Buildings 
Highway 
Dog Officer 
Veterans Benefits 
Misc. 
Sale of Town Property 



School: 

Cafeteria — Lunch Sales 

Tuition, Rents & Misc. 

Athletic Programs 

Educational Collaborative Fund 

Civic Activities 

Adult Education 



Library: 
Fines 

Cemetery: 

Sale of Lots & Graves 
Internments, Labor, Material 
P/C Bequests 



60,504.47 
82,945.56 
26,275.00 



125,640.00 
102,965.17 
23,865.00 



184,639.75 

465,040.00 

4,308.00 

4,000.00 

657,987.75 



3,870.662.00 

1,013,212.14 

250,206.60 

126,004.00 

297,454.00 

11,905.88 

152,913.00 

148,672.00 

503,621.23 

31,698.10 

8,750.00 

64,480.01 

2,164.00 

243,127,71 



16.873.42 

10,266.07 

1,023.75 

105.00 

11,374.05 

6,947.99 

3,725.50 

760.00 

4,925.47 

91,585.17 

121,025.00 

268,611.42 

402,443.36 
29,128.47 
23,565.73 
22.400.00 



477,537.56 

4,807.30 

8,190.00 
14,728.25 
14,615.00 



26,881.60 
459,580.00 



3,921,169.00 

1,018,385.50 

258,304.36 

56,683,00 

319,234.00 

11,905.88 

233,580.00 

163,953.00 

809,014.00 

24,645.74 

45,250.00 

9,104.00 

348,306.00 

11,907.82 

7,231,442.30 



1,255.12 
18,508.75 
1,034.15 

14,533.10 

5,487.20 

7,782.56 

1,693.20 

6,801.21 

31,216.09 

21,450.00 

109,761.38 



405,791.56 
7,687.99 
13,659.86 
75,848.37 
24,334.17 
11,154.00 

538,475.95 



9,215.00 
18,012.50 
18,390.00 



Interest: 
Taxes 
Deposits 

Federal Revenue Sharing 
Antirecession Fiscal Assistance 
Total From Loans & Interest 

Refunds 

Agency, Trust & Investment: 
Payroll — Withholdings 
Cemetery P/C Interest 
Dog Licenses Due County 
Licenses Due State 
Barris Cemetery Fund 
Conservation Fund 
Douglas Cemetery Fund 
Registry Fees Due State 
Library Trust Funds 
Cash In Lieu of Bonds 
Water District Liens 
Veterans Emergency Fund 
Stabilization Fund 
Fish & Game Licenses Due State 
Police Outside Detail 
Merrimack Education Center 
Tailings 

Total Agency, Trust & Invesement 

Total Receipts 

Cash Balance on Hand July 1 

Total 



53,839.00 


69,620.88 


124,534.07 


182,875.12 


72,203.32 


36,859.72 


580.07 


- 


4,885,370.46 


5,289,355.72 


8,525.78 


21,042.96 


4,983,469.22 


5,488,558.31 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 


6,520.55 


7,404.00 


500.00 


2,364.00 


725.00 


— 


52,190.00 


4,500.00 


5,405.27 


4,205.30 


885.00 


10.00 


8,691.78 


11,180.00 


6,422.00 


— 


11,188.16 


9,582.56 


118.12 


— 


7,530.00 


12,766.94 


10,791.35 


14,428.50 


67,963.91 


97,953.20 


89,000.00 


128,585.00 


- 


6,849.24 


5,261,400.36 


5,808,387.05 


35,952,760.80 


36,961,151.70 


2,709,546.78 


4,222,483.68 


38,662,307.58 


41,183,635.38 



Total Departmental Receipts 

Municipal Indebtedness: 
Anticipation of Revenue 
Bond Issue — Crystal Lake 
Bond Issue — High School 



4,500,000.00 
34,214.00 
100,000.00 



76 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Inspector of Buildings 

Ronald W. Wetmore 



Wire Inspector 
Francis E. Cunningham 

Senior Clerk 

Catherine R. Curran 

Plumbing Inspector 

William Shedd 



Local Inspector 
Bruce H. Clark 

Junior Clerk 

Marjorie McCormack 

Gas Inspector 

Neal Stanley 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

As the first year of my term as Building Inspector has 
drawn to a close, I reflect on the past year as one of Per- 
sonal accomplishment. We have attempted to bring a 
more professional approach to the department as well as 
run it as a business. In doing this we also have attempted 
to be friendly and courteous to everyone as well as re- 
maining firm in our commitment to the various State 
Codes. We hope and feel we have accomplished this ob- 
jective. 

During, the last year we issued a total of 3034 permits 
compared to 2,465 for last year, a difference of 569. A 
total of $74,737 in fees was collected from all depart- 
ments this year and $92,068 was expended. The following 
is a breakdown of the permits issued for the year. 



Building Permits 


597 


$39,986.00 


Signs 


57 


960.00 


Yard Sales 


264 


1,320.00 


Certificate of Inspection 


93 


2,325.00 


Certificate of Occupancy 


55 


1,375.00 


Gas Permits 


664 


8,417.00 


Wire Permits 


586 


12,181.00 


Plumbing Permits 


622 


8,053.00 


Map Money 


96 


120.00 


TOTAL 


3034 


$74,737.00 



Plans for the coming year include looking with an- 
ticipation to moving into the new Town Offices. With the 
expanded room we hope to increase our efficiency even 
more and expand our services to the Town. With a full 
staff as we now have we are able to cover and respond to 
requests quicker and more efficiently. As the Town is 
growing, the growth is different than we are accustomed 
to. I forsee expanded Industrial growth in the coming 
year as well as a lot of Residential additions to existing 
homes. 

I thank each and everyone of the Inspectors for their 
assistance and help in breaking in a new Building Inspec- 
tor and making this year the fine one it has been. I also 
thank both clerks for putting up with changes I have in- 
itiated in office procedure; their help is impossible to 
measure. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ronald W. Wetmore 
Inspector of Buildings 



To The Honorable Board of Selectmen: 
Town of Chelmsford, Ma. 

Dear Board Members, 

I hereby submit my report of the Fire Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1980. 

The major problem facing the Fire Department con- 
tinues to be the energy crisis. Our records show a 31% in- 
crease in building fires, all of which were caused by burn- 
ing wood. 

The call for Medical Assistance has increased over 32% 
as more people are becoming aware of our service and 
ability in this field. 

The Fire Department feels that 1981 could be a "try- 
ing" year with the implementation of Prop. 2i/£ . We hope 
that we will be able to continue the basic needs for the 
townspeople. With a new pumper engine to be delivered 
in the spring of "81" it will not be necessary to purchase 
any new equiment in the next fiscal year. 

I wish to express my thanks to all town officials and 
employees for the excellent cooperation given to the fire 
department during the past year, and again like to con- 
gratulate and thank the men of the department for conti- 
nuing to maintain the high standard of courage and 
ability that has been shown in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frederick H. Reid 
Fire Chief 



PERSONNEL 

Fire Chief 
Frederick H. Reid 

Deputy Fire Chief 
Edward G. Quinn 

Captains 
Thomas P. Miskell (Acting) Ronald J. Sawicki 
Charles S. Galloway, Jr. Ronald O. Wikander (Res.) 
James M. Spinney James A. Sousa 



Firefighters 



Arthur G. Anderson 
Bertrand E. Dixon, Jr. 
Charles Ferreira 
Robert K. Adams 
Alvin F. Wetmore 
Jack D. Hadley 
Harvey M. Miller 
Robert A. Bennett 
Robert R. Gagnon 
Harold J. Pierce, Jr. 
Donald A. Weber 
Paul D. Henderson 



John P. DePalma 
Walter F. Adley, Jr. 
Dennis Vargeletis 
Richard L. Grenon 
Ronald L. Johnson 

(Retired 3/19/80) 
Wallace V. Maybury, Jr. 
William V. Cady, Jr. 
William F. Curran 
Daniel T. Reid 
Joseph J. Spinazola 
Michael McTeague 



77 



Peter T. Wetherbee 
Francis J. Conlin 
Donald A. Drew 
James T. Cutter 
Gerald D. Tonks 
Richard P. O'Neil 
Robert L. Hughes 
Thomas J. Curran 
James P. Flaherty 
Joseph F. Lynch 



Ernest J. Frobese 
James P. Curran 
Charles A. Schramm 
Peter C. Johnson 
William M. Burke, Jr. 
Edward J. Nolet 
Michael F. Curran 
Michael D. Ridlon 
William H. Jamer 
Raymond R. Kydd 



Paul D. Hayes 
Terrance A. Goode 
William H. Hadley 
Leo A. Martin 
Emil P. Magiera 
Philip Dube 
Joseph E. Staveley 



Mary Ann Koulas 



James Boermeester 

William Dalton 

Thomas D. Miskell 

David Gelineau 

Brian J. Stanton (Prov.) 

Richard Miller 

Dennis Keohane (Prov.) 



Jack Smith 



Vehicle Accidents 
Brush 
Building 
Dump 

False-Malicious 
False - Accidental 
Misc. 
Lock Out 
Med. Assist. 
Vehicle 
Mutual Aid 
Total =1305 



CALLS FOR ASSISTANCE 1980 
Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 



2 


4 


6 


7 


6 


8 


2 


10 


12 


6 


5 


4 


37 


45 


30 


55 


29 


17 


9 


10 


10 


15 


28 


8 


13 


11 


9 


10 


10 


9 


8 


8 


8 


5 


18 


20 





1 














1 





1 











5 


3 


3 


2 


1 


3 


2 


5 


6 


4 


2 


1 


8 


8 


5 


8 


5 


10 


9 


5 


1 


11 


7 


7 


26 


22 


16 


27 


25 


33 


33 


17 


18 


15 


26 


19 


4 


1 


1 











4 








1 


2 





19 


17 


19 


18 


24 


29 


36 


23 


19 


18 


28 


26 


5 


7 


11 


8 


5 


3 


10 


4 


4 


7 


9 


5 


2 


5 


1 


1 


5 


1 


3 





1 


4 


3 


3 



121 124 101 136 110 113 117 82 86 86 128 101 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the Highway Department 
for the year 1980: 

The following streets were accepted at the Annual 
Town Meeting: 

Progress Avenue 
Industrial Avenue 
Scienta Drive 
Hope Street 

Drainage projects constructed by Highway Department 
personnel include the following: 

North Road 89'T2" aluminum pipe, 2 catch 

basins installed. Curbing reset and 
installed. 

Smith Street 46-12" aluminum pipe, 1 catch 
basin installed. 

Jonathan Lane 447'-6" aluminum perforated pipe 
installed. 1 Distribution box. 

Fairbanks Road 90' -6" perforated pipe installed. 

Erlin Road 90'-12" aluminum pipe, 1 manhole 

installed. 

Drexel Drive 60-15" concrete pipe, 1 stone header 
installed. 

Oriole Street 70'T2" aluminum pipe, 2 catch 
basins installed. 

Larrsen Circle 138'-18" concrete pipe, 280'T5" steel 
pipe, 1 manhole installed. 



Drainage projects designed by Emmons, Fleming & 
Bienvenu, Inc., Consultants to the Highway Department 
and awarded to contractors for construction and com- 
pleted in 1980 are as follows: 

Dunstable Road 

Robin Hill Road 

Parkerville Road 

Garrison Road 

Seventy six streets were treated with liquid asphalt us- 
ing 73,739 gallons of asphalt. 

Streets resurfaced with Type 1-1 bituminous concrete 
surface are as follows: 

North Road Three sections of roadway resurfaced 

— (1) From Town Hall to 495 Bridge 

(2) From Interstate 495 Bridge to ap- 
prox. 100 feet beyond Dalton Road, 
including Dalton Road intersections 

(3) From Village View Road to 156 
North Road. 

Dunstable Road Road resurfaced from Marinel Ave- 
nue to Swain Road. 

Graniteville Rd. From School Street to Westford line 
including intersection at School 
Street. Roadway excavated, regrad- 
ed, regravelled, resurfaced with 
binder course and top course of 
bituminous concrete. Shoulders of 
roadway loamed and seeded. Five 
catch basins adjusted, two catch 
basins, 112 feet steel pipe installed. 
557 lin. feet of asphalt berm install- 



78 



ed. 88 stone bounds were installed by 
the County Engineers assisted by 
highway department personnel. 

Richardson Rd. Surface of existing roadway leveled. 
Roadway excavated, regraded, re- 
gravelled, resurfaced with binder 
course and top course of bituminous 
concrete. Two stone headers built. 
Shoulders of roadway cut back and 
area landscaped. 

Lafayette Terr. Roadway excavated, regravelled, 
regraded, resurfaced with binder 
and top course of bituminous con- 
crete. Shoulders of roadway loamed 
and seeded. 

Brian Road Portions of roadway excavated, re- 

gravelled and patched with bitumin- 
ous concrete. Also portion of road- 
way resurfaced with an asphalt and 
sand mix and sealed. 

Brooks were cleaned at the following locations: 
Balsam Drive 
Bailey Terrace 
Graniteville Road 
Richardson Road 
Sands Place 
Drexel Drive 

Guard rail was installed at a hazardous curve on Main 
Street at Wilson Lane. 

Retaining stone walls were built on High Street and 
Grove Street. 



A section of sidewalk was installed on Fletcher Street. 

Effective July 1, 1980, after advertising and receiving 
bids for waste collections, the town awarded the contract 
to Browning-Ferris Industries, Inc. 

New equipment approved at the Annual Town Meet- 
ing and purchased for the Highway Department are as 
follows: (1) Front End Loader; (1) Pickup Truck; (1) 
Dump Truck; (1) Air Compressor; (2) Sander Bodies. 
These bodies were mounted on Truck Chassis previously 
used on Waste Collections. The waste collection packer 
bodies were dismounted and sold. The truck chassis drive 
shafts and frames were shortened and the new 12 foot 7.6 
cubic yard sander bodies were mounted on the truck 
chassis. 

The usual oiling of streets, including mix-in-places, 
brush butting, fabricating, replacing and installing street 
signs, painting traffic lines, cleaning catch basins, 
rebuilding and repairing sunken catch basins, sanding, 
snow plowing and snow removal, sweeping streets, drain- 
age and general maintenance was performed throughout 
the year. 

I wish to thank the townspeople for their kind con- 
sideration and cooperation and the Police Department 
for notifying the department of dangerous road condi- 
tions during the winter months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold Gray 
Supt. of Streets 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Board of Selectmen 

Town Hall 

North Road 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts 01824 

Dear Board Members: 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review, the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the fiscal year 1980. 

At the present time the department is made up of 51 
permanent men. 

Chief of Police 
Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Chief of Administration 
James C. Greska 

Deputy Chief of Operations 

Pennryn D. Fitts 



Sergeants 
Leslie H. Adams William R. McAllister 

ArmandJ. Caron Raymond G. McCusker 

Walter W. Edwards, Jr. Phillip N. Moelleur 
John J. Mack John O. Walsh 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
John J. Bell 
Mark L. Burlamachi 
Robert M. Burns 
Steven A. Burns 
David C. Campbell 
Lance Cunningham 
Patrick W. Daley 
Bruce A. Darwin 
Frederick G. Dillon 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
Blair J. Finnegan 
William J. Floyd 
Joseph R. Gamache 



Patrolmen 

James J. Kerrigan 
Ronald A. Leach 
Roland E. Linstad 
Russell H. Linstad 
Henry R. McEnany 
James F. Midgley 
Thomas A. Niemaszyk 
Timothy F. O'Connor 
Robert A. Popplewell 
John E. Redican 
Chandler Robinson 
Francis X. Roark 
Edward C. Rooney 
William S. Strobel, Jr. 
Robert J. Trudel 
Daniel J. Walsh 



79 



Charles D. Harvey Eugene W. Walsh 

Francis P. Kelly William R. Walsh 

Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 

Intermittent Patrolmen 

Francis M. Conlon John M. McGeown, Jr. 

James T.H. Finnegan James F. Palmer 

Jared Finnegan William R. Ryder 

Michael W. Stott 

Police Matrons 

Patricia A. Caparella Mary Long 

Nora F. Clifford Emily Peake 

Barbara W. Gibb Barbara A. Power 

Senior Clerks 

Patricia A. Caparella Nora F. Clifford 

Pauline B. Gervais 

Junior Clerks 

Irene A. McHugh Barbara A. Power 

Custodian 
John P. Curran 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

1979 1980 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 16,368 14,494 

Summons Served 3,023 740 

Licenses Suspended 29 64 

Accidents Reported 1,328 1,451 

Personal Injuries Reported .... 284 347 

Fatal Accidents 4 4 

Mileage of Cruisers 415,778 409,390 

Special Property Checks 

(Aux. Police) 7,556 

Station Lockups 513 820 

Citations Issued 3,667 5,311 

Parking Violations 327 1,976 

Doors and Windows found open . . 177 195 

Detoxification Unit 364 182 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 



1979 



1980 

4,415.00 

2,464.00 

27.00 

542.00 



Photocopying Machine $3,884.00 

Firearm Permits 3,154.00 

Bicycle Registrations 39.00 

Firearm Identification Cards .... 550.00 

Court Fines 125,066.47142,120.00 

Photographs 582.00 704.60 

Police Detail Account 

Service Charge 2,882.05 3,928.00 

ARRESTS 

Crimes Against Persons 151 

Crimes Against Property 146 

Crimes Against Public Order 960 

DISPOSITION OF CASES IN 1980 

Fined 263 

Placed on Probation 69 

Suspended Sentence and placed on Probation 4 

Placed on file 185 

Not Guilty Finding 9 

Dismissed with Probable Cause 50 



Ordered to Pay Court Costs and Continued 

Without a Finding 158 

Committed to Youth Service Board 6 

Committed to M.C.I. Walpole 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 

Committed to M.C.I. Billerica 18 

Turned over to other out of town Police Depts. 

and Courts 243 

Cases Pending and Continued in the Courts 281 

Placed on Alcohol Safety Program 82 

After several months of an acting administration, the 
permanent administrative structure relative to the Chief 
and Deputy Chiefs was completed. On March 27, 1980 
former Lowell District Court Prosecutor, Captain Ray- 
mond P. McKeon was appointed Chief of Police. Also on 
March 27, 1980, former Acting Chief, Captain James C. 
Greska was appointed Deputy Chief of Administration 
and Captain Pennryn D. Fitts was appointed Deputy 
Chief of Operations. Sergeant Walter W. Edwards, Jr., 
was re-assigned as Prosecutor to Lowell District Court 
and Sergeant William R. McAllister was named head of 
the Criminal Bureau by Chief McKeon. Acting Sergeant 
Raymond G. McCusker and John O. Walsh were ap- 
pointed permanent Sergeants. An examination for Cap- 
tain was held in October, 1980 to replace the three Cap- 
tains who were eventually appointed to the top ad- 
ministrative positions. This year we have also had two (2) 
patrolmen retire. Officer John B. Sousa retired on May 
15, 1980 after 18 years of service with the Chelmsford 
Police Department. Officer John G. Harrington retired 
on July 31, 1980 after 6 years of service with the Chelms- 
ford Police Department. 

The Police Department has completed implementation 
of the recommendations of the Police Management 
Study. The Department will continue to use these guide- 
lines in the management and direction of the department 
in the ensuing years. 

Three Police Officers graduated from the Massachu- 
setts Criminal Justice Council's Basic Recruit course. 
They were William J. Floyd, Francis P. Kelly and 
Chandler Robinson. 

The Community Services and Safety Unit this year dis- 
tributed approximately 20,000 brochures. These bro- 
chures covered bicycle, pedestrian and personal safety. 
He also conducted 50 safety lectures to elementary school 
children and will continue to help educate both the walk- 
ing and motoring public in regards to the safety of the 
community. 

The Crime Prevention Unit participated in 40 neigh- 
borhood watch meetings as well as 30 programs dissem- 
inating Rape information and numerous robbery preven- 
tion programs. These programs have brought the Police 
and the community closer together in a crime fighting ef- 
fort. 

Although charges for juvenile crimes remained about 
the sme in 1980 we had 60% fewer juvenile arrests than in 
1979. This is a direct result of a successful Juvenile court 
diversion program conducted by this department in 
which first offenders are given an option to work off their 
sentence. 



80 



New traffic laws have been approved by the Attorney 
General and the Police Department has continued a 
vigorous enforcement of this law concerning fire lanes. 

At the present time, 20 members of the Chelmsford 
Police Department have received college degrees to date; 
and 22 additional officers are presently enrolled in degree 
courses in area colleges and universities. 

In a continuing effort to upgrade the quality of Police 
service to the town of Chelmsford many officers attended 
specialized training schools to increase their expertise in 
the law enforcement field. 

Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council: 

Understanding and Motivating Personnal 1 man 

Background Investigation Techniques 2 men 

Drug Investigation Course 3 men 

Drug Education Course 2 men 

Leadership and Management Styles 3 men 

Motorcycle Operation and Enforcement 1 man 

Pre-Retirement Planning Seminar 1 man 

Budget Justification 1 man 

Delegation of Authority 2 men 

Recognition of Stress in Employees 1 man 

Hazardous Materials and Emergencies 1 man 

Criminal Law Update 2 men 

Public Speaking for Crime Prevention 1 man 

Selective Enforcement 1 man 

Motor Vehicle Law — Chapter 90 3 men 

Breathalyzer Training 3 men 

Planning, Decision Making and Problem Solving . . 1 man 

Advanced Arson School 2 men 

Crimes Against the Person 1 man 

Management of Change 1 man 

Education will continue to be a prime goal of our 
Department during 1981. 

During 1980 we began a new process of micro filming 
our records. This process will save considerable time, 
paper, storage and money for the Town. 

I would like to express my sincerest appreciation to the 
Board of Selectmen and all town officials and committees 
for the excellent cooperation given to the Police Depart- 
ment and also congratulate the Deputy Chiefs, Super- 
visors, Officers and Civilian Employees of the department 
for once again, maintaining their high performance stan- 
dards. 

Sincerely, 

Raymond P. McKeon 
Chief of Police 



ANIMAL INSPECTORS REPORT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Dear Board; 

The following is the Animal Inspectors report for the 
year 1980. 



Number of dog bites 
Number of cattle 
Number of horses 
Number of sheep 
Number of swine 
Number of goats 



26 

186 

64 

18 

300 

2 

Respectfully submitted, 

Martin A. Gruber, DVM 



AUXILIARY POLICE 

Director 

Walter W. Edwards Jr. Sgt. C.P.D. 

Co-ordinator 

Basil Larkin Sgt. (ret.) C.P.D. 

During 1980 the Auxiliary Police participated in thir- 
teen events, VFW Road Race, Elk's Road Race, Parades, 
Halloween, JayCees Spook House, Scout House Spook 
House, Dog Show, July 4th festivities and the Boston 
Marathon. 

The Chelmsford Auxiliary Police graduated 12 officers 
from the Mass. Criminal Justice Training Council 
Reserve Officers Training Academy, the first auxiliary 
unit in the state to attend. The remainder of the unit will 
attend the first session in 1981. The In-House Training 
program was expanded this year using the resources of 
the Police Department. The Auxiliary completed recerti- 
fication in Cardio- Pulmonary Resuscitation (C.P.R.) and 
the First Responders First Aid Course. A-Medic am- 
bulance provided the instructors for the First Responders 
Course. Two members of the Auxiliary are certified 
Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and two mem- 
bers are certified CPR instructors. 

Operation House Check was in operation 190 nights 
checking 5426 homes as well as 2130 School checks while 
assisting the regulars at numerous accidents, fires and 
other activities. A total of 19,250 miles logged with a total 
of 2307 man-hours. 



Our thanks to the officers and men of the Police Dept. 
for their support and invaluable assistance. 



81 



The breakdown on hours for 1980 is, training 2967, 

duty 3322, work projects 294, for a total of 6583 man 
hours. 

Roster 
Lloyd Anstey Edward Norton 

William Arsenault Bruce Pemberton 

Kenneth Berger Frank Poirier 

Sherwin Borden Bradford Poole 

George Brown James Quinn 

Richard Demers David Ramsay 

James Ernst D. Scot Ringerson 

Alan Grekula Ralph Roscoe 

Anne Grekula R. Duncan Smith 

William Keenan Michael Taplin 

Costos Kevghas Paul Villare 

Frederic Mehan Karen Wharton 

ENERGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE 




CHELMSFORD ENERGY ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE (CEAC) 

The early part of the year was spent getting organized 
and prioritizing the many directions and projects which 
CEAC could take, under the chairmanship of Ed Hart. 
Ed Hart resigned in early 1980 and Jean-Paul J. Gravell 
was elected chairman. 



These measures covered a span of energy conservation 
techniques which have been implemented in the past 50 
years to some of the most recent engineering achieve- 
ments. 

The committee was very disappointed by a number of 
decisions and/or lack of response by the Selectmen and 
architect. It is the hope of the committee that more 
positive action will be taken in the future. 

The library conservation measures and almost all of 
the new town office building measures were either re- 
jected, not considered, not analyzed or just dropped by 
the Board of Selectmen or the Town Office Building 
Committee of the Finance Committee or a combination 
of those bodies. Additionally, the purchase of energy 
monitoring equipment was rejected by the Board of 
Selectmen and the budget of CEAC was cut so drastically 
that without emergency funds the committee will have to 
suspend operations in February 1981 until July 1981. 

In the area of positive achievements, it can be said that 
CEAC is working on several projects and studies aimed at 
assisting the town government in decreasing its energy 
costs, and educating its citizens. Among these are: zoning 
articles to make conservation easier or possible; hydro, 
heat from waste, wind power, energy fair, energy audits 
and town energy fund. 

In summary, the committee members became 
educated in many technical and non-technical areas in- 
volving energy use and conservation. A facet of commit- 
tee operation which will be stressed in the coming year is 
closer, more frequent two-way communications with 
other town boards and committees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jean-Paul J. Gravell, Chairman 



An early decision of the committee was to give priority 
attention to town government projects and second priori- 
ty to assisting citizen's conservation measures. Two major 
projects supported by CEAC were conservation measures 
for the library and McFarlin "new town office building". 
A considerable amount of time and effort was expended 
by the committee members, in preparing recommenda- 
tions or positions on energy conservation measures and in 
meetings with the library director, Selectmen, architect 
for the "new town office building", some outside profes- 
sional consultants and the Chelmsford Finance Commit- 



Many energy conservation measures applying to the 
"new town office building" and library were either 
recommended for implementation or recommended for 
engineering analysis. These included among many 
others; passive solar (greenhouse entryway and trombe 
wall), active solar, high R insulation, outside insulation, 
night flushing in hot weather, insulating blinds, efficient 
lighting, zoned heating and cooling, heat exchangers for 
replacement air, dual fuel heating/cooling units, window 
blocking and insulating, environmental planting, 
weather stripping, thermal shades. 

The committee also recommended the purchase of 
energy monitoring equipment (wind, temperature, 
solar). 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 



Dana Caffelle 
Raymond Day 



James K. Gifford 
Charles Marderosian 



The Celebrations Committee, was very active this past 
year, the 325th Anniversary of the founding of the Town 
of Chelmsford. The Committee worked with the Mem- 
orial Day Committee. Following their parade and cele- 
bration, a 325th Anniversary Celebration was held at the 
Unitarian Church Parking Lot, where a large cake was 
cut and distributed to all who attended. Many thanks to 
the Chelmsford Girl Scouts, Nashoba Regional Voca- 
tional School and the Yum Yum Shop for making the 
325th Anniversary Celebration a success. 

As in past years the committee has been active in mak- 
ing preparations for the annual Fourth of July Celebra- 
tion, this past year an anniversary celebration. The 
Chelmsford Minutemen Coordinating Committee are to 
be complimented once again for their planning and ad- 
ministration of the 1980, 325th Anniversary, Fourth of 
July Celebration. 

The Committee thanks the Recreation Commission for 
the road races, the Chelmsford Art Society for the Art 



82 



Festival, acknowledges the efforts of the Fire, Police, 
Park and Public Works Departments for their coopera- 
tion and assistance, also thanks to volunteers of the 
Chelmsford Auxiliary Police. 

The committee are now in the process of making 
preparations for the 1981 Fourth of July Celebration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 

CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Director 



GeorgeJ. Brown 
Melvin P. Dejager 
George R. Dixon 
Raymond Day 



William W. Edge 

Walter W. Edwards 

Charles S. Galloway 

Donald Savage 



The Office of Emergency Preparedness, Civil Defense 
Committee, formerly under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Defense, is now a new government agency known 
as (F.E.M.A.) Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
the committee meet regularly on the second Tuesday of 
each month to prepare all necessary reports and papers 
for the State and F.E.M.A. agencies for surplus equip- 
ment and matching funds. 

The Communications Center participate in monthly 
radio drills with CD. Area No. 1 Headquarters in Tewks- 
bury and other Emergency Operating Centers in other 
cities and towns. 

Chelmsford's Emergency Operating Center, is now in 
the process of being moved to the basement of the new 
Town Hall on Billerica Road, F.E.M.A. Engineers have 
been surveying the building for Chelmsford to be eligible 
for future government funding. 

The Auxiliary Police volunteers have been most effec- 
tive, assisting the Chelmsford Police Department in 
Vacation House Check, also assistance during the various 
celebrations in the Town. 

I wish to thank the Executive Secretary, Board of 
Selectmen and all Department Heads and personnel for 
their cooperation received this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Director 



CHELMSFORD INDUSTRIAL 
DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

EugeneJ. Doody Thomas A. St. Germain 

L. James Glinos John L. Sullivan, Jr. 

TimothyJ. Hehir PatrickJ. Wood 

George B. Parrent, Jr. 

1980 was the first full year of operation for the 
Chelmsford Industrial Development Commission since it 
was reestablished by vote of the Board of Selectmen in 
June 1979. Quarterly meetings of the Commission were 
scheduled during the year as the IDC moved to ac- 
complish its objectives of providing a planned growth 
concept utilizing community input in the development of 
industrial lands and properties in the town of Chelms- 
ford, and to broaden the community's tax base while pro- 
viding employment opportunities for Chelmsford area 
residents. 

During 1980 industrial and commercial properties in- 
creased in valuation to $40,630,000. This increased 
valuation provided tax revenue to the community of 
$2,153,000. During 1980 the Commission accomplished 
the following: 

Completed a detail survey of Assessor records to iden- 
tify private owners of industrial lands to ascertain objec- 
tives for use of these properties. 

Developed a plan to identify and codify Chelmsford 
Area real estate agencies specializing in industrial proper- 
ties. 

In cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of 
Commerce and Development, developed a centralized 
data base for 18 industrial development incentives to en- 
courage the location and expansion of business organiza- 
tions in Massachusetts. 

Coordinated responses to inquiries from local, state, 
and national organizations requesting information regar- 
ding the availability of industrial properties in the town 
of Chelmsford. 

For the Commission 

Eugene J. Doody, Chairman 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Members 



Judith Hass 
John Droescher 
James McBride 



George LeMasurier 



Edward Marshall 

Charles Galloway 

Henry McEnany 



The following two members were not reappointed: 
John McCormack and Frank Siraco. 

The following five members resigned: Lawrence Cunn- 
ingham, Edward Duffy, John Chiungas, Dennis Ready, 
and Gregory Beswick. 



83 



Term 

Membership Status 1979-80 Responsibility Exp. 

Judith Hass Chairman 1981 

John Droescher Land Acquisition 1982 

Charles Galloway Reservation Management 1982 

Edward Marshall Wetlands (Treasurer) 1983 

James McBride Reservation Mgmt. (Clerk) 1983 

Henry McEnany Reservation Management 1982 

George LeMasurier Wetlands 1982 

Mrs. Janet Higgins is our part-time secretary. Member- 
ship changes during the year included the appointments 
of Charles Galloway (replaced Dennis Ready), John 
Droescher (replaced Edward Duffy), Edward Marshall 
(replaced John McCormack), James McBride (replaced F. 
Siraco), Henry McEnany (replaced Lawrence Cunn- 
ingham), and George LeMasurier (replaced Gregory Bes- 
wick). 

The Commission has encouraged interested citizens to 
become consulting conservation commission members. A 
group of concerned citizens have attended workshops and 
meetings and have expressed an interest in helping the 
commission with reservation work and educational pro- 
grams. 

Interboard Cooperation 

Rapport between the Building Inspector, Board of Ap- 
peals and the Planning Board has been excellent. The 
Planning Board and Board of Appeals routinely asks for 
the Commission's opinion on preliminary subdivision 
plans or appeals cases so that the applicants immediately 
know when a wetland permit must be obtained from the 
Conservation Commission, thus eliminating possible wet- 
lands problems and undue costs to the applicant and/or 
town. 

Neighboring Commissions 

The Commission has and will continue to seek close 
cooperation with neighboring commissions — specifically 
Westford, Carlisle and Lowell. 



Massachusetts. Acceptance of this plan will ensure our 
eligibility to participate in the state's Self- Help Program. 
This updated plan emphasizes the need to utilize and 
protect our existing conservation land, wetlands and 
open spaces. The purpose of the commission's Land Ac- 
quisition Program is to protect Chelmsford's natural 
resources including its acquifers. It is to that purpose that 
our 1981-1982 efforts will be directed. 

Reservations Management 

Again, a great deal of effort was directed toward the 
improvement of conservation lands so as to promote 
greater public use. Mr. Kenneth St.Hilaire, a CETA 
employee for three months, has devoted most of his time 
clearing trails, brush removal, and general reservation 
maintenance. 

A new parking lot at Wright Reservation was con- 
structed. It is located off of Parker Road and can accom- 
modate school buses. 

Brush removal and trail maintenance at Stony Brook, 
Wright, Deep Brook and Crooked Spring Reservations 
has been of prime concern to the commission. The Stony 
Brook and Deep Brook have been cleared to afford full 
utilization of the brooks. Continued maintenance and 
improvement of the reservations is a priority for the Con- 
servation Commission in 1981-1982. We hope by improv- 
ing conditions at our various reservations we can en- 
courage the townspeople to better utilize them. 

A series of educational pamphlets and/or programs are 
scheduled. Consulting commission members will be 
utilized for such a program. 

Surveying of Wright Reservation and the Town Forest 
has been completed. 

The wood-cutting program at Wright Reservation was 
discontinued this year due to the condition of the reserva- 
tion and the need for greater supervision of this program. 



Wetlands 

A total of nine hearings were held under the Wetlands 
Protection Act (Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachu- 
setts General Laws). This is a sharp drop in the number 
of hearings. In all instances, Orders of Conditions were 
issued. 

The Commission undertook a program of follow-up on 
old Orders of Conditions which had not been finally clos- 
ed. A total of seven follow-ups so far have been issued. 

Carr Research Laboratory, Inc. conducted a series of 
training seminars for commission members and in- 
terested citizens on hydrology, map interpretation, and 
wetlands. 

Land Acquisitions 

The town acquired 3.5 acres of land through a gift. 
The land is located off of Parkerville Road. It is part of a 
major wetlands area and is adjacent to a town pond. The 
town now has 395.5 acres of conservation land. 

An updated Open Space Plas was submitted to the 
Division of Conservation Services, Commonwealth of 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Nineteen hundred and eighty has been a successful 
year, as the many volunteers and staff continued to strive 
to assist the elderly of Chelmsford. The year also brought 
the death of member Gula R. Boyce who had been very 
active in helping seniors since the early days of the Coun- 
cil. She will be greatly missed. 

The facilities of the Senior Citizen Drop In Center af- 
forded information, referral, assistance and socialization 
to many of Chelmsford's older residents. 

The Council on Aging Van traveled 16,907 miles and 
provided 5,871 passenger trips to residents free of charge. 

Nutrition services were again very successful due to the 
dedicated volunteers and staff of the Chelmsford School 
Food Services. Although the Elderly Lunch Program 
operates only three (3) days a week at the McCarthy 
Junior High over 25,000 meals were served at the school 
or delivered to the home bound. 



84 



The annual influenza immunization provided free pro- 
tection to four hundred (400), seniors during clinics held 
in October and November. In addition, one hundred 
(100) persons received pneumonia vaccinations. 

The Council directly sponsored monthly podiatry 
clinics at the Center and assisted more than one hundred 
and fifty (150) residents. 

The Health Maintenance Clinics offered approximate- 
ly eighty (80) clinics and served over five hundred (500) 
clients throughout the Town. This service was continued 
through a grant from Elder Services of the Merrimack 
Valley to the Lowell Visiting Nurse Association. 

Fifty-nine (59) individuals received legal assistance 
through a contract with the Merrimack Valley Legal Ser- 
vices. 

As a sponsoring member of Elder Services of the Mer- 
rimack Valley, Chelmsford continued to make supportive 
services available to its older residents. Eighty-eight (88) 
individuals received the homemaker, home health aide, 
chore services necessary to make independent living possi- 
ble. Twenty-nine hundred and ninety-four (2,994) 
telephone reassurance contacts were made to Chelmsford 
seniors. 

The Senior Aide Program employed four outreach 
workers who provided various person assistance making 
over six thousand (6,000) visits to home bound residents. 

Income tax assistance was provided to forty-seven (47) 
residents. 

Twenty-five thousand monthly newsletters were distri- 
buted during 1980; bringing important information to 
seniors in town. 

The Vial of Life Program reached almost four thou- 
sand (4,000) residents through tremendous volunteer ef- 
forts. 

Twenty-nine families received support through the 
Respite Care Program, which provides supervision for an 
older family member so that the family can leave the 
home temporarily. 

The Council helped to sponsor ten trips planned by the 
Chelmsford Senior Citizen Club to recreational attrac- 
tions of New England. 

In closing much credit for the success of 1980 belongs 
to volunteers who have given a great deal of time and ef- 
fort to benefit these programs. The Council extends ap- 
preciation to these individuals and all Town Officials for 
this continued support. 



DOG OFFICER 

The following is a report of my services as Dog Officer 
for year 1980. 



William R. Marson, Chairman 

_ouise M. Bishop, Vice Chairman 

Edna Nelson, Treasurer 

Kathleen M. Robinson, Secretary 

Christina Ahern 

Arthur Cooke 



Respectfully submitted, 

Sara Dunigan 

Lillian Gould 

Mary McAuliffe 

Howard Moore 

H. Chadbourne Ward 



Stray dogs sold to individuals 
Stray dogs sent to Medical School 
Stray dogs disposed of 



Complaints investigated 

Miscellaneous calls 

Dead animals picked up 

Miles traveled 

Lost dogs returned to owners 



35 

121 

6 



162 

805 

2,512 

320 

20,150 

315 



Respectfully submitted, 

Frank Wojtas, Jr. 
Dog Officer 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John P. Richardson, Chairman 

Martha Sanders, Clerk 

Jane B. Drury George A. Parkhurst Joseph V. Kopycinski 

Members leaving during the year: 
Emile Dumont 
Richard Lahue 
Gerald Locker 

The Historical Commission met at the 1802 
Schoolhouse on the last Thursday of each month during 
the year. 

Eight historically significant buildings were 
documented and placed in the inventory of the Town's 
historical assets. The Chelmsford Center Historic District 
was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 
March, 1980, culminating an effort begun by the mem- 
bers of the Historical Commission in 1977. Under Histori- 
cal Commission sponsorship, an on-site archeological 
survey was conducted which physically located the site of 
Chelmsford's first town meeting in 1655. The project was 
directed by Mr. Robert Drinkwater, a professional arche- 
ologist, who was assisted by a group of 15 students and 
teachers from Chelmsford High School. Positive 
knowledge of this historically valuable site will serve to in- 
fluence preservation of the locale, if future development 
of the area is considered. 

Once again the Chelmsford second graders had the op- 
portunity to attend a four hour simulated mid- 19th cen- 
tury classroom at the 1802 Schoolhouse, with more than 
15 different classes attending during the fall session. 

The following year will see a curtailment of the Com- 
mission's historical site marking project, in response to 
the public mandate to reduce town expenses. The Com- 
mission will continue to maintain and augment the inven- 
tory of the historic assets of the town and will continue to 
advocate preservation of these assets for the benefit of all. 

Respectfully submitted, 
John P. Richardson, Chairman 



85 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Members 

Robert P. La Porte, Jr., Chairman 
John P. Richardson, Vice Chairman 
Richard O. Lahue, Sr. 
Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D. 
Jeanne L. Parlee 

Alternates 

Harold J. Davis 
Leon O. LeMaire III 

During the year 1980, the Historic District Commission 
met at the 1802 School House on the first and third Mon- 
day of each month. The following Certificates of Ap- 
propriateness were issued by the Commission: 

Central Cong. ChurchFebruary 4, 1980 — erection of a 
1 Worthen St. porch-type structure over the rear 

door entrance facing the parking 

lot. 



George Brown 
15-17 Westford St. 

Patricia E. Irela 
Calico Clutter — 
Central Sq. 

Rose Marie Bagni 
The Rose Unisex 
Salon 



April 7, 1980 — moving the en- 
trance doorway 3 feet to the right. 

April 7, 1980 — erection of a yel- 
low wood sign with black gothic 
letters 4'x7" 

April 29, 1980-erection of a 
7'xl4i/&" sign off white back- 
ground with black lettering to 
match existing signs in the en- 
trance at the Center Mall. 



Joseph B. Shanahan May 19, 1980 — erection of three 

Jr. & Dennis E. signs, two 16'x2' and one 4' dark 

McHugh green backbround with gold leaf 

56 Central Sq. letters. 



James McClutchy 
16-18 Westford St. 



April 29, 1980 — construction, re- 
construction, demolition, altera- 
tion and landscaping of this pro- 
perty. 



Central Cong. Churchjune 16, 1980 — erection of four 
1 Worthen St. traffic signs — two will be 2"x8"x 

24" wooden signs to be placed at 
the entrance and exit on Worthen 
St. Two will be 18"x24", one will 
be attached to the wall of the 
building on the South side facing 
North Rd. and one will be on the 
white fence post on the North side 
facing North Rd. 



Richard P. 
Burkinshaw, Blake 
Memorial Funeral 
Home, 24 Worthen 
St. 



August 18, 1980 — replacement 
of front brick steps with granite 
steps 



Town of Chelmsford 
Center Fire Station 



St. Mary's Church 
25 North Rd. 



D. Eric Thompson 
Central Svngs. Bank 
11 North Rd. 

D. Eric Thompson 
Central Svngs. Bank 
11 North Rd. 



August 18, 1980 — erection of 
fieldstone retaining walls on sides 
of right of way. Walls will be top- 
ped with fence similar to existing 
fence behind the fire station. 

August 18, 1980 — replacement of 
5 porches seriously deteriorated, 
construction of a concrete side- 
walk 27'x40", replace wood shut- 
ters with aluminum ones and 
blacktop a parking area 21'x26' 
between porches on Crosby Lane 
side. 

August 18, 1980 — erection of air 
conditioning compressors and 
screen fence. 

September 15, 1980 erection of 
2 signs, 1 free standing sign in the 
front and new lettering on existing 
sign on walkway. 



L. Rodger Currie September 15, 1980 — erection of 

Central Svngs. Bank logo sign on silo. 
Fletcher & North Rd. 



James McClutchy 
16-18 Westford St. 



Peter & Rosemary 

Whiting 

4 Westford St. 



September 15, 1980 — changes in 
right and left side elevations, 
previously approved, to include a 
breezeway to separate the garage 
from the house. 

September 15, 1980 — reconstruct 
and expand the present kitchen 
ell located at the rear of the pro- 
perty. 



Norman Thidemann, October 7, 1980 — exterior chan- 

Exec. Secty., Select- ges for the restoration of the town 

man's Office-Town hall. 
Hall, 1 North Rd. 



Richard B. Codling 
26 Worthen St. 



Bruce Pemberton, 
Chairman, Central 
Baptist Church 
Academy St. 



October 20, 1980 — remove and 
reconstruct existing rear wood 
patio deck using concrete and 
brick. Construct a room under 
deck at existing level. Add new 
12'xl4' room addition to same 
deck. 

October 20- 1980 -build up the 
walkway about 6" to allow direct 
access both to the church and 
fellowship hall by way of a ramp 
in order to meet federal regula- 
tions for handicapped persons. 



Marcelline Chandler October 20, 1980 — erection of a 

New Image Beauty sign 20' by 2'x6" dark red with 

Salon white and gold trim letters. 
7&8 Central Sq. 



86 



James McClutchy 
16-18 Worthen St. 



Paul F. Surprenant 
First Bank & Trust 



November 17, 1980 — erection of 
one or two utility poles on Packard 
Lane. 

November 17, 1980 — erection of 
one double faced 9"x48" il- 
luminated sign with dark bronze 
fluropon skirting with white lexan 
face with cutout applied letters. 



The Commission feels that their decisions in the past 
year have helped maintain the area and that im- 
provements made through the year have enhanced the 
area. Decisions in particular, the completion of the 
restoration of the Fiske House, The Emerson House and 
the Packard House and the construction and landscaping 
done at the Central Savings Bank. The Commission 
would like to thank the townspeople of Chelmsford, 
especially the property owners within the district, for 
their continuing cooperation and support of its efforts to 
preserve and protect the Historic District of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert P. LaPorte, Jr. 
Chairman 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 
DEPARTMENT 

This department has continued with the removal of 
dead and diseased trees, with safety the number one 
priority. The elms continue to create a problem falling 
prey to the Dutch Elm disease. 

We continue to operate on a declining budget with 
operational costs climbing, but with careful placement of 
priorities we have been able to operate with safety our 
number one concern. 

We foresee a much smaller budget next year, but plan 
to continue to serve the town in a safe and efficient man- 



I would like to thank all town departments for their 
assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald P. Gray 

LOWELL REGIONAL 
TRANSIT AUTHORITY 

The Lowell Regional Transit Authority finances 
regular route service between Chelmsford Center and 
Lowell, North Chelmsford and Lowell, a curb to curb 
transportation service called the Chelmsford Road Run- 
ner and the Chelmsford Council on Aging van service. 

Regular route service operates Monday through Satur- 
day. The first bus leaves North Chelmsford at 7:00 a.m. 
and the last bus leaves Lowell for North Chelmsford at 



5:30 p.m. The first bus leaves Chelmsford Center at 7:15 
a.m. and the last bus leaves Lowell for Chelmsford 
Center at 6:30 p.m. The service was provided by Marine! 
Transportation Inc., under contract with the LRTA 
from the first of the year until March. On March 3, 1980, 
the service was assumed by LoLaw Transit Management, 
Inc. under contract with the LRTA. New vehicles were 
placed into service in March and were well received by 
the Town's residents. The new vehicles are air condition- 
ed, equipped with two way radios and special features for 
the elderly and handicapped. The maximum fare is 45<? 
and minimum fare 15<f . Reduced fares for senior citizens, 
other than within Chelmsford are 25 <?. New schedules 
were printed and distributed throughout Chelmsford. 
The LRTA is currently reviewing the present routes and 
studying alternatives to provide service to industrial and 
commercial complexes. Chelmsford residents benefited 
from all LRTA sponsored promotions including the free 
Santa Bus during the Christmas Holidays and the new ac- 
quired trolley buses. Ridership was 86,515 during 1980. 
For information on regular route service, residents should 
call 452-6161. 

Chelmsford Road Runner is a curb to curb transporta- 
tion service available on advance reservation basis to 
Chelmsford residents who are 60 years of age or older or 
handicapped. Chelmsford Road Runner can accomodate 
both ambulatory or wheelchair bound persons. Chelms- 
ford Road Runner service operates Monday through Fri- 
day, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. It can be used for 
medical trips (top priority) shopping, recreation, visiting 
friends and relatives, the Nutrition Program, and other 
special reasons. Road Runner costs 15< per one way trip 
within Chelmsford and 30<? per one way trip to Lowell. 
Chelmsford Road Runner ridership ws 5,414 in 1980. A 
trip can be arranged by calling 256-4140 at least one day 
in advance. 

Chelmsford Council on Aging offers transportation ser- 
vices to Chelmsford residents 60 years of age or older. It 
operates Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 
p.m. Non-ambulatory senior citizens are referred to the 
Chelmsford Road Runner when a wheelchair lift equip- 
ped vehicle is requested. The Council on Aging presently 
does not charge any fare for the use of the service. Coun- 
cil on Aging ridership in 1980 ws 5,813. A trip can be ar- 
ranged by calling 256-0013 at least one day in advance. 

Chelmsford is represented on the LRTA Advisory 
Board by Mr. Norman Thidemann who is also the Vice- 
Chairman of the Advisory Board. Ms. Kathy Robinson is 
alternate representative. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Norman Thidemann 



87 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 



School Committee 

Mr. Louis Kelly, Chairman 

Mr. Randolph Brumagim, Vice-Chairman 

Mr. Stratos Dukakis 

Mrs. Jane Barry, Secretary 

Mr. Douglas Cox 

Mr. William Buxton 

Mr. Robert Manning 

Mrs. Irene Machemer 

Mrs. Charlotte Scott 

Dr. Thomas Thorstensen 



Alternates 



Mr. John Keating 
Mr. Jordan Waugh 
Mr. Augustine Kish 
Mr. Rudolph Schultz 
Mr. Rodney Huff 
Mrs. Cecile Stefanski 



Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Groton 

Littleton 

Pepperell 

Shirley 

Townsend 

Westford 

Westford 



Chelmsford 

Groton 

Littleton 

Pepperell 

Shirley 

Westford 



Superintendent-Director 

Thomas Lafionatis 

Office-100 Littleton Road, Westford, MA 01886 
Telephone: 692-4711 



Asst. Superintendentt-Director 
Academic Coordinator 
Technical Coordinator 
Director of Pupil Services 
Special Needs Administrator 
District Counsel 
District Treasurer 



Mr. Bernholdt Nystrom 

Mr. Raymond Harding 

Mr. David McLaughlin 

Mr. Paul Royte 

Mr. John McCarthy 

Mr. Charles Zaroulis 

Mr. Thomas St. Germain 



The year 1980 was a great growth year for Nashoba 
Tech with the addition of three new towns to our district, 
the towns of Pepperell, Shirley and Townsend, and with 
the successful floating of a three million dollar bond, con- 
struction began in earnest. 

The school program was somewhat disrupted during 
the year because of the construction. The school was clos- 
ed for a total of sixteen school days during this construc- 
tion period. The students and the staff had to be 
evacuated at different times for safety reasons. The 
building schedule was running ahead in the beginning 
because of excellent weather, but as the year wore on 
other factors caused loss of time, so the September 
scheduled opening was delayed about eight days. The 
school opened occupying only part of the expansion. Late 
in November all departments from the rented quarters on 
Powers Road moved into the new addition, including the 
Culinary Arts Department which was housed in the 
school's Ranch House on South Chelmsford Road. 

Setting up the new departments continued until the 
end of 1980 and Christmas vacation. Plans for the new 
year called for finishing touches including much painting 
and other work to be done by the school's departments, 
such as Painting and Decorating, Plumbing and Heating, 
Electrical, Carpentry and Metal Fabrication. 



The new member towns increased the enrollment of 
the school to 750 students this year, and full capacity of 
850 students is expected for next year. Aside from the 
alterations and changes, due to the construction, the 
regular school program continued in a rather normal 
way. A new house was built and completed by the school 
in Westford this year, on Boston Road, and another has 
been started for the school year 1980-81, and this time it 
is being built in the town of Chelmsford, The restoration 
of the Carriage House for the Friends of the Adams 
Library in Chelmsford was completed and dedicated. 
Many other municipal jobs were done for our member 
towns by most of the school departments, including par- 
ticularly, the Printing Department, Automotive Shop, 
Auto Body Shop, Carpentry Department and others. 
Much work was done during the year by a Subcommittee 
to the School Committee, and the Administration, in 
reviewing and restructuring the school's curriculum. 

In a little over twelve years the district has grown from 
four towns to seven towns, and the school has grown from 
eight departments to twenty-two departments. The suc- 
cess stories of Nashoba's graduates is history. 

After thirty-five years in Vocational Education, and 
fifteen years at Nashoba Tech, Superintendent-Director 
Thomas Lafionatis is retiring at the close of the 1980-81 
school year. At the suggestion and request of the Student 
Council, and the Class of 1980, the School Committee 
sanctioned the dedication of the new School Library to 
the Superintendent-Director. The student's groups pro- 
vided the funds for a formal portrait and a bronze plaque 
for the ceremony which will take place early in 1981. 



NORTHERN MIDDLESEX 
AREA COMMISSION 

During 1980, the Northern Middlesex Area Commis- 
sion's regional planning program continued to focus on 
areawide transportation and environmental issues and on 
detailed assistance to improve the older neighborhoods 
and town centers of the region. The Commission received 
over $344,000 to pay its expenses during the past fiscal 
year. Of this, the nine member municipalities were assess- 
ed a total of $60,000, and the balance of funding was 
provided largely by Federal agencies. Over half of the 
funding was dedicated to transportation and transit plan- 
ning work. 

The major issues addressed in 1980 include the follow- 
ing: 1) Housing: An Areawide Housing Opportunity 
Plan was endorsed by all of the member communities 
and approved by the U.S. Department of Housing and 
Urban Development. This Plan serves to direct the type 
and extent of housing assistance needed to meet the hous- 
ing problems of the region. 

2) Water Quality. The Commission completed a 
Water Quality Management Plan and distributed a draft 
to all member municipalities. This Plan has been under- 
way for several years and points the way to steps that can 
be taken by each community to save several million 
dollars in sewer facilities over the next several years. The 



88 



most important cost saving measure would discontinue 
sprawling land development and direct new land uses to 
areas which are or will be served by sewers or which have 
suitable conditions for septic tanks. 

3) Economic Development. The Overall Economic 
Development Plan for the region, which qualifies the 
area for Federal Economic Development Administration 
assistance, was maintained and updated. Also, the Com- 
mission provided extensive information and assistance in 
the establishment of Commercial Area Revitalization 
(CARD) Districts in the region. Under CARD, private 
developers within a State designated area can take advan- 
tage of lower cost financing to stimulate commercial 
revitalization. 

4) Air Quality. The Commission is cooperating with 
the Commonwealth in meeting the Congressionally man- 
dated air quality standards that must be met to qualify 
for significant Federal funds. The Commission role 
focuses on air pollution resulting from the transportation 
system. A number of strategies are being developed tp im- 
prove air quality through transportation alternatives and 
more efficient traffic flow. 

5) Adaptive Reuse. With CETA assistance the Com- 
mission completed an extensive file of buildings suitable 
for adaptive reuse in the region. 

6) Historic Preservation. A "Middlesex Canal Herit- 
age Park Feasibility Study" was completed in cooperation 
with a special Commission established by the State legis- 
lature. The study recommends a number of measures to 
reclaim this historic facility for recreation, pedestrian 
walkways and bikeways. 

7) Multiple Use. Often, when one public investment is 
made, it is possible to gain a number of additional public 
benefits with little or no additional cost. This is par- 
ticularly true with the development of underground sewer 
networks which, in effect create trails and paths through- 
out an area. The Commission evaluated such paths and 
made a number of recommendations to create bikeways, 
walkways, ballfields, and the like utilizing existing and 
planned facilities. 

8) River Crossing: A "Corridor Planning Study" for an 
additional bridge across the Merrimack and for a number 
of improvements to the existing system was completed. 
The Commission continues to work with the State 
Department of Public Works to develop and implement 
facilities to improve the regional traffic flow across the 
Merrimack River. 

9) Center Development. The Commission continues to 
focus a great deal of attention on the older towns centers 
and neighborhoods in the region. These have been 
undertaken on a priority basis with the assent of local of- 
ficials in Pepperell, Dracut, Westford, Chelmsford, 
Tewksbury and Billerica. The effort has resulted in plans 
for traffic improvements, housing rehabilitation, com- 
mercial revitalization, and other improvements vital to 
the particular neighborhood or center and has already 
resulted in a substantial infusion of Federal and State 
funds for implementation of particular improvements, 
particularly housing rehabilitation. 



10) Transit and Commuter Rail. The maintenance of 
an effective and reliable public transportation system is a 
major Commission concern and a close working relation- 
ship between Federal, State and local transit officials has 
resulted in major improvements. New buses have been 
purchased and major terminal facilities are on the draw- 
ing boards. NMAC has provided much of the research 
and planning context for these improvements. Commuter 
rail is viewed as an important advantage for this area. 
However, a number of scheduling changes have been im- 
posed, which have reduced the service schedule. The 
Commission continues to seek a reasonable solution to 
maintain a satisfactory level of service. 

11) Auto Restricted Zone Studies. Downtown Lowell 
was the focus of a specially funded study to determine the 
feasibility of restricting traffic in the downtown. This 
center is undergoing substantial revitalization as a result 
of the National Historic Park, the State Heritage Park, 
and extensive private reinvestment. However, truck and 
automobile traffic is becoming an increasingly difficult 
problem, particularly when the downtown traffic is simp- 
ly passing through to get to another side of the region. 
The NMAC study, based upon surveys of parking facili- 
ties, downtown merchants, other successful revitalization 
plans, and the characteristics of traffic flow, recommend- 
ed a number of measures to improve downtown condi- 
tions. The data and plans supported later City studies to 
stimulate and expand the commercial downtown. 

For Chelmsford, the NMAC program resulted in speci- 
fic assistance to the Town. An extensive study of the 
Vinal Square neighborhood, including traffic, parking, 
housing and commerce. A U.S Department of Housing 
and Urban Development grant for housing has already 
resulted in revitalization. Other measures are pending 
Town approvals. A similar analysis of Central Square was 
recently begun. In addition, NMAC assisted area emp- 
loyers to develop transportation alternatives, undertook 
an extensive evaluation of a proposed industrial park 
near Drum Hill, and continued to press for Route 3 im- 
provements. 

In addition to the major planning efforts highlighted 
above, the Commission also carried out its responsibility 
as a regional clearinghouse to review various applications 
for Federal assistance generated in the region, and to 
review a number of State programs submitted for review 
and comment. In 1980, these projects brought over 125 
millions of dollars into the region. There were also a 
number of instances of local technical assistance in muni- 
cipal management, open space planning, restoration of 
water quality, grantsmanship and traffic safety. 

The program for 1981 will continue to focus on older 
neighborhoods and town centers but will emphasize com- 
mercial area revitalization. A more extensive energy pro- 
gram is envisioned and a Ridesharing Information Office 
is already underway. Contingency planning for energy 
shortages is also a priority. There will be a strip develop- 
ment case study in Route 38 south of the river through 
Tewksbury, and a special study of subdivision roads in 
Westford and Tyngsborough. There will be an historical 
analysis and revitalization plan for Mill Village in 
Billerica. A program for Central Square in Chelmsford 
has just begun. 



89 



The Commission has also filed for special legislation to 
enable its member communities to contract with it where 
NMAC may be particularly suited to perform some func- 
tion. The Commission's overall goal is to provide a 
regional framework within which local government can 
work effectively. The proposed legislation is directed to 
that same end. 

A more extensive review of the 1980 activities was 
published in the Lowell Sun on Sunday, November 9, 
1980. A copy is available in the Town public library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Carson 

Eugene E. Gilet 

Bernard Lynch 

Town of Chelmsford 



OFFICE OF 
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

The Office of Community Development was establish- 
ed in June of 1980 to administer the federally funded 
Small Cities Community Development Block Grant that 
the Town received in 1980. This grant of $284,000 
finances the Vinal Square Housing Rehabilitation Pro- 
gram and the Vinal Square Commercial Facade Im- 
provement Program. In addition, the Office is adminis- 
tering a State/Federal financed "701" Planning Grant in 
Vinal and Central Square. 

The Vinal Square Housing Rehabilitation Program 
seeks to encourage low and moderate income home- 
owners in the designated target area to correct code defi- 
ciencies, increase energy efficiency, and to generally im- 
prove the appearance of their property. The goal is to 
rehabilitate 85-100 structures. Through December 1980, 
the Office has processed over 75 applications with 45 
determined eligible for financial assistance, including a 
partial grant and an interest subsidy on a bank loan. 

The Vinal Square Commercial Facade Program, fund- 
ed through the same grant, seeks to encourage the owners 
of neighborhood commercial properties in the designated 
target area to improve their commercial facades in an ef- 
fort to improve the aesthetics of the Square in particular, 
and the Town in general. Further, it is hoped that this 
program will improve the business climate of the Com- 
munity and the neighborhood. The Office subsidizes 
bank loans down to 8% for the owners eligible of com- 
mercial property within the target area. This money is to 
be used solely for facade improvements and increased ac- 
cessibility for the handicapped. 

With the aid of the "701" Planning Grants the impact 
of the Town's growth in both Vinal and Central Square 
will be assessed. Comprehensive plans will be formulated 
to alleviate conditions of distress, promote balanced 
economic development and increase public service com- 
mitment within the areas. 

It is also the responsibility of this office to investigate 
other Community Development Programs for the Town, 



and to advise the Board of Selectmen and the Town on 
Community Development matters. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bernard F. Lynch 
Community Development Coordinator 




PERSONNEL BOARD 

Seated: Alan Murphy (chairman); Patricia Garrigan. 
Standing, Bernice O'Neil (clerk); J. Rene Scutt 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

The Personnel Board is composed of three members, 
two of whom are appointed by the Town Moderator. The 
third member of the Board is elected by non-union town 
employees. Current members are Mr. Alan Murphy, 
Chairman, Ms. Patricia Garrigan and Mr. J. Rene Scutt. 
The clerk to the Board is Ms. Bernice O'Neil. Mr. Mur- 
phy has served as Chairman since July, 1980, succeeding 
Ms. Barbara Ward who left the Board at the end of the 
year after serving several years as a member and then 
Chairman. 

The purpose of the Board is to formulate and imple- 
ment policy regarding personnel administrative prac- 
tices, wages, benefits, performance evaluations, job 
descriptions and organization changes. In addition, the 
Board maintains personnel records and approves starting 
salaries and salary increases. 

Two of the most important responsibilities of each 
town supervisor is to perform an annual evaluation of 
employee performance and to review the objectives of 
each job position. As an aid to improving supervisors' 
skills in these two areas, a very successful half-day work 
session was held in October 1980 that was attended by 
almost every department head supervisor in town govern- 
ment. Ms. Garrigan served as moderator for the session. 
Mr. Murphy began the meeting with a presentation on 
how to write job descriptions. Ms. Ward then presented a 



90 



revised performance evaluation plan. Mr. Murphy closed 
out the meeting with a presentation of a new salary plan 
that will be implemented, pending town meeting ap- 
proval, on July 1, 1981. Mr. J. Rene Scutt and Ms. Bever- 
ly Purtell served as consultants to the Board for the plan- 
ning and conduct of the meeting. 

Other activities undertaken by the Board during the 
past year included a salary survey of all Library positions 
below that of Director, upgrading the position of Town 
Aide, the approval of a newly created position of Super- 
visor of Central Operations in the Highway Department, 
and the approval of an expansion of the Recreation Com- 
mission to include the Youth Center. The Board also ap- 
proved starting salaries for new hires to the positions of 
Wire Inspector, Building Inspector, Highway Depart- 
ment Head, Executive Secretary and Assistant Library 
Director. Lastly, the Board sponsored and the 1980 town 
meeting approved vacation benefits for regular part-time 
employees. 

During 1981 the Board will work closely with all town 
departments to implement the provision of Proposition 
2 J /4 in a way that is fair and equitable to town employees. 
The Board will also review existing personnel policy and 
procedures so that the town can continue to attract and 
maintain highly skilled and motivated employees. 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

The Chelmsford Recreation Commission consists of a 
maximum of nine appointed volunteers. The Selectmen, 
on an annual basis, may re-appoint present members or 
appoint new ones. Anyone wishing to be considered for 
appointment is advised to apply in writing to the Select- 
men. At present the Commission is at its maximum of 
nine members. 

Responsibility for meeting Chelmsford's recreational 
needs and composition and administration of the Recrea- 
tion Budget rests with the Recreation Commission. Sub- 
sequently, the Recreation Director is responsible for 
ascertaining and meeting recreational need, initiation of 
innovative programming, development of a long range 
recreational plan and the administration of all programs 
provided by the Recreation Commission. Although the 
main thrust of Chelmsford Recreation has been to pro- 
vide youth programs, now being developed by the 
Recreation Director are new programs to serve all the 
recreational needs of Chelmsford. 

As a result of a survey, conducted by the Recreation 
Director, it has been determined that Town sports pro- 
grams are more than adequately meeting needs and that 
there now exists a void in the areas of adult recreation, 
cultural recreation and general recreation activities. 
Responding to these needs the Recreation Director 
developed and offered the After School Gym Program to 
boys and girls, Adult Volleyball Program and Christmas 
Card Making class. Many more programs are slated to 
commence as soon as the new Recreation Community 
Center (part of the McFarlin Town Hall Complex) is 
ready for occupancy. A financial aid to these programs in 
the Revolving Account which was developed by the Re- 
creation Director and approved at Town Meeting. 



The newly revamped Summer Playground Program 
had a very successful season. For six weeks in July and 
August a daily recreation program transpired at Roberts, 
Varney, Westlands and South Row Playgrounds. In addi- 
tion to the Playground Program specialized training was 
available in the following areas: Arts & Crafts, Dance, 
Drama, Gymnastics, Physical Education, Tennis and 
Track and Field. Also included in the Summer Program 
were: The Annual two mile road race, attracting 290 en- 
trants, a presentation of the Gerwick Puppets, a visit by 
the Zoomobile, a trip to the Stone Zoo, Recreation Field 
Day and Recreation Exhibition Day. The average daily 
participation figure for the Summer Playground Pro- 
gram was 205. 

Crystal Lake attracted an average daily figure of 280 
participants during the ten week Summer Swim Pro- 
gram. 

Brochures, for the first time, have been made available 
to the public detailing Chelmsford Recreation Programs. 

Chelmsford's Recreation Community Center has ceas- 
ed operations temporarily as the East School has been 
leased to the Boy Scouts by the Selectmen. The new home 
will be in the Town Hall Complex. 

Widening its scope of responsibility the Recreation 
Commission now administers, through the Recreation 
Director, the Chelmsford Youth Center. Activities at the 
Youth Center include Arts & Crafts, Dances, Games, 
Sports, Trips and the Place-A-Teen (PAT) Program. 
Operations have temporarily been halted and will resume 
in the Community Center when it is completed. Addi- 
tionally, a support group, Friends of the Youth Center, 
has been established. 

Culturally, the Recreation Commission sponsors the 
Community Band which performs six concerts, four dur- 
ing the Summer on the Common, and one each at Christ- 
mas and in the Spring. Patchwork Theatre, under spon- 
sorship of the Recreation Commission, both instructs in 
theatrical skills and stages dramatic performances. Drum 
and Bugle enthusiasts can turn to the Golden Buc- 
caneers, another Recreation Commission sponsored 
organization. 

Athletics consume a large slice of the Recreation Com- 
mission budget, most of which goes toward purchasing 
uniforms and equipment for the volunteer organizations. 
Leadership for these organizations is provided by volun- 
teers. 

Capital expense has lately been devoted to Soccer. The 
goal this year is to obtain an underground irrigation 
system for the two newly constructed Soccer Fields. 

The following is a list of Chelmsford Recreation Com- 
mission sponsored volunteer athletic organizations with 
respective sport: Baseball — T-Ball, Chelmsford Youth 
Athletic Club, Little League, Babe Ruth, Northeast, 
Eastern Mass., Lou Gehrig; Basketball — Chelmsford 
Youth Basketball League; Football — Pop Warner; 
Skating — Chelmsford Hockey Association; Soccer — Chel- 
msford Youth Soccer Association; Softball — Chelmsford 
Softball Association; Wrestling and Swimming. Approx- 



91 



imately 5,000 youths are registered in these programs. 

Currently, the aim of the Recreation Commission is to 
expand programs to serve the total recreational needs of 
Chelmsford, as well as to continue to sponsor volunteer 
organizations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard A. Page 
Recreation Director 

Bruce MacDonald, Chairman 

Bette Ressel, Vice Chairman 

Rodger Abernathy 

Jack Bilodeau 

Harry Ayotte 

Robert Charpentier 

Joan Murray 

Paul Murphy 

Karen Spinney 

Chelmsford Recreation Commission Members 



SIGN ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



The committee reviewed 69 sign applications. 

The 80 foot free standing Sunoco sign was removed 
from Drum Hill. 

A new sign application form was accepted. Sign by-law 
changes were proposed and adopted by Town Meeting. 

Billboards (off premises) were to come down in June 
1980. We met with a representative of Ackerley Corp. 
concerning their billboards. As of Sept. 25, 1980 they 
were protected by a "grandfather clause" sponsored by 
Gov. King's administration. 

Susanne Reade did not accept reappointment. Charles 
Mardorosian's resignation in December '80 was accepted 
with appreciation for his many contributions over the last 
two years. 



Jean Rook 
Deborah Dion 
Mitchell Korbey 



term expires 1982 
term expires 1982 
term expires 1981 



TOWN AIDE 

The aim of this department during 1980 has been to 
seek and encourage low income residents to take advan- 
tage of all available programs which may benefit them. 
Many programs are sponsored by Community Team- 
work, Inc. but much assistance has been available 
through Merrimack Valley Legal Services, Elder Services 
of the Merrimack Valley, local hospitals and mental 
health associations. The following statistical breakdown 
summarizes many of the recruitment and referral ac- 
tivities provided by this department and includes the 
financial impact during 1980. 



Vocational Advancement through Skill 

Training (1 1 enrollees) $ 19,182 

Neighborhood Youth Corps (78 enrollees) 53,811 

Family Life Services (26 enrollees) 26,848 

Senior Companion Program (22 enrollees) 5,394 

Foster Grandparents ( 1 2 enrollees) 6,969 

R S V P (37 enrollees) 13,008 

Housing Assistance ( 1 6 enrollees) 33 , 047 

Head Start ( 1 enrollees) 1 9 , 000 

Fuel Assistance (267 enrollees) 145,917 

Winterization (10 enrollees) 4,014 

Total (489 persons) $327,1 90 

This office also directly provides advocacy as well as 
referral, offering the extra support that some of our 
residents may need to cope with difficult times. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen M. Robinson 
Town Aide 



TOWN FESTIVAL COMMITTEE 

Members 

Joan Beddoe-Chairperson Patricia O'Brien-Treasurer 
Regina Wojcik-Asst. Chairperson Ralph Card 

Elina Blais-Secretary Lorraine Lambert 

The Town Festival Committee was organized in the 
summer of 1979 and was accepted by the Chelmsford 
Board of Selectmen. 

The purpose of the committee was to provide a day 
when all the organizations that function within Chelms- 
ford and service the citizens of Chelmsford can have an 
opportunity to show the community what they do, what 
services they offer, and be able to recruit members. 

The Festival was held on Saturday, May 17, at McCar- 
thy Field. Forty-two organizations participated. Each 
group had an informational booth and in addition there 
were food booths and demonstrations and performances 
during the day. The Festival was well-attended and the 
Committee felt that the response was good, especially for 
the first year. 

In 1981 the Festival will take place on Saturday, May 
16th at McCarthy field. 

A contest was held for a design for a logo, that was used 
for the posters and for T-shirts. The winner was Susan 
Sielian, a ninth grader at McCarthy JHS. This year 
another competition will be held for a new logo design. 

FESTIVAL 80 was sponsored in part by the Chelms- 
ford School Department and from gifts from local spon- 
sors. A percentage of the sales was collected in lieu of a 
fixed booth charge. Informational groups are invited to 
participate at no fee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joan Beddoe, Chairperson 



92 




DEPARTMENT OF 
VETERANS' SERVICES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen, and residents of 
the Town of Chelmsford, I respectfully submit the An- 
nual Report of the activities of this department, as 
Veterans' Agent and Investigator for the year 1980. Pur- 
pose: to service the needs of veterans and the dependents 
of veterans under Mass. General Law Chapter 115. Also, 
to work very closely with the commanders and service of- 
ficers of all veterans organizations. Two valued services 
are provided, one pertains to assistance with application 
for possible entitlements of federal benefits under the 
Veterans' Administration. The other to financially aid 
and give assistance to qualified veterans and dependents 
of veterans under "veterans' benefits." 

The Department of Veteran Services is established for 
the purpose of furnishing such information, advice and 
assistance to veterans and dependents of veterans, as may 
be necessary to procure the benefits to which they may be 
entitled relative to other educational opportunities, 
hospitalization, medical care, pension and other benefits. 
Close to 80% of our residents have actual or potential 
veteran entitlement. The field of veterans' affairs, in- 
cluding the work of the Department of Veterans' Services, 
is now a major activity of our local state and federal 
government. 

Veterans' Administration/ Federal expenditures Town 
of Chelmsford 

Autos and special equipment for disabled 

veterans $2,000 

Compensation to dependents for veterans' service- 

10,000 

204,000 

34,000 

4,000 

205,000 

1,426,000 

276,000 

235,000 

254,000 



connected death 
Dependents Indemnity Compensation (DIC) 
Sons, daughters, wives, and widows education 
Specially adapted housing for disabled veterans 
Veterans death pension 
Veterans disability compensation 
Veterans disability pension 
Veterans insurance and indemnities 
Veterans readjustment training 
Veterans burial awards and other miscellaneous 

benefit payments 
Vocational rehabilitation training for 

disabled veterans 

TOTAL $2,699,000 



39,000 



10,000 



At present I am serving as a Legislative Agent with 
Massachusetts Veteran Services Association and 
Sergeant-at-arms for Middlesex County Agents during 
1980-1981. 

The Department of Veteran Services wishes to thank 
the Board of Selectmen, town officials, employees, 
Veterans' Organizations and civic organizations for their 
kind assistance and cooperation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary K. McAuliffe 
Veterans' Agent 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 

The Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee did not 
receive any requests for assistance from Veterans of 
World War II, nor the Veterans' Agent, during the year 
1980. 

Applications for assistance are always reviewed at first 
with the Veterans' Agent of the Town to determine if that 
town department can assist as a portion of the funds 
available come through state participation. The 
Veterans' Emergency Fund has always served as a backup 
agency to further assist our veterans. Aid, when approved 
by a majority vote of the committee members, is in the 
form of Material Grants, such as medical, fuel, housing, 
utility and clothing allowances. 

As reported in our financial statement, our funds are 
invested in local savings institutions. Various funds are on 
deposit in a savings account which presently yields 5-V6 % 
annually. Other funds are on deposit in a Variable Rate 
Certificate bearing interest at the rate of 12% annually. 
The certificate is written for a thirty-month period. The 
savings bank account has a substantial balance in order 
to meet current needs. 

The total assets have increased during the year 1 980 by 
$558. 10 and with the writing of the Variable Rate Certifi- 
cate yielding 12% annually until October 31, 1982, we 
are now in a position for further growth of the assets of 
the fund. Since its inception during mid 1947 the assets 
have increased more than $5,000.00 and at the same 
time, the fund has aided a number of veterans of World 
War II. 

Our Precinct 7 Representative, Thomas A. Ennis, 
changed his residence and a new replacement was nam- 
ed. Mr. Carl J. Lebedzinski, a Veteran of World War II, 
was appointed by the Selectmen to serve as the Represen- 
tative from Precinct 7. During January of 1980 the Select- 
men also appointed Mr. Robert E. Donaldson as Repre- 
sentative from Precinct 1. Mr. Donaldson is also a 
Veteran of World War II. 



93 



Once again we list the names of members of our com- 
mittee in the event that future applicants might care to 
submit requests for information or applications for 
assistance. 



LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities: $ None 

Total Assets, Less Liabilities: $8,081.76 



The members are: 
Precinct 1: 

Robert E. Donaldson 
Precinct 2: 

Victor W. Fetro 
Precinct 3: 

James J. Walker 
Precinct 4: 

John J. McNulty 
Precinct 5: 

George F. Waite 
Precinct 6: 

Alfred H. Coburn 



Precinct 7: 

Carl J. Lebedzinski 
Precinct 8: 

Dr. Kenneth A. Cooke 
Precinct 9: 

Peter J. Saulis 
Precinct 10: 

Melvin P. dejager 
Precinct 11: 

Herbert T. Knutson 
Precinct 12: 

Gerard A. Vayo 



The Committee extends their appreciation to the 
Selectmen for their assistance during the year. And we 
also wish to thank the personnel in the Selectmen's Office 
for their cooperation and help, and to the Town 
Veterans' Agent, Mrs. Mary K. McAuliffe, and her staff, 
for the valuable assistance given to the committee in the 
past. 

Respectfully yours, 

Veteran's Emergency Fund Committee 
of the Town of Chelmsford 

Alfred H. Coburn, Chairman 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

January 1, 1980 to December 31, 1980 

Balance on Hand as of January 1, 1980 $7,523.66 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, 
Mass. Interest $287.65 

The Commonwealth Federal Savings 

and Loan Association, Lowell, Mass. 

Dividends 270.45 

Total Receipts: 558.10 

Total Balance on Hand as of January 1, 1980 and 

Receipts: 8,081.76 

Deduct Disbursements None 

Balance on Hand as of December 31, 1980: . . .$8,081.76 



Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford 
Veterans' Emergency Fund 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



ASSETS 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

On Deposit, Bank Book Number 128790: . . . $5,467.09 

Commonwealth Federal Savings and Loan Association, 

Lowell, Mass. 

Variable Rate Certificate, Account Number 
05-605-022: . .2,614.67 

Total Assets: $8,081.76 



INDEX 

Applications for Appointments to Town Committees 94 

Appointed Town Officials 70 

Board of Assessors 52 

Board of Registrars 56 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Celebrations Committee 81 

Cemetery Commission 53 

Civil Defense Commission 82 

Conservation Commission s 82 

Council on Aging 83 

Department of Veteran's Services ■ 92 

Dog Officer 84 

Elected Town Officials 3 

Energy Advisory Committee 81 

Fire Department 76 

General Information 2 

Health Department 53 

Highway Department 77 

Historical Commission 84 

Historic District Commission 85 

Housing Authority 54 

Industrial Commission 82 

Insect Pest Control 86 

Inspector of Animals 80 

Inspector of Buildings 76 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 87 

Northern Middlesex Area Commission 87 

Office of Community Development 89 

Park Department 54 

Personnel Board 89 

Planning Board 55 

Police Department 78 

Police — Auxiliary 80 

Public Libraries 55 

Recreation Commission 90' 

School Committee 57 

Sign Advisory Committee 91 

Town Accountant 71 

Town Aide 91 

Town Clerk 6 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting January 19, 1980 7 

Special Town Meeting January 19, 1980 7 

Town Warrant for Presidential Primary March 4, 1980 7 

Democratic Presidential Primary. . . ., 10 

Republican Presidential Primary 9 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting April 5, 1980 and April 28, 1980 11 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting May 5, 1980 19 

Results of Annual Town Election April 5, 1980 22 

Annual Town Meeting April 28, 1980 24 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 1, 1980 32 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 5, 1980 36 

Special Town Meeting May 5, 1980 38 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 12, 1980 42 

Town Warrant for State Primary Election September 16, 1980 45 

Results of State Primary Election September 16, 1980 46 

Town Warrant for State Election November 4, 1980 47 

Results of State Election November 4, 1 980 50 

Town Directory Back 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 70 

Tree Department 59 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 92 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN HALL 

1 NORTH ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MASS. 01824 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, please fill out this form 
and mail to: Administrative Assistant, Board of Selectmen, Town Hall, Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts 01824. The filling out of this form in no way assures appointment. All com- 
mittee vacancies will be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular 
capacity. 

NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE. 

ADDRESS AMT. OF TIME AVAILABLE 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS . 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting: 256-3621 
Assessors: 256-2031 
Board of Appeals Clerk: 256-6400 
Building Inspector: 256-8346 

(Yard Sales, Kennel Permits & Bldg. Permits) 
Cemetery Garage: 256-8671 
Chamber of Commerce — Chelmsford: 256-3063 

20 Chelmsford St. (Wed. only) 
Community Teamwork: 459-0551 
Conservation Commission (Town Hall): 256-7164 
Council on Aging: 256-0013 

Dog Officer: 256-5340 (Police Station: 256-0754) 
Fire Department: 256-2543 
Gas Inspector: 256-8347 
Health Department: 256-2061 
Highway Department: 256-2161 

Garage: 251-4841 
High School, Richardson Rd.: 251-8792 
Housing Authority: 256-7425 
Housing for the Elderly, 1 Smith St.: 256-7425 
Libraries: Adams-256-5521; McKay- 251 -3212 
Mass. Electric: 458-1431 
Park Department Garage: 256-5073 
Planning Board Clerk: 256-7164 
Plumbing Inspector: 453-2746 
Police Department: 256-2521 
Post Office: 256-2361 
Recreation Comm: 256-1588 
Registry of Deeds: 458-8474 
Registry of Motor Vehicles: 459-9397 
School Dept., 31 Princeton St.: 251-4961 
Selectmen: 256-2441 
Town Aide: 256-0013 or 256-6632 
Town Clerk: 256-4101 



Treasurer/Tax Collector: 256-2122 

Veterans' Agent: 256-8713 (Draft Cards) 

Water Department: 256-2381 

Welcome Wagon: 251-2551 

Welfare: 256-2731 

Wiring Inspector: 256-8347 

24-hr. Juror Hot Line (Toll Free) 800-792-5117 

POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS: 

Precinct 1: Center School, Billerica Rd. 

Precinct 2: No. Elementary School, Groton Rd. 

Precinct 3: Moses Parker Jr. High, Graniteville Rd. 

Precinct 4: East School, Carlisle St. 

Precinct 5: Byam School, Maple Rd. 

Precinct 6: Westlands School, Dalton Rd. 

Precinct 7: North Elementary School, Groton Rd. 

Precinct 8: Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Jr. High, North Rd. 
Precinct 9: So. Row School, Boston Rd. 
Precinct 10: So. Row School, Boston Rd. 
Precinct 11: Westlands School, Dalton Rd. 
Precinct 12: Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Jr. High, North Rd. 
Senator Edward Kennedy & Paul Tsongas 
JFK Federal Building, Government Center, 02203 
Rep. Bruce Freeman: State House, Boston 02133 
Office: 1-727-2560 

Home: 7 Kenwood St., Chelmsford, MA 01824 256-2944 
Senator Carol Amick: State House, Boston 
Office: 1-727-2571 

Home: 18 Crescent Ave., Bedford, MA 
Congressman James M. Shannon: 459-2600 
142 East Haverhill St., Lawrence, MA 
Middlesex County Commissioners: 1-494-4100 
Superior Courthouse, E. Cambridge, MA 02141